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When You Can’t Fight… Run!

In this article I’m going to talk about the flight subjects in the Survival Fitness Plan, which are parkour, mountain bike riding, swimming, and rock climbing. 

Basically a bunch of outdoor sports that I feel are the most useful to use when running away from your enemy.

SFP Flight Subjects Vlog

Discovering an Interest

When I was a kid, I really wasn’t interested in sports much apart from martial arts. I did enjoy the outdoors, such as camping and running around in the bush, but organized team sport was not my thing, and to be honest, it still isn’t. 

Fast forward to when I was a teenager. I had finished high school at this point but had no real direction in life. It’s fair to say that I got into a bit of trouble. Well, maybe more than a bit. It was enough that my Mum decided i needed to leave the country for a while.

At that time my Dad was working for Outward Bound in Sabah and I started to get involved. It was a lot of outdoors activities such as hiking, sailing, climbing, and general team building stuff, and that’s how I was introduced to the world of outdoor recreation. 

Sadly, my father passed away less than a year after I arrived. I stuck around for a little bit but eventually I was “shipped” back home to Australia. 

Once again with no money, but at least this time I had a direction.

Becoming an ‘Outdoor Leader’

Once back in Australia I enrolled in TAFE (the equivalent of Community College or BTEC in the UK) to study Outdoor Leadership. 

I chose hiking and rock-climbing as my two specialties, and after a while I started working in the industry. 

So that was my profession for five or so years – being an outdoors leader. It was also a big part of my social life. All us “Outdoor Leaders’ would hang out and go climbing, camping, kayaking, and do a bunch of other outdoors stuff whenever we had the chance. 

Learning Parkour

I think it took me a while to catch onto what parkour was. I had always kind of done it as a kid trying to imitate Jackie Chan but I had no idea it was an official thing. When i discovered it was an actual sport that people do, I was thrilled.

There wasn’t any parkour gyms in my city back then so I would just practice in the park by myself. I used to go at first light so no-one else was there. I hate being the center of attention and practicing parkour by yourself in a park isn’t quite the same as going for a jog.

Eventually I went to Singapore to train with A2 Parkour. This was around the same time that I was going to the different martial arts camps, which I talked about yesterday. It was my ‘travel and train’ phase.

With A2 Parkour I solidified the fundamentals and from that came ‘Essential Parkour Training’.

Out of all the flight subjects in the Survival Fitness Plan, parkour is the most important because it is the one you are most likely to need when running away from an attacker. 

My Fight and Flight Training Schedule

Out of all the subjects of the Survival Fitness Plan in the fight and flight realm, I would definitely start with either self-defense or parkour, or you could do them both at the same time and then move on to the others.

My general training schedule is one day training in self-defense and then the next in parkour, but if there’s nowhere to do parkour, I just do road work. This is more often the case because it’s a bit hard to find places to do parkour sometimes, but there is always somewhere you can just run.

Also, when you are on the street doing parkour alone people look at you strange. If you’ve got a group of you doing it, that’s fine. But as a traveler, it’s kind of hard to get that group going, and I prefer to train alone in any case. 

So, one day is fight training, the next day is parkour, then fight training and then parkour. The fifth day is for one of the other flight subject. I might go swimming at the beach or in a pool, ride a bike, go bouldering, or maybe go for a hike. It just depends on the situation and my location at the time. 

Practical Training

I just want to emphasize a bit about how the Survival Fitness Plan only focuses on the fundamentals. It seems like a lot to learn, but you are really only learning a handful of things from each subject. Just enough for it to be useful, not becoming an expert.

Let’s take rock-climbing as an example. There are many different ways to do rock-climbing (top rope, sport, speed, etc). But in the Survival Fitness Plan, we specifically focus on bouldering because you don’t need any equipment for that. 

And when you’re in a survival situation, the chances of you having all the gear is not very likely. Unless you’re specifically there to climb.

So let’s say you’re out hiking and then something happens and you find yourself in a survival situation, and to get out of there you need to climb over some rocks. That’s the type of practical climbing we’re talking about. 

Another example is Essential Parkour. If you take a look at the training manual you’ll notice that there’s nothing to do with flipping or anything that’s not practical.

Bottom line is that the Survival Fitness Plan is very practical. 

Conclusion

Well, that’s it for now!

If you want to learn more you can take a look at the training manuals or even just grab yourself a free preview.

In the next article from this introduction series we will take a look the the survival subjects in the Survival Fitness Plan. Read it here: https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/do-you-have-what-it-takes-to-survive

Safe Training 🙂

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