Survival Fitness Plan https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com Train to Survive Any Situation Wed, 18 Apr 2018 08:04:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Self-Defense Combinations Hand Formula http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/self-defense-combinations-hand-formula/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/self-defense-combinations-hand-formula/#respond Mon, 16 Apr 2018 01:44:37 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=13780 Learn the Vortex-Control Self-Defense combinations hand formula. Once you have completed your entry and are in the check-mate position you can go into the hand formula. Some of these entry techniques are in the Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense combinations. GET YOUR FREE SELF-DEFENSE TRAINING SCHEDULES The information in this post is from “The Vortex Control
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Learn the Vortex-Control Self-Defense combinations hand formula. Once you have completed your entry and are in the check-mate position you can go into the hand formula. Some of these entry techniques are in the Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense combinations.


The information in this post is from “The Vortex Control Self-Defense Bundle” by Sam Fury.

Self-Defense Combinations Hand Formula

From the check-mate position, take control of your opponent’s lead arm with your rear hand. Twist his body as you hook with your lead.

1 Self-Defense Combinations Hand Formula, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

If your opponent puts his/her hand up to block the hook, curl your wrist down to guide it out of the way. Finish the curling circle and continue the hooking motion. It is one fluid movement.

2 Self-Defense Combinations Hand Formula, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

Take control of your opponent’s lead with your lead and twist his/her body back the other way. Attack your opponent’s ribs.

Use both your hands to jerk down on your opponent’s lead arm. Drop your weight into it to give a whiplash effect.

3 Self-Defense Combinations Hand Formula, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

Immediately after pulling him down bring your lead hand back up to strike him underneath the jaw.

Pull your opponent’s rear shoulder as you push on his/her lead upper arm to twist his/her back towards you.

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Bring your opponent to his knees by applying pressure on the suprascapular nerve. At the same time, use the heel of your foot to push down and forward on the top of his/her calf, a little below the knee.

How you do this exactly will depend on your angle in relation to your opponent.

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The picture on the left (below) shows the location of the suprascapular nerve. You do not have to be very accurate when applying pressure point techniques. Dig in, rub, and press your fingers around the area. You’ll know when you hit something from your opponent’s reaction.

Chop down on your opponent’s suprascapular nerves. Next, Cup your hands and clap them on your opponent’s ears, i.e., with his head in-between your hands.

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An alternative ending is to do a hammer-fist strike over your opponent’s shoulder. The ideal target would be the solar plexus. This is instead of bringing him to his knees.

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Apply a choke hold. Encircling your arms around your opponent’s neck and then squeeze them together.

Wrap your left arm around the front of your opponent’s neck and grab your right elbow. With your right hand along the back of your opponent’s neck, you grab your left elbow.

8 Self-Defense Combinations Hand Formula, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

You can also apply this choke once your opponent is on his/her knees.

It is important to know that you do not have to get to check-mate before starting the formula. In a real fight, you will probably not need to go through the whole formula. Often the entry will be enough to finish a fight.

Furthermore, you need not do the formula in order. You can mix and match all the elements of Vortex Control Self-Defense as needed. Exactly what you do depends on the circumstance and your opponent’s reaction(s).

Here are a few of the uncountable variations that you may choose to use:

After attacking the ribs go into attacking your opponent’s back.

9 Self-Defense Combinations Hand Formula, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

After the hammer entry go into arm pulling.

10 Self-Defense Combinations Hand Formula, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

From attacking the ribs go back into check-mate. You can repeat this many times.

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After the hook go into an underarm pressure lock.

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Photo Credit: By Judokickbox (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons. Cropped.

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White Water Swimming Skills http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/white-water-swimming-skills/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/white-water-swimming-skills/#respond Sat, 14 Apr 2018 08:45:21 +0000 https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=16179 Learn white water swimming skills and how to overcome swift water obstacles. They are useful for white water rafting safety, open water swimming, and other white water adventures. If possible, it is best to practice these techniques in a controlled environment. Use a white water park or white water swimming pool. Having a white water
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Learn white water swimming skills and how to overcome swift water obstacles. They are useful for white water rafting safety, open water swimming, and other white water adventures. If possible, it is best to practice these techniques in a controlled environment. Use a white water park or white water swimming pool. Having a white water lifeguard present is necessary for all scenarios.


The information in this post is from “Swim Workouts and Water Rescue Skills” by Sam Fury.


Contents

White Water Swimming Skills

Before you can overcome obstacles in white water rapids, you need to adjust your swimming style depending on the situation and what lays ahead.

The Defensive Position

In most cases, the best thing to do when experiencing trouble in the water is to tread water and signal for help. When in swift water treading may not be practical as the current will drag you away.

When you first fall in swift water, e.g., out of your white water kayak, adopt the defensive position. Get on your back with your feet up so you can see your toes. Float downstream feet first.

This position will enable you to see the path ahead. Guide yourself through the safest route of passage. If you meet any obstructions you can absorb the impact with your legs.

Keeping your feet up ensures they don’t get caught in obstructions beneath the surface. Never try to stand up in river rapids that are deep enough for you to float in.

When you see an obstruction you want to avoid, angle your body so that your feet point towards the obstacle. Aim the top of your head towards your destination and use a modified skulling motion to get there.

1 White Water Swimming Skills, Survival Fitness Plan Swift Water Rescue Training

The Aggressive Position

If you see an opportunity to get to safety, and it is deep enough to do so, you can use an aggressive position to get there. The aggressive position is doing freestyle while keeping your head out of the water.

2 White Water Swimming Skills, Survival Fitness Plan Swift Water Rescue Training

The aggressive position is very tiring so reserve it for when you need short bursts of power. You could also use breast or side stroke. They will be slower but with better visibility.

How to Negotiate Obstructions in Swift Water

An obstruction is anything in the water which changes the normal flow (current) of the water. Almost anything in the water will do this, such as rocks, branches, etc.

Drops

A drop is when water drops straight down. A waterfall is an obvious example.

Never go in the water upstream from a drop. Even if the water is shallow and appears calm before the drop, it is still very dangerous.

When going over a drop is unavoidable, ball up and try to land feet first. Landing feet first is best to protect your head. Balling up will lessen the possibility of getting caught in a foot entrapment.

If it is a high drop, as you go over the edge adopt the high-level entry position.

Eddies

Eddies occur when water rushes around obstacles and the current comes back on itself. They are often a safe-haven since the water in the eddy is generally calmer.

The barrier of separation between the upstream and downstream water is the eddy line. Problems can occur when crossing this line, especially if the flow is fast. Unless you are in a craft that can capsize (like a kayak) you shouldn’t face much danger.

1 White Water Swimming Skills, Survival Fitness Plan Water Rescue Training

You can break through the eddy line with barrel rolls.

As you approach the eddy, place your closest hand into the upstream moving water inside it.

2 White Water Swimming Skills, Survival Fitness Plan Water Rescue Training

Scoop the water with this hand as you roll over onto your stomach. You are now in the aggressive swimming position.

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Continue to roll until you are back in the defensive swimming position.

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You may need to barrel roll a few times to get into the eddy. You can finish in either the defensive or aggressive swimming position.

This image is a demonstration of using defensive and aggressive swimming to get out of a river.

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Sometimes an eddy can create a whirlpool effect. This is when eddies become dangerous since the whirlpool can suck you down. In this case, you should stay clear of them.

6 White Water Swimming Skills, Survival Fitness Plan Water Rescue Training

Entrapments

An entrapment is anything that you can get snagged on, e.g., your clothing snagging on a branch underwater.
To prevent this make sure all your gear and clothing is a snug fit.

A foot entrapment is when you get your foot stuck. It is very dangerous as the force of the water can hold you under.

Holes

Holes occur when water flows over a ledge (such as a rock). This creates a hydraulic flow (water circulating on top of itself) which can trap things. It is like a vertical eddy and is very dangerous.

Dams and dam-like structures (weirs, spillways, ledges) have severe hydraulic action. Keep away from their downstream base.

If caught in a hole you need to relax and swim out the bottom (where the slower current flows out) or to the side.

7 White Water Swimming Skills, Survival Fitness Plan Water Rescue Training

Pillows

When a rock is close to the waters surface the water hits the top of it, forcing it upwards. This creates a “pillow” of water downstream of the rock.

The more submerged a rock is, the further downstream the pillow will be. If the rock is very close to the surface the pillow will be right on top of it. With enough experience, you will be able to tell when a rock is close to the surface or not by the type of pillow it creates.

8 White Water Swimming Skills, Survival Fitness Plan Water Rescue Training

If the rock is out of the water then the pillow becomes a cushion. This is due to the water flowing up against it. When the current is strong enough, it may form a series of compression waves.

9 White Water Swimming Skills, Survival Fitness Plan Water Rescue Training

Rapids

A rapid is a turbulent section of water created by faster flowing water over obstacles, such as rocks. These obstacles may or may not break the water’s surface. This faster water is due to an increased gradient and/or a constriction in the channel.

To negotiate a rapid, look for a downstream “V” in the water (the bottom of the V pointing downstream). This indicates an unobstructed flow of water. In most cases, it will be the preferred path of passage.

10 White Water Swimming Skills, Survival Fitness Plan Water Rescue Training

Rocks

Apart from being a cause for other types of obstructions, the rock itself can present danger. Avoid these obstructions altogether by entering the water downstream of them.

Walking on slippery rocks (or any slippery surface) near water is never a good idea.

Rocks under the water’s surface can become foot entrapments. It is very dangerous and is one of the main reasons to keep your feet up in the defensive position.

When in the water heading towards a rock, use the defensive position as described before.

If you get pinned up against a rock, lean downstream to get loose.

Rocks are not all bad. They may serve as a lifeline to hold onto. They can also create eddies which can be safe havens in turbulent waters.

Sweepers and Strainers

Strainers are objects in the water that allow water to pass through them but not objects. They can be natural like branches, or artificial such as wire fences.

A sweeper is a strainer that hangs low over or into the water.

Both of these things can impede your safe passage, and they often double as entrapments.

11 White Water Swimming Skills, Survival Fitness Plan Water Rescue Training

When swimming into a strainer is unavoidable, maneuver into the aggressive swimming position. Swim hard to launch yourself up and onto (or over) the obstruction.

12 White Water Swimming Skills, Survival Fitness Plan Water Rescue Training

When forced below the surface swim downstream using your hands in front of you to part the branches.

If your legs get tangled in long weeds swim downstream using only your arms.

Like friendly rocks, sometimes sweepers (not strainers) can serve as a lifeline. You might be able to use them to climb to shore.

Undercut Rocks

An undercut rock is one where the water flows below it as opposed to around. The water’s current can drag the swimmer underneath it and pin him there.

Normal river features acting strangely are good indications of an undercut rock, e.g.,

  • The pillow or cushion is missing
  • There is a boil (where the water is not flowing down or upstream) on the downstream side of the obstacle.
  • The eddy has weak (or missing) lines and/or an abnormal current flow.

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Water Debris

Water debris is anything floating in the water. It can be either natural or unnatural, such as seaweed, logs, trash, etc.

Keep an eye out for these things and avoid them as they can become entrapments.

If there is a lot of debris, such as lots of seaweed, try to avoid it. If you must go through it then crawl over the top by grasping at it with overhand movements. When you are in a group put the strongest person first. He will create a path through the debris for the others to follow.

Manmade pools created behind dams often have many stumps lying below the surface. This is due to the cutting of trees before the flooding of the lowlands.

People

Other people can be a hazard, although more often they are a good thing in a survival situation.
When in open water there are more recreational hazards. Surfers, jet-skis, boats, etc. Stay away from areas in which these activities take place. If available, use the designated swimming areas instead.

Pollution

Another by-product of people is pollution. Water systems are often used as a dumping ground for all sorts of human and industrial waste.

Swimming in polluted waters may not have an immediate effect, but it could result in illness later.



Photo Credit: By DoD photo by Staff Sgt. Tim Chacon, U.S. Air Force. (Released) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

Practice these white water swimming skills in a safe environment. White water pools are good. To enhance your white water rafting swimming ability, join a white water swim club.

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Universal Knife Defense Techniques http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/universal-knife-defense-techniques/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/universal-knife-defense-techniques/#respond Mon, 09 Apr 2018 01:59:11 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=13966 Universal knife defense techniques are those that you can use at any time. It doesn’t matter which foot you step in with, which block and/or grab you use, or what angle the attack is. There are 2 universal knife disarming techniques. Here is how you can use each of them against the four angles of
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Universal knife defense techniques are those that you can use at any time. It doesn’t matter which foot you step in with, which block and/or grab you use, or what angle the attack is. There are 2 universal knife disarming techniques. Here is how you can use each of them against the four angles of attack. These knife defense techniques are part of Vortex Control Self-Defense.


The information in this post is from “The Vortex Control Self-Defense Bundle” by Sam Fury.

Universal Knife Defense Techniques

Universals 1A

Your opponent attacks with a right downward thrust. Defend with a left bong sau and right underhand grab.

Guide your opponent’s arm down as you curl your left hand towards you and then on top of your opponent’s upper arm.

You may choose to strike your opponent in the face.

1 Universal Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

Continue to hook down inside your opponent’s guard with your left arm until you grab your own right forearm.

2 Universal Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

Drive your right elbow into your opponent’s face and then grip the top of the knife with your left hand.

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Release your right hand and move it away so you can pry the knife out of your opponent’s hand. Pry it towards the outside of his guard.

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Universals 1B

Your opponent attacks with a left downward thrust. Defend with a left chop and right underhand grip.

Use your left to strike your opponent.

5 Universal Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

Continue to hook down inside your opponent’s guard with your left arm until you grab your own right forearm.

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Continue the disarm as previously described.

Universals 1C

Your opponent attacks with a right straight thrust. Defend with a right chop and left overhand grip.

Pass your opponent’s right arm between your two bodies.

As you do this your right hand adopts an overhand grip on your opponent’s wrist. At the same time, your left-hand strikes him in the face.

7 Universal Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

Continue the disarm as previously described. Your right hand can stay in an overhand grip.

Universals 1D

Your opponent attacks with a left straight thrust. Defend with a left chop and right overhand grip.

Use your right hand to raise your opponent’s arm a little so you can curl your left arm under.

8 Universal Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

Perform the disarm as previously described.

Universals 2A

Your opponent attacks with a right downward stab. Defend using a left bong sau and a right underhand grip.

As you guide your opponent’s arm down, curl your left arm so it ends on top of his right elbow.

9 Universal Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

Pass your left hand between your opponent’s arm and torso to grab the back of his shoulder. Your right hand moves your opponent’s arm back at the same time so you stay clear of the knife.

10 Universal Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

Use your left hand to apply downward pressure on your opponent’s shoulder to lock it in place.

Let go of your right hand. Bring it over your opponent’s shoulder and grab his right wrist using an underhand grip.

11 Universal Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

Pull your opponent’s wrist towards his right shoulder to apply the lock/break and then take the knife.

Universals 2B

Your opponent attacks with a left downward stab. Defend with a left chop and right overhand grip.

From there bring your opponent’s arm down and perform the disarm as previously described.

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Universals 2C

Your opponent attacks with a right straight thrust. Defend with a right chop and a left overhand grab.

Step to your left so you are on the outside of your opponent’s guard. As you do this adopt an overhand grip on your opponent’s wrist with your right hand.

Once you have a good grip with your left hand, use your right arm to pass between your opponent’s arm and body.

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Continue to apply the disarm as previously described.

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Universals 2D

Your opponent attacks with a left straight thrust. Defend using a left chop and right overhand grab.

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Pass your left arm between your opponent’s arm and body. Continue to apply the disarm as previously described.

16 Universal Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training



Photo Credit: Senior Airman Nathan Clark. Cropped.

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Safe Water Entries – Water Safety Training http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/safe-water-entries/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/safe-water-entries/#respond Sun, 08 Apr 2018 02:55:38 +0000 https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=16171 Learn safe water entries as part of water safety training. They are also useful basic water rescue techniques. You can use these water entries in group water safety classes or for personal training. They are good water safety activities for children and adults alike. GET YOUR FREE SWIM WORKOUTS AND WATER RESCUE SKILLS SCHEDULE The
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Learn safe water entries as part of water safety training. They are also useful basic water rescue techniques. You can use these water entries in group water safety classes or for personal training. They are good water safety activities for children and adults alike.


The information in this post is from the book “Swim Workouts and Water Rescue Skills” by Sam Fury.

Safe Water Entries

What is the safest way to enter the water?

The answer to this question depends on the circumstance. In general, you should always enter shallow or unknown waters feet first. Unknown waters are when you are unsure of the water depth, and/or if you can’t see what lays beneath the surface.

When practicing pool or open water swimming safety, be sure to follow all water safety rules. Having a water safety instructor present is a good idea.

Wade Entry

When possible, the wade entry is the best way to enter unknown waters.

It is entering the water with a slow walk. Feel your way forward with your feet until the water is chest deep, then start to swim.

Slide Entry

Use the slide entry for shallow or unknown waters with a steep angled edge, such as a pool edge. It is also useful in crowded areas since it is easier to control than other entry methods.

The slide entry is very simple. Sit down with your feet/legs hanging down into (or above) the water. Use your hands to slide yourself into the water.

For shallow waters, once your feet are firm, continue forward using the wade entry.

1 Safe Water Entries - Survival Fitness Plan Water Safety Training

If speed is a factor and you plan to push off the wall once you are in the water, don’t push too hard during the slide entry. If you are too far away from the edge you won’t be able to do a good push off, which is where your initial propulsion comes from.

Step-off Entry

When entering shallow or unknown waters, and you are too high for a slide entry, use the step-off.

Step off your platform into the water. Keep your knees flexed and be ready to absorb any impact in case you hit the floor.

You can then wade or swim depending on the situation.

2 Safe Water Entries - Survival Fitness Plan Water Safety Training

Stride Entry

Only use the stride entry when you know the water is at least 1.5 meters deep, and the slide entry is not appropriate. This is the best method to use when jumping into deep waters.

One of the big advantages of the stride entry is that you keep your head above the water. This means you can keep your sight on something, such as a drowning victim.

Put your arms out to your sides and step one foot out in front of you. Planted your foot well so you don’t slip. Keep looking at your target the whole time.

Look up a little as you lean forward into the water.

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Slap your hands down as you hit the water.

Looking up and slapping down helps to keep your head above the water.

4 Safe Water Entries - Survival Fitness Plan Water Safety Training

High-Level Entry

This is good to use when you have to enter the water from a height of 3+ meters. You must be sure that the water depth is appropriate for the height you are jumping from. Also ensure that your landing zone is a large enough area-wise, i.e., length and width.

Unlike all the previous entry methods, the high-level entry is not safe to do while carrying gear. If you have a backpack or anything else, throw it in before jumping.

Consider wearing long clothing as it will help protect your body.

Take a large breath and jump away from the surface. You don’t want to hit anything on the way down.

Cross your ankles and place your hands in fists in front of your thighs. This puts your arms down and close to your body.

Bend your knees a little.

Look straight ahead at the horizon and arch your back. Looking down or up will cause you to lean forward or back respectively. Arching your back will help keep you straight. You want to hit the water as vertical and straight as possible.

Allow your knees to flex once you hit the water. This will help slow you down.

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Height vs Water Depth

The higher your jumping-off platform, the deeper the water needs to be.

The best way to judge is if you have seen others do it, and even then you must be very careful.

Note: All these calculations are only approximate so it is easy to do them in your head. The results are good enough to use.

Start with at least 2.5 meters (m) of water depth. If you’re jumping from higher than 1.5 m you need to add an extra 0.6 m of depth for every 3 m increase in height.

Calculating Height

A simple but effective way to calculate your height from the water is to drop something into it. Any solid object that won’t catch air will work, like a rock. Time how long it takes to hit the water.

Multiply that number by itself, and then multiply that answer by 16, i.e., (x⌃2) x 16.

This gives you the approximate height in feet. Multiply it by 0.3 to convert it into meters.

Calculating Water Depth

Get a long stick (or something similar) and put it in the water until it hits the floor. Measure how much of it got wet.

This is easy in theory but hard in practice.



Photo Credit: Senior Airman Katie Spencer.

In this article, you learned water entry techniques for swimming and water safety. They are also useful for performing life saving techniques in water.

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How to do a 50m Underwater Swim – Part 2: Underwater Swimming Technique http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/50m-underwater-swim-technique/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/50m-underwater-swim-technique/#respond Thu, 05 Apr 2018 10:10:56 +0000 https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=16153 Learn how to do a 50m underwater swim. This is the 2nd part of how to swim underwater longer. It will teach you an underwater swimming technique for beginners. It is not the fastest way to swim underwater, but if you want to swim 50 meters underwater, then this is the stroke for you. GET
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Learn how to do a 50m underwater swim. This is the 2nd part of how to swim underwater longer. It will teach you an underwater swimming technique for beginners. It is not the fastest way to swim underwater, but if you want to swim 50 meters underwater, then this is the stroke for you.


The information in this post is from the book “Swim Workouts and Water Rescue Skills” by Sam Fury.


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How to do a 50m Underwater Swim

This post covers stage 4 and 5 of the 50 meter underwater swim training. If you haven’t already, please read the post on Breath Hold Training which covers stages 1, 2, and 3. It also has VERY important safety information.

Stage Four – Efficient Stroke

This teaches the best technique for how to swim farther underwater. The only aim is to learn the stroke. Don’t try to break any underwater swimming record.

DID YOU KNOW? The Guinness Book Record for the longest underwater swim is 200m by Tom Sietas (German).

This underwater swimming stroke uses a modified breast-stroke with the underwater dolphin kick. Do it as one fluid motion. This is also how to swim underwater without floating up.

Start off in a streamlined glide and stay in it for as long as possible.

1 How to do a 50m Underwater Swim, Survival Fitness Plan Survival Swimming Training

When you are almost to a complete stop, turn your palms out and separate your hands. Do the out-sweep of the breast-stroke. Use webbed finger as described in the freestyle post (under the heading Catch). Allow your legs to float up, the higher the better. Keep your head down.

2 How to do a 50m Underwater Swim, Survival Fitness Plan Survival Swimming Training

As you do the breaststroke arm movement, arch your body extending your back and shoulders. You aim is to make your body like a spring which you will snap down to propel you forward.

3 How to do a 50m Underwater Swim, Survival Fitness Plan Survival Swimming Training

Bring your arms and forearms into a vertical position, elbows facing up. Snap your arms and legs down together.

4 How to do a 50m Underwater Swim, Survival Fitness Plan Survival Swimming Training

Your legs/torso do the underwater dolphin kick technique. Your arms go into a double arm pull stroke by pushing against the water down along your body. Remember your webbed fingers.

5 How to do a 50m Underwater Swim, Survival Fitness Plan Survival Swimming Training

Keep your arms vertical for as long as you can and end in a streamline position with your arms by your sides. Glide in this position for as long as you can.

6 How to do a 50m Underwater Swim, Survival Fitness Plan Survival Swimming Training

Do a standard breaststroke frog kick. At the same time bring your hands back into the streamline glide you started in, with your arms/hands in front of you.

7 How to do a 50m Underwater Swim, Survival Fitness Plan Survival Swimming Training

Repeat this sequence. When you start to run out of breath go into your preferred surface stroke. Combat side stroke or freestyle is best.


Stage 5 – 50 Meters Underwater Swim

Revise the safety pointers!

Before attempting this final stage you should be able to:

  • Swim a 25m underwater swim in under 30 seconds and using 5 strokes or less.
  • Hold your breath for at least 90 seconds while walking on dry land.

The first part of stage 5 is to build up your breath holding ability while moving on dry land.

Hold your breath while doing SFP Super-Burpees for a minute. When you can do 6 in a minute you are ready to attempt the navy seal 50 meter underwater swim.



This concludes the training for how to swim longer underwater. There are other underwater swimming strokes, but they are not as efficient. You can even use this technique to conquer the Navy Seal underwater swim for distance test.

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Stick Combat Cutting Strikes http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/stick-combat-cutting-strikes/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/stick-combat-cutting-strikes/#respond Sat, 31 Mar 2018 06:59:25 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=14019 Learn 3 stick combat cutting strikes used in Vortex Control Self-Defense. They stem from Kali stick fighting and Escrima stick fighting. Both of these are Filipino stick fighting martial arts. Cutting strikes are stick fighting techniques that you follow through on. Like a slash with a sword. This is as opposed to stopping or bouncing
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Learn 3 stick combat cutting strikes used in Vortex Control Self-Defense. They stem from Kali stick fighting and Escrima stick fighting. Both of these are Filipino stick fighting martial arts. Cutting strikes are stick fighting techniques that you follow through on. Like a slash with a sword. This is as opposed to stopping or bouncing off when you make contact. The strikes in this post include the backhand to the head, forehand to the knee, and the backhand to the knee.


The information in this post is from “The Vortex Control Self-Defense Bundle” by Sam Fury.


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Stick Combat Cutting Strikes

When practicing these Philipino stick fighting strikes, stand a little wider than shoulder width. Lead with your strong side and have your body at 45° to your target. Point your feet toward your enemy.

Practice using circular forces. Roll your strikes using your waist. The power and majority of movement come from body motion, not your arm.

Using your arm and wrist lacks power. It is good for the sport to get fast points but not very effective on the street. Big hits end fights.

These strikes are short range. Do not extend your arm too much. You may get more distance but it loses power at your shoulder. It will also make it easier for your opponent to manipulate/grab your stick and/or arm.

Aim to hit your target with the top couple of inches of your stick. The strikes go through your opponent in a cutting motion.

Backhand to the Head

Start with the stick on your left side to the top of your left shoulder. Strike diagonal and down across your body to your bottom right.

1 Stick Fighting Cutting Strikes, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

Forehand to Knee

Bring the stick up to shoulder height and squat down to lower your body. Strike down at your opponent’s knee.

2 Stick Fighting Cutting Strikes, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

Backhand to Knee

Raise the stick up to your left shoulder. Stay low.

3 Stick Fighting Cutting Strikes, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

Do a backhand strike to your opponent’s knee.

4 Stick Fighting Cutting Strikes, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

You can learn other single stick fighting strikes in the following posts:



Photo Credit: Matt Cloutier via Flickr.com

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Breath Hold Training – Learn to Swim 50+ Meters Underwater: Part 1 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/breath-hold-training/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/breath-hold-training/#respond Wed, 28 Mar 2018 10:51:20 +0000 https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=16147 How long can you hold your breath? The average human can hold their breath for about 2 minutes. With this breath hold training, you will be able to do it for 5+ minutes. This training focuses on how to hold your breath longer underwater. In the Survival Fitness Plan, you combine it with an efficient
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How long can you hold your breath? The average human can hold their breath for about 2 minutes. With this breath hold training, you will be able to do it for 5+ minutes. This training focuses on how to hold your breath longer underwater. In the Survival Fitness Plan, you combine it with an efficient swimming stroke. Your aim is to swim 50+ meters underwater.


The information in this post is from the book “Swim Workouts and Water Rescue Skills” by Sam Fury.


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Breath Hold Training

This post is stages 1, 2, and 3 of long-distance underwater swimming training. It will teach you how to hold your breath longer. Start with increasing your current breath holding ability. You then advance to static apnea training. Static apnea training is what free-divers use to increase their lung capacity.

Underwater Swimming Safety Tips

Important! Breath holding training is dangerous! Read, understand, and follow the following safety guidelines.

  • Train with a partner, and not at the same time. Your friend must watch you so he can help if something goes wrong. If you must train alone, then at the very least make sure there is a lifeguard present.
  • Stay in shallow water, especially to begin with.
  • Never push yourself to beat your last time or distance. Only hold your breath for as much as comfortable. Trying to beat yourself will have an adverse effect anyway. You’re much better off staying relaxed and seeing where you “pop-up”.
  • If you begin to panic at any moment, relax and surface.
  • Listen to your body. If you get light headed, your vision begins to fade, or you get any other abnormal sensation, swim to the surface immediately.
  • Work on your lung capacity on dry land and concentrate more on efficient stroke when you’re in the water.

Stage One – Dry Land Breath Holding

Practice holding your breath for longer periods of time while on dry land.

In the Survival Fitness Plan, we use minimal preparation for breath holding. This is so you know how far you can get in emergency situations. Breathe in, breathe out, breathe in, then go.

Take these breaths slowly from deep within your diaphragm. This is to rid your lungs of low-quality air (CO2).

Tip: You know you’re using correct breathing if your belly is moving up and down rather than your shoulders. When your chest and shoulders move it means you’re breathing with only the top part of your lungs. This deep breathing is also useful for recovery after a workout.

Here are more detailed instructions for the inhale, exhale, inhale, sequence.

Whilst doing the following, relax your muscles and remain as still and as calm as possible. This includes not “clock watching” which will make you anxious. The more relaxed and still you are, the less oxygen your body will consume.

  • Breathe in for a count of 5 seconds, hold it for 1 second, then breathe out for a count of 10 seconds.
  • When exhaling, push out every last drop of air, and push your tongue up against your teeth. This forms a valve which helps to control the release of air. Your breath should make a hissing sound as you exhale.
  • Inhale slowly to about 80-85% capacity. Start at the bottom near your diaphragm, then up into your sternum, and finally into your chest.
  • Hold your breath for as long as you can, and when you first start to feel the need to breathe, swallow a little spit. This helps to relax your breathing reflex.
  • When you need to breathe out, let out little puffs of air at a time.
  • When you’re finished, push out as much air as possible to get rid of any extra carbon dioxide.

Don’t try this sequence again until you get your body back to normal oxygen levels. Breathe steadily for at least 5 minutes and don’t do it more than 3 times in a single session. Only do one session a day.

After a few practice sessions try adding in slow movements, such as walking. This will prepare your body to dive and swim with less air.

Stage Two – Static Underwater Breath Holding

Stage two is the same as stage one, but underwater. The point of this stage is to get you comfortable holding your breath underwater.

Inhale, exhale fully, inhale to 80% capacity, then hold and submerge.

Keep your mouth and nose closed while underwater. Use your fingers to hold your nose shut if you need.

Stay relaxed, and once you are near your limit, resurface. Blow out any extra air as you rise so that you can take a fresh breath immediately.

Stage Three – Static Apnea Training

In this stage, you will use static apnea training. This conditions your lungs and body to withstand the effects of prolonged breath-holding.

This stage is ongoing. You can move on to stage 4 while doing it.

IMPORTANT: This is a dry land activity. DO NOT try it underwater!

There are two separate programs for static apnea training. One conditions your CO2 tolerance. The other increases the amount of oxygen your lungs can store.

Each program has its own training table. The recovery stage is when you can breathe — breath normal for the allocated time. During the breath hold stage, hold your breath for the allocated time.

Only start O2 tolerance training once you can hold your breath for at least 90 seconds.

You can do both CO2 and O2 sessions on the same day, but do not do them immediately after one another. Do one in the morning and one at night.

Do not do more than one training session of each per day.

CO2 Tolerance

CO2 tolerance training consists of a series of alternating breath-holds and rest periods. Your breathing time gets less and less while your breath holding stays the same.

Start off with a breath-hold period that you’re comfortable with. 50-70% of your capability is good. Add 5 or 10 seconds each day.

This table represents one training session, i.e., you recover and breath hold 8 times. Use the same breath hold time for each one. In your next training session (the following day), you increase your breath hold time by 5 or 10 seconds.

1 CO2 Tolerance Table, Breath Hold Training, Survival Fitness Plan Survival Swimming Training

O2 Tolerance

In O2 tolerance training, your recovery period stays the same. Instead, you increase your breath holding.

Only start O2 tolerance training once you can hold your breath for at least 90 seconds.

This table represents one training session.

2 O2 Tolerance Table, Breath Hold Training, Survival Fitness Plan Survival Swimming Training

Additional Ways to Increase your Breath Holding Ability

There are some other things you can do to increase your breath holding ability:

  • Exercise often.
  • Lose weight (if you are overweight).
  • Learn to play a wind or brass instrument.
  • Take up singing.
  • Don’t do drugs, especially smoking!

Body Response Information

Important! This is for informational purposes. DO NOT practice/experiment with it.

When you hold your breath for an extended period of time your body goes through three response stages.

  1. Convulsions. When you first get an urge to take a breath and you don’t, you will have convulsions in your diaphragm. You can learn to fight through this, and if you do then you will gain a couple of minutes before you need to breathe.
  2. Spleen Release. If you fight through the convulsions your spleen responds by releasing oxygen-rich blood. Your body will calm down and you will get a surge of energy. Use this energy to get somewhere that you can breathe!
  3. Blackout. If you do not find fresh oxygen you will black out, and if you are underwater at the time you will drown.



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How to do Combat Side Stroke http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/combat-side-stroke/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/combat-side-stroke/#respond Wed, 21 Mar 2018 02:44:09 +0000 https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=16122 Learn how to do Combat Side Stroke. The Navy Seals developed the Combat Side Stroke (CSS) as a stealth and efficient way of swimming long-distance. It is a mix of freestyle, breaststroke, and sidestroke. GET YOUR FREE SWIM WORKOUTS AND WATER RESCUE SKILLS SCHEDULE The information in this post is from the book “Swim Workouts
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Learn how to do Combat Side Stroke. The Navy Seals developed the Combat Side Stroke (CSS) as a stealth and efficient way of swimming long-distance. It is a mix of freestyle, breaststroke, and sidestroke.


The information in this post is from the book “Swim Workouts and Water Rescue Skills” by Sam Fury.


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How to do Combat Side Stroke

There are 4 basic stages to the CSS. The streamline position, two catch and pull movements, and the recovery. The recovery involves a scissor kick paired with a breaststroke-like arm movement.

Note: A lot of the terminology used in this chapter is explained in the freestyle section.

Streamline Position

Get some initial propulsion and adopt the streamline position.

1 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

First Catch and Pull

Do your first catch by pressing the palm of your top hand down. If you are rolling to your right then your right hand is/will be on top. Bend your arm at the elbow.

Ensure to keep your arm aligned at a downward angle. Your shoulder is at the top, your elbow below that, then your wrist, and finally your fingers at the bottom. Doing this will maximize your first pull.

2 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

Continue the catch as you rotate onto your side. Your forearm is vertical, elbow above your wrist.
Stay on your side until your recovery stage.

3 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

Flow into the pull by continuing the movement of your top arm until your hand is in line with your upper thigh. Your hand follows your midline. Be careful not to raise your elbow too high.

At this stage, your arm is almost fully extended. Do not let your hand come out of the water.

Now is a good time to take a breath. When you exhale, do so in a slow and steady manner.

4 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

Second Catch and Pull

Start your second catch and pull with your other arm by sweeping it down. Your palm faces down and stays fixed in that position. As you sweep down it creates resistance against the water, propelling you forward.

5 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

When your arm is vertical, your palm will be facing to your rear.

6 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

Continue the arc of your bottom arm until your hand is on your thigh.

7 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

The catch, pull, and recovery of your lower arm is almost identical to a breaststroke motion.

Note: As you do the second pull you can either leave your head up breathing or look back down. If you have a tendency to sink you are better off looking back down.

Recovery

Start the recovery with a simultaneous scissor kick and arm movement.

Bring both your arms up through the center-line of your body. They then travel back into the streamline position, like breaststroke. Keep your arms and hands underwater and as close to your body as possible.

8 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

Continue your arms forward past your face as you do the scissor kick. Finish in the streamlined position.

9 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

Scissor Kick

Do the scissor kick as you bring your arms forward. This helps with propulsion and corkscrew’s your body back into the streamline position.

Move your top leg forward and your bottom leg backward at the same time. Bring them back together in the streamlined position. Keep your toes flexed towards your shin until you adopt the streamlined position.

Draw your top knee up so there is a 90º angle at your hip and knee. At the same time, bend your bottom leg back at the knee.

10 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

Extend the lower part of your top leg in front of your torso as you kick your bottom leg back.

11 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

Point your toes once you have extended your legs, then draw them into the streamline position.

12 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

Slowly exhale as you glide in the streamline position. Be sure to get the most out of the glide before starting the next arm cycle.

If speed is more important you can flutter kick before initiating your first pull again. You could also use the sprinter’s CSS.

Sprinter’s CSS

Use the sprinter’s CSS when you need to go faster. The tradeoff is that you will use more energy since will use a greater stroke count over the same distance.

To do the sprinter’s CSS do a half stroke on your second pull. Everything else stays the same.

From the start of the second pull, bring your arm down as normal until it is almost at a right angle to your body.

13 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

Instead of pulling it all the way to your thigh, scoop it up into your armpit.

14 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

From here, push it forward into a full extension as normal.

Guide Stroke

Use the guide stroke to check your direction when using the CSS to swim a long distance.

It uses a breaststroke-type movement for your arms and the dolphin kick for your legs.

Start in the streamline position. Push your palms out against the water to a position a little wider than your shoulders.

15 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

Press your palms against the water as you rotate your hands and lower arms into a vertical position. Your finger-tips point down and your palms angle toward your chest.

Pull your palms towards your chest. This creates forward propulsion and allows you to raise your head above the surface. Now you can breathe and look around.

Try not to lift your head too far out of the water. This will cause your hips and legs to sink, which will decrease your momentum.

16 How to do Combat Side Stroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

Recover your arms back to the streamline position as you would with breast-stroke. Keep them close to your body along your centerline.

As you recover your arms, use the downward motion of the dolphin kick. This helps with propulsion back into the streamline position. From here you can continue into CSS or another guide stroke.

Note: For more instruction on the dolphin kick, see the underwater fly-kick section.

If you get disorientated, tread water until you figure out which direction you need to swim in.



Photo Credit: By Cpl. Christina Oneil (https://www.dvidshub.net/image/1254958) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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Group A Knife Defense Techniques http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/group-a-knife-defense-techniques/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/group-a-knife-defense-techniques/#respond Sat, 17 Mar 2018 02:03:47 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=13875 Group A knife defense techniques take the knife away from your attacker. They all follow a similar pattern. Block/Grab. Hand/thumb grab. Create a “tap” (or twist the limb). Disarm your opponent. GET YOUR FREE SELF-DEFENSE TRAINING SCHEDULES The information in this post is from “The Vortex Control Self-Defense Bundle” by Sam Fury. GET YOUR COPY
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Group A knife defense techniques take the knife away from your attacker. They all follow a similar pattern.

  1. Block/Grab.
  2. Hand/thumb grab.
  3. Create a “tap” (or twist the limb).
  4. Disarm your opponent.


The information in this post is from “The Vortex Control Self-Defense Bundle” by Sam Fury.


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Group A Knife Defense Techniques

These knife defense techniques are part of Vortex Control Self-Defense. Some modified versions of them are also used in SFPSD Weapons Disarms Training.

A1

Your opponent attacks with a right downward stab. Step in and block with your right using bong sau. At almost the same time, grab your opponent’s wrist using an underhand grip.

Without losing contact with your opponent’s arm, use your right hand to grab his right hand. Grab the thumb as much as you can.

As you do this turn your body so you are facing to your left.

1 Group A Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

Bring your opponent’s arm hard against your torso at about the height of your solar plexus. If you haven’t already, get a good grip on his thumb with your right hand.

Use your left hand to pry the knife out of your opponent’s grip.

2 Group A Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

A2

Your opponent attacks with a left downward stab. Block with your left using a chop. Your right grabs your opponent’s wrist using an underhand grip.

Use your left hand to grab your opponent’s hand. Grab the thumb as much as you can.

3 Group A Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

As you turn to your left draw your elbows into your body and bring your opponent’s hand close to your chest.

Use your right hand to grab the knife and pry it out of your opponent’s hand.

4 Group A Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

A3

Your opponent attacks with a right straight thrust. Defend with a right chop and left underhand grab.

Use your left hand to grab your opponent’s hand and bend his wrist down.

5 Group A Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

Without letting go of your hands, turn to your right so you are facing your opponent. This “untwists” you and leaves your opponent’s elbow and hand facing up.

Pry the knife toward your opponent to disarm him.

6 Group A Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

A4

Your opponent attacks with a left straight thrust. Chop block with your left hand and use an underhand grip with your right.

7 Group A Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

Use your left hand to grab your opponent’s thumb and then bring his hand up vertical.

8 Group A Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training

Bend your opponent’s hand to the outside of his guard into a wrist lock and then use your left hand to pry the knife out.

9 Group A Knife Defense Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Training



Photo Credit: Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano. Cropped.

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How to do Survival Backstroke http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/how-to-do-survival-backstroke/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/how-to-do-survival-backstroke/#respond Wed, 14 Mar 2018 01:35:22 +0000 https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=16116 Learn how to do survival backstroke for swimming long distance in a survival situation. Survival backstroke is floating on your back as you propel through the water. You use a simultaneous frog/breaststroke kick and a sculling motion with your hands. Your arms and legs move and come together at the same time. GET YOUR FREE
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Learn how to do survival backstroke for swimming long distance in a survival situation. Survival backstroke is floating on your back as you propel through the water. You use a simultaneous frog/breaststroke kick and a sculling motion with your hands. Your arms and legs move and come together at the same time.


The information in this post is from the book “Swim Workouts and Water Rescue Skills” by Sam Fury.

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How to do Survival Backstroke

The main goal of the survival backstroke is to conserve energy and reduce heat loss.

To maximize energy conservation, do the survival backstroke very slow. Take short strokes and glide for as long as possible. Only take the next stroke when you feel your legs dropping or you loose forward momentum.

1 How to do Survival Backstroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

Taking short strokes minimizes heat loss from under your armpits and between your legs. Your arms should not extend beyond your shoulders. Also, at the end of each stroke, bring your arms and legs together. Hold them close but comfortable against your body.

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Also use the survival backstroke is if an underwater explosion is likely. You will want to go faster so you can escape the blast, so make your strokes larger. Take your next stroke sooner than normal, but not too soon. Make the most out of your streamlined glide position while achieving the most speed.

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Photo Credit: Lance Cpl. Caleb McDonald.

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