Survival Fitness Plan https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com Train to Survive Any Situation Fri, 16 Nov 2018 13:26:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 Basic Water Rescue Training Online https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/basic-water-rescue-training-online/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/basic-water-rescue-training-online/#respond Wed, 10 Oct 2018 17:32:10 +0000 https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=21880 In this article you will learn various types of lifeguard rescues and swift water rescue and recovery. The information in this water rescue article does NOT replace professional water rescue training.  Treat it as water rescue guidelines or as water rescue training drills to use for any water rescue training situation such as: Flood water […]

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In this article you will learn various types of lifeguard rescues and swift water rescue and recovery.

The information in this water rescue article does NOT replace professional water rescue training. 

Treat it as water rescue guidelines or as water rescue training drills to use for any water rescue training situation such as:

  • Flood water rescue training
  • Open water rescue training
  • Swift water rescue training
  • White water rescue training

Contents

  • How to Assess a Water Rescue Scenario
    • When You See a Water Rescue Victim
    • Situational Assessment
    • Casualty Priorities and Recognition
    • Making a Plan
  • Land-Based Water Rescue Techniques
    • Shout and Signal
    • Throw Rescue
    • Reach Rescue
  • Water-Based Water Rescue Techniques
    • Wading Rescue
    • Boat Rescue
    • Swim with an Aid
    • Tow Rescues
      • Armpit Tow
      • Single Armpit Tow
      • Double Armpit Tow
      • Cross Chest Carry
      • Vice Grip Rollover and Tow
  • How to Defend Yourself Against a Drowning Victim
    • General Defense
    • Block
    • Wrist/Arm Grab Escape
    • Head Hold Escape
  • Swift Water Rescues Using Rope
    • Land Rope Rescues
      • Pendulum Rescue
      • Stabilization Line
      • Kiwi Cinch
    • Swimming Rope Rescues
      • Simple Rope Tether
      • Tethered Swimmer
  • Conclusion

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Basic Water Rescue Techniques

Water Rescue Basics – How to Assess a Water Rescue Scenario

This section covers the 10-20 system, prioritizing casualties, planning a rescue, and steps that anyone can follow when they see someone that needs help in the water.

When You See a Water Rescue Victim

Anyone can use the following passive water rescue steps. It is simple water rescue policy you can teach your friends and family, including children.

  • Keep calm. A person who panics cannot think clear.
  • Shout for help as loud as you can.
  • Ask everyone else to clear the area.
  • Ensure there will be no immediate danger to you while attempting the rescue. Animals, electricity, fire, etc.
  • Use land-based rescue techniques in the order given.
  • If you cannot perform a land-based rescue, call the emergency services.

IMPORTANT: Unless trained in water rescue protocol, never enter the water to save a victim. A drowning victim can pull you down with him. Even when trained, entering the water is a last resort.

Water Rescue Operations – Situational Assessment

The 10:20 System
When you manage the well-being of others near water, you can use the 10:20 system. It is a good way to oversee a designated area. 

The 10 stands for 10 seconds. You scan the designated area (e.g., a pool) from one side to the other in 10 seconds. 

The 20 means you should be less than 20 seconds away from getting to any swimmer in your area.

Water Rescue Skills – Casualty Priorities and Recognition

This chapter explains the different water casualties. 

When there is over one victim, rescue them in the order given.

Casualty Priorities
The general rule of thumb is to rescue those making the least noise first and the unconscious last.

The 4 types of casualties in order of rescue priority are:

  1. Conscious non-swimmers. Unable to swim and often vertical in the water. They may grab hold and drag you down.
  2. Conscious weak swimmers. Can swim but either exhausted or in some other distress. Usually in a forward position trying to swim. Often cooperative in a rescue.
  3. Conscious injured swimmers. Can keep themselves afloat but have an injury they may or may not tell you about. Look if they are holding their injury and be careful of it during the rescue.
  4. Unconscious swimmers. Often floating motionless and face down in the water, but can be at any depth.

Rescue the unconscious victim last. You do not want to waste time you could spend rescuing a victim with a higher chance of survival. 

Recognizing a Distressed Swimmer
A distressed swimmer is any conscious swimmer that is having trouble in the water. If he does not find safety he can become an unconscious swimmer. You must learn how to recognize the distressed swimmer so you can rescue them before it is too late. 

There are 2 basic types of swimmers in distress: non-panicking or panicking.
 
The non-panicking casualty knows they need help to get to safety. They will try to communicate this to you. 

A panicking casualty is likely to already be in the drowning phase. He will thrash around trying to keep afloat. He may try to communicate (either silent or noisy) but it will be ineffective.

Water Rescue Drills – Making a Plan

It is very important to create a plan of rescue instead of acting straight away. 

The human brain can process a lot of information at great speed, even in high-stress situations. 

Once you recognize a casualty, it will only take a few seconds to assess the situation. This will keep you safe and will also give the victim the best chance of survival. 

The first thing you should look for is danger. Why is the victim in trouble in the first place? Is the danger still there?

Next, consider your victim’s profile. Is he/she big, small, an adult, child, unconscious, panicked, injured, etc?

Finally, what basic water rescue equipment do you have, and/or what can you improvise?

Use the information you gather and the knowledge of your own abilities to decide the best form of rescue. 

Due to the endless possibilities of scenarios you will need to be very flexible. For example, should you take the time to find a rescue aid? And if so, which water rescue aid is best for the situation?

Types of Water Rescue Techniques – Land-Based

Land-based rescue techniques are safe to use by almost anyone. Here they are in escalating order, i.e., only use the second one if the first doesn’t work.

Watch the victim as much as possible while preparing his rescue. This way, if he goes under you can tell others the best place to look. 

If a second person is there have him watch the victim while you find equipment and/or help.

Shout and Signal

Your victim may be in a panic. Sometimes giving simple instructions will be enough for him to save himself. 

Get his attentional by waving and shouting. Then, in a loud, clear voice, tell him to kick his legs and push towards you or the nearest safe spot (waters edge, shallow water, etc.).

Throw Rescue

Look for something the victim can use to float on and throw it to him. 

The object must be small enough for you to throw but buoyant enough for the casualty to use as a float. 

Aim it so the victim can reach it, but do not hit him in the head. Allow for wind and current and aim upstream of the victim. 

Once he has the object, instruct him on how to paddle to safety. Unless it presents more danger, he should swim with the current.

Tossing a rope is also a throw rescue. Throw one end of the rope to him and then help to pull him to safety. Stay back at least 1 meter from the water’s edge to prevent you from falling or getting pulled in. 

1 Land Based Water Rescue Techniques, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Reach Rescue

Find something you can reach out to the victim with from dry land, e.g., a stick. Lie down at the edge of the water while reaching out. If possible, also hold on to something. 

Lying down and holding onto something prevents the victim from pulling you in.
 
2 Land Based Water Rescue Techniques, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Water-Based Water Rescue Techniques

In this section you will learn 4 basic water rescue methods for when land based rescues are not possible.

Only use water-based rescues if land-based rescues are not possible. Like land-based rescues, water-based rescues have a preferred order of use. Here they are in that order.

Wading Rescue

The wading rescue is good in shallow water up to waist deep. Any more than that and it turns into a towing rescue. Also, the victim must be conscious.

Find a rescue aid and enter the water as close to the victim as you can while still keeping safe and out of his arms reach. If possible, keep hold of something on shore.

Instruct the victim to grab onto the aid and pull him to safety.
 
1 Water-Based Water Rescue Techniques, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Boat Rescue

When there is a boat nearby and you know how to use it, you can use the boat rescue. As a general rule, avoid bringing the victim on board the boat.

For an unconscious victim, it is best to have a second rescuer hold his head above water as you drag him to safety. A solo rescuer will have to bring him on board. Be careful not to capsize the boat as you do so. 

Throw a tow rope/float to the conscious victim. If he is calm, he could even hold on to the boat although this is risky with a panicking victim.

2 Water-Based Water Rescue Techniques, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

There are many situations where you will have to bring the victim on board. For example, if there is something dangerous in the water or when the distance to land is very far. Remember to be flexible.

Swimming with Water Rescue Aids

This is same as the wading rescue except you swim the rescue aid to the victim instead of wading. It is useful for conscious victims in deeper waters. 

Swimming while holding water rescue aids requires prior practice. Also, practice taking off your clothes while in the water. You can use them as an improvised rescue aid if you are already in the water when someone needs help.

Like the wading rescue, be sure to stay out of arms reach from the victim. Using the aid is much safer. Help drag him to safety and make sure you are stable before helping him onto land.

Swimming Rescue Methods – Tow Rescue

Towing is when you have to grab the victim and bring him to safety. This may be for an unconscious victim, because you have no aid, or because the person is too panicked to grab your aid. The latter is the most dangerous as they may drag you under the water. 

There are several types of rescue tows and the one you use will depend on the specific scenario.

Whenever you approach any victim for a tow, stop a few meters back from him first. Re-access the situation and calm the patient from a safe distance. Assuming he is conscious, tell him what you plan to do and that he should stay calm throughout the process. Continue to reassure him until he is safe on shore.

Armpit Tow

The armpit tow is useful with a cooperative or unconscious victim. 

It allows you to approach from behind which is the safest position for you.

There are 2 types of armpit tows, i.e., the single and double. The one you use depends on what you prefer and the situation at hand. 

To do an armpit tow you must first level the victim off. This is so you can keep his face out of the water and his airway clear. It also makes the victim horizontal to the water, making it easier for you to take him to safety.

Single Armpit Tow

Approach the victim from behind and grab his armpit with your same side hand (e.g., right armpit with right hand).

Place your elbow of your other arm in the center of his back. Pull with your hand as you push with your elbow. At the same time use a scissor kick to level him out, face up. Your other hand can assist in the process if needed.

3 Water-Based Water Rescue Techniques, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

While keeping hold of his armpit, swim so you will drag him in the direction you want to go. Sidestroke works well. Allow your arm to extend until you start to pull him.

4 Water-Based Water Rescue Techniques, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Double Armpit Tow

When the victim is larger than you the double-armpit tow may be easier to use, especially to level him off. 
Approach the victim from behind and grab both his armpits. Grab his right armpit with your right hand and his left armpit with your left hand.

Place both your elbows on his back and pull with your hands as you push with your elbows. As you do this, use an inverted breaststroke (like in survival backstroke) to help pull him flat on his back. He is now leveled.
 
Continue to kick until your arms lock straight and you pull him. You will need to use a continuous and strong kick to keep your victim’s face out of the water. 

5 Water-Based Water Rescue Techniques, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Using the double-armpit tow long distance is hard since you have no arms to assist with swimming. A good idea is to start with the double-armpit tow and then switch to the single armpit tow once you have momentum.

You can make the double-armpit tow easier with a flotation aid. Place any long, thin, buoyant object between you and your victim and then tow him as normal. A pool noodle or rolled up sleeping mat work well. If possible, swim up with it in place, e.g., across your chest and under your armpits. 

When using an aid in this manner you may find it more difficult to level the victim. You will need to experiment to see what works best for you. You may even skip the leveling.

6 Water-Based Water Rescue Techniques, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Once you have momentum, you can free up one of your hands to help you swim. 

Every flotation device will act a little different. Experiment with things you are likely to have. 

Cross Chest Carry

Use the cross chest carry when rescuing a victim through heavy surf. It is a good passive victim rear rescue but is more tiring than other rescues.

Approach the victim from behind and level him off (described in armpit tows). Encircle his chest with one arm. You can use your other hand on his side to help position him into a secure position. 

Once you get a good grip, use sidestroke to swim him to safety. Your hip on his back helps to support him.

If the victim struggles, you can either tighten your grip or use a defense technique. 

7 Water-Based Water Rescue Techniques, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Vice Grip Rollover and Tow

When you suspect your victim has a spinal injury, use the vice grip rollover and tow. 

The vice grip rollover and tow allows you to turn a faced down victim over and tow him while protecting his spine. You can also provide rescue breaths to an unconscious victim while towing him. You may wish to do this if the distance to shore is further than you want to wait to perform CPR.

To do the vice grip rollover you need to be in water deep enough to allow you to submerge the victim. Grip his jaw with one hand and align your fore-arm along his sternum.

8 Water-Based Water Rescue Techniques, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Place your other hand on the back of the victim’s head and align your forearm along his spine. Squeeze your elbows together. Create a “vice” on his head, neck, and spine between your forearms.

9 Water-Based Water Rescue Techniques, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Move forward to level him off. While keeping him level and stable, roll under him to turn him over.

10 Water-Based Water Rescue Techniques, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Keep this vice grip and use a scissor kick to swim.

11 Water-Based Water Rescue Techniques, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Giving rescue breaths is challenging but you can do it if the victim is not too big for you. Change your hand on his chin to a pistol grip and lean over to give the breaths.

Note: Giving rescue breaths will compromise the spinal support.

How to Defend Yourself Against a Drowning Victim

A drowning victim can be dangerous to anyone that gets within arms reach of him. He can grab and pull you down with extreme strength (due to increased adrenalin) to save himself. 

This is why you only use a tow rescue as a last resort.

Practice these techniques on land first and then in the water. You want to do them instinctively.

Hold escape techniques in the water are different to on land. They consider the water and are non-violent. 

They are non-violent because the victim does not intend to harm you. His instinct for survival over-rides his ability to see the negative effects. Defend yourself and then help the victim if possible.

General Defense

Whenever a casualty tries to grab you, or as soon as you escape his grip, treat him as an obstruction. 

Adopt the defensive position by lying on your back with your feet pointed towards him. Kick your legs to make a big splash. Be careful not to kick the victim.

Kicking your legs does a few things:

  • Creates distance.
  • Communicates to the victim to not grab you.
  • Breaks the victim’s grip if he grabs your legs.

When grabbed there are universal things you can do to escape without harming the victim. 

  • Press your chin to your chest, raise your shoulders, and cross your arms over your face. This prevents the victim grabbing you around your neck.
  • Pull a finger or toe of the victim to loosen his grip.
  • Poke his armpit.
  • Take a big breath and submerge. All releases are more effective when done underwater. Your victim will want to stay above water so if you go under he is likely to let you go. He will at least loosen his grip which makes your escape easier.

The following techniques show how to escape the most common drowning victim holds. You can adapt these to other situations. 

Block

The block is a good preventative technique to use when the victim lunges at you as you approach him from the front. 

As he lunges raise your open palm against his upper chest. 

1 How to Defend Yourself Against a Drowning Victim, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Lean back and submerge, keeping your arm(s) extended as you do so. Swim away while you are underwater and the re-surface at a safe distance from the victim.

Wrist/Arm Grab Escape

When grabbed by your arm or wrist, reach across with your free hand and push down on your victim’s shoulder. Kick upward at the same time. 

While keeping downward pressure on his shoulder jerk up hard with your trapped arm. Repeat this until you are free.

Release the victim and swim back to a safe distance. 

Head Hold Escape

Use this technique when the victim grabs you around your head and neck from either the front or back.

2 How to Defend Yourself Against a Drowning Victim, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Protect your throat by taking a quick breath and tucking your chin into your shoulder. Clap your hands above your head a few times so you submerge underwater. This will also drag the victim underwater which often encourages him to let you go.

3 How to Defend Yourself Against a Drowning Victim, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Apply an upward grab and thrust with your thumbs on his brachial pressure points. Find these on the inside of his upper arm, a little above his elbow. 

4 How to Defend Yourself Against a Drowning Victim, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Swim away while you are underwater and the re-surface at a safe distance from the victim.

Swift Water Rescue Procedures

These rescues assume you only have one rope (such as a throw bag) and no other specialist equipment. Using this minimalist approach leaves you with the simplest of rope rescue techniques.

If you enjoy whitewater sports you should carry more equipment. Take a professional course on how to use it.

With all rope rescues, if you have the manpower, place safety rescuers. Put one upstream of the rescue to warn and redirect or stop anyone coming down the river. Also place one or more safety rescuers downstream of the rescue. This is in case a rescuer becomes a victim (e.g., if he falls in the water). Also, if the first rescue fails, there will be an immediate backup.

Note: Safety rescuers are not in most of the following demonstration pictures. Place them if you have the man-power.

Land Rope Rescues

Entering water is always more dangerous than performing a land-based rescue. With swift water the danger of a water-based rescue increases. Use a land-based rope rescue if possible.

Pendulum Rescue

The general idea of a pendulum rescue is to throw a rope to the victim so he can grab onto it as he drifts by. He then “swings” in an arc (like a pendulum) to shore. 

The pendulum rescue is fast to deploy but two things can go wrong.

  • The victim may miss the rope.
  • If the rescuer is not anchored he may get pulled into the water.

To do the pendulum rescue you must position yourself downstream of the victim. Be sure to give yourself enough time to deploy the rope. Anchor yourself if needed, depending on the weight of the victim and the force of the current. If possible, hold on to a tree or have a second rescuer hold on to you.

You should also consider what obstacles the victim may swing into due to your placement. 

Throw the rope a little in front of and past the victim so he can grab it as he floats past in the defensive position.

Instruct the victim to grab hold of the line and place it over his shoulder. This will orientate his head towards the rescuer. He must stay on his back. Keep stationary and allow the current to swing the victim towards the shore. Once the pendulum effect has finished, pull the victim the rest of the way.

1 Swift Water Rescues Using Rope, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

To counter-act the victim’s weight, use a belay position by passing the rope around the upper bit of your butt. For extra stability, you can sit on it, and if you have a water rescue team, have someone help to hold you down.

2 Swift Water Rescues Using Rope, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

If possible (and not dangerous), after you have thrown the rope, take a few steps back inland. This will increase the pendulum effect and reduce the load you need to bear. Let out some rope as you get repositioned. Once you are stable, pull the rope tight to start the pendulum.
 
3 Swift Water Rescues Using Rope, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Stabilization Line

A stabilization line is where you fix a rope across the river to catch the victim. It takes more time to set up but lessens the chances of missing the catch.

It is also useful for providing a general support line which the victim can use to hold his head above water. This can be a lifesaver in cases such as a foot entrapment when the current is forcing the victim down.

The stabilization line requires at least two people. One on either side of the river. You could do it with one person by tying one or both ends to something, but you would have to cross the river. 

The smaller the angle between the rescuer(s) and the victim the easier it will on the rescuers. 

Once the victim catches the line, he can traverse himself to safety.

4 Swift Water Rescues Using Rope, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Kiwi Cinch

The Kiwi Cinch is the only simple land-based rescue you can use with an unconscious victim. It requires the victim to be drifting close to shore.

Do it by looping the rope around the victim and then pulling him in.

Like the stabilization line, it is possible to do the Kiwi Cinch with one person, but it is much easier with two. This demonstration uses two people.

Each rescuer coils one half of the rope from the center out. This way they will have the same length of rope. 
As the victim drifts past, the rescuers throw the rope around him in a big loop. The two rescuers must communicate well so they throw their ends of the rope at the same time. They must hold on to the other end of the rope.

5 Swift Water Rescues Using Rope, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Cross the rope to create a closed loop around the victim. To do this, the two rescuers must swap places. The upstream rescuer walks behind the downstream rescuer. His rope will cross on top. The downstream rescuer moves up at the same time. 

6 Swift Water Rescues Using Rope, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Once in place, tighten the loop (the cinch) around the victim’s torso. The new upstream rescuer anchors himself in a sitting belay. The downstream rescuer pulls his side of the rope to swing the victim to shore.

7 Swift Water Rescues Using Rope, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Swimming Rope Rescues

Swimming rope rescues need the rescuer to enter the water to save the victim. This includes wading. Use them for unconscious victims, floating equipment, or anything that can’t self-rescue. 

Simple Rope Tether

With the simple rope tether, attach the rescuer to a rope as he wades out to rescue the victim. Secure the other end of the rope on shore by tying it to something or having a second rescuer as a belayer. 

8 Swift Water Rescues Using Rope, Basic Water Rescue Training Online, Survival Fitness Plan

Tethered Swimmer

The tethered swimmer rescue is when the rescuer swims up to the victim instead of wading. The rescuer will need two hands, so tie him to the tether. 

Although a tied belay would work, it is best if the belayer is human. This way he can feed out the line as needed and help pull the rescuer and victim to shore. The belayer should feed the rope loose so the swimmer restricted by it.
 
When the victim is wearing something on his upper body (such as a life jacket) the rescuer can grab onto it. If not, use an armpit tow. 

When there is a human rescuer on shore he can pendulum/pull the rescuer and victim to shore. If not, then they can drift downstream until the line gets taught. They will then swing towards shore. 

All water rescue is risky, but river rescue training is more-so. This is a subject you need professional training in to keep safe. 

Besides swift water rescue and recovery techniques, a professional course can teach you swift water rescue terminology, water rescue knots, swift water rescue hand signals, and more.

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Water Rescue Awareness Online Conclusion

Now you know different types of water rescues which you can use as water rescue drill ideas, as open water rescue emergency response, for inland water rescue, and more.  

They also make good water safety and rescue training exercises for flood rescue training or whatever. 
Water rescue is dangerous. Follow these water safety basic rescue procedures to give yourself the best chance of success.

Did you enjoy this article about basic water rescue training? If so, please share it with your friends.

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Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/basic-stick-fighting-techniques/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/basic-stick-fighting-techniques/#respond Wed, 03 Oct 2018 14:06:10 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=14009 Here are some basic stick fighting techniques for self defense. It covers stance, stepping, strikes, and defense. There are many stick fighting styles from around the world. This stick fighting training is a mixture of Filipino stick fighting forms.  I use the terms Kali, Escrima, and Filipino stick fighting interchangeably in this article. They all […]

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Here are some basic stick fighting techniques for self defense. It covers stance, stepping, strikes, and defense.

There are many stick fighting styles from around the world. This stick fighting training is a mixture of Filipino stick fighting forms. 

I use the terms Kali, Escrima, and Filipino stick fighting interchangeably in this article. They all mean the same thing – fighting with a stick.

Contents

  • Stick Fighting Basics – Stance
  • Stick Fighting Tutorial – Stepping
  • Stick Fighting Lessons – Strikes
    • Stick Fighting Moves – King Strike
    • Stick Fighting Drills – Cutting Strikes
  • Stick Fighting Exercises – Stick Fight Blocking
    • Stick Fighting Filipino King Block
    • Stick Fighting Routine – Parry Drill
    • Stick Fighting Instruction – Returning to 7 Drill
  • Stick Fighting Locks and Disarms
    • Twist Snatches
    • Lever Snatches
    • But Strike Snatches

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Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Stick Fighting for Beginners – Stick Fighting Stance

When Escrima fighting with a stick the first thing to learn is correct stance. 

When stationary stand with your feet a bit wider than shoulder width apart.

Hold the stick in your strongest hand and have your strong side as your lead. The bottom of your weapon extends between 1 and 2 inches below your little finger.

Unless striking or blocking, hold your stick over your shoulder. Your hand is near your ear on the same side and the tip of your weapon points to your rear. Doing this will:

  • Keep your hand out of range from your opponent’s strike. If he hits your hand you might drop your weapon.
  • Give your strikes the greatest power and speed for attacking your primary target, i.e., your opponent’s head.

Your rear hand is a back-up for defense or secondary attack. Keep it close to your centerline most of the time.

1 Stick-Fighting Stance and Stepping, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Stick Fighting Eskrima Stepping

Now you have a good kali stick fighting stance, you can learn to move. 

Use “spring semi-forward stepping” to close distance.

Your back heel is up. This turns your calf muscle into a double spring. One behind your knee and one at your heel. When you release these springs, it projects your whole body forward.

Step a small step forward with your lead foot and use your rear foot to take up the original position of your lead.

2 Stick-Fighting Stance and Stepping, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Your stance never exaggerates too long or short.

Keep most of your weight on your rear leg. The heel of your front foot lands first and then the toes from both feet land at the same time. This keeps you grounded and ready for the next move.

Stick Fighting Elementary Strikes

When practicing self taught stick fighting you want to stick to the basics. Here are the single stick elementary strikes.

The King Strike

The best strike in stick fighting by far is the “king strike”.  Filipino stick fighting drills this is the number 7 strike.

The number 7 strike comes straight down between your eyes. With it, you own the center-line, and who-ever owns the center-line has the advantage.

When striking, target your opponent’s face or the top of his head. In a defensive capability, it protects you from any angulated strike.

To do the number 7 strike, start in the basic stance. Bring your stick straight down the center into your target.

As the stick comes down your other hand comes up. This helps keep you balanced/symmetrical and is also a backup defense.

1 The Best Strike In Stick Fighting, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Stick-Fighting Training

Practice this from a stationary position, with forward stepping, and as double hits.

You can make combinations along the number 7-axis. Here is one example:

  • Double hit, straight thrust, and step through with an uppercut using the bottom of the stick.

2 The Best Strike In Stick Fighting, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Stick-Fighting Training

Escrima Stick Fighting Drills – Cutting Strikes Drill

In this single stick training drill you will practice cutting strikes.

Cutting strikes are those that you follow through on. Like a slash with a sword. 

This is as opposed to stopping or bouncing off when you make contact. 

When practicing these kali stick fighting strikes, stand a little wider than shoulder width. Lead with your strong side and have your body at 45° to your target. Point your feet toward your enemy.

Practice using circular forces. Roll your strikes using your waist. The power comes from body motion, not your arm.

Using your arm and wrist lacks power. It is good for the sport to get fast points but not very effective on the street. Big hits end fights.

These martial arts stick fighting techniques are short range. Do not extend your arm too much. You may get more distance but it loses power at your shoulder. It will also make it easier for your opponent to manipulate/grab your stick and/or arm.

Aim to hit your target with the top couple of inches of your stick. The strikes go through your opponent in a cutting motion.

Backhand to the Head

Start with the stick on your left side to the top of your left shoulder. Strike diagonal and down across your body to your bottom right.

1 Stick Fighting Cutting Strikes, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

Forehand to Knee

Bring the stick up to shoulder height and squat down to lower your body. Strike down at your opponent’s knee.

2 Stick Fighting Cutting Strikes, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

Backhand to Knee

Raise the stick up to your left shoulder. Stay low.

3 Stick Fighting Cutting Strikes, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

Do a backhand strike to your opponent’s knee.

4 Stick Fighting Cutting Strikes, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

Stick Fighting for Self Defense – Blocks

Learning defensive Escrima stick fighting techniques is important. 

The following are practical and easy to do.

King Block

If your opponent uses an angled attack, your number 7 will win.

When you both use king strikes then whoever is first to the target has the advantage. If you are not the first, you must turn your attack to defense.

Note: If both fighters use king strikes at the same time then the tips of the stick will clash. In reality, this is unlikely because doing a perfect king strike is rare. In most cases, it will angle a little to one side.

To make the king strike defensive place your rear hand behind your stick as you do the strike.

If needed you can turn a little toward the angle your opponent’s strike is coming on. Do not turn over 10°.

Creating triangles makes the defense structure strong.

3 The Best Strike In Stick Fighting, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense Stick-Fighting Training

Stick-Fighting Parry

Use the stick fighting parry when both you and your opponent strike but his timing is ahead of yours. You deflect your opponent’s attack (parry) and then counter with a strike or snatch.

If your opponent attacks with a number 7 strike you need to get off center to parry it.

To parry on your right side, take an angulated step forward and raise your hand a little. Your bent arm and stick form a triangle. This triangle will cause your opponent’s attack to glide off.

Do not angle your arm out. It will weaken the structure.

Stick Fighting Parry - Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Once you have deflected the attack, counter-attack (left picture below).

You can use your other hand to help guide his stick out of the way (right picture below), or if you are ahead of his timing, your sticks may not even come into contact.

Stick Fighting Parry - Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

You can go into a snatch. Here is one example.

Stick Fighting Parry - Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

When you need to deflect on your left side point your stick over your left shoulder. The triangle is still there.

Stick Fighting Parry - Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

How to Stick Fight: How to Disarm Your Opponent

In this section you you will learn how to take your opponent’s stick using snatches. 

These Eskrima techniques are not stick fighting locks, but you can adapt them to be. 

When you learn stick fighting against another stick, 90% of the time using the king strike will beat your average opponent. 

When your opponent knows what he is doing, using a snatch is your next best option. This is because most stick fighting martial arts do not grab the stick. So if you learn single stick grabbing techniques you will have a major advantage.

In these Eskrima techniques there are 3 base snatches:

  • Twist
  • Lever
  • But strike

Once you know these 3 base snatches, you can make endless variations. How you do them will depend on circumstance, the angle of incoming strike, etc. 

All snatches begin with the 7 defense. Once you have blocked your opponent’s attack use your free hand to take control of his weapon.

In the following demonstrations, all the attacks are forward or backhand downward strikes. 

With slight adjustments, you can apply these snatches to different angles of strikes. 

Even if your opponent uses a perfect king strike, you can turn it into an angled strike. All you need to do is lean to one side as you block it.

Unless otherwise stated, in all these demonstrations “you” are the person on the right.

Twist Snatches

Stick on Stick

Your opponent attacks with a forward downward strike. Block the strike.

1 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Grab the top of your opponent’s stick with your left hand. Use an overhand grip (palm facing down).

Pull your opponent’s stick down towards the outside of his guard so it is horizontal.

Your 2 sticks form a cross. Your stick is close to your opponent’s hand.

2 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Push your opponent’s stick into his face using a vortex motion. Pry it out of his hand by pushing it past the outside of his shoulder using a waterfall action.

3 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Finish with a butt strike (the bottom of your stick) to your opponent’s face.

4 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Fist on Fist

Your opponent attacks with a forward downward strike. Block the strike.

5 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Grab the top of your opponent’s stick with your left hand. Use an overhand grip.

6 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

As you pull your opponents stick down into the cross place your right fist onto the back of his right fist.

Push your opponent’s stick into his face and then pry it out of his hand by pushing it past the outside of his shoulder.

7 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Finish with a strike to your opponent’s face.

8 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Lever Snatches

Hit and Twist
Your opponent attacks with a backhand downward strike. Block the strike.

9 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Grab your opponent’s stick and push the top into his face.

10 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Twist your opponent’s stick anti-clockwise to your left using your stick as a fulcrum.

As you do this, you need to let the stick “spin” in your right hand so you finish with an overhand grip. Once your opponent’s stick is towards your left side tighten your grip.

Keep twisting until the stick comes out of your opponent’s grip. Aim the bottom of the stick towards his groin. Not only will this hit him, it also makes it easier to get the stick out of his grip.

11 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Arm Lever

Your opponent attacks with a backhand downward strike. Block the strike.

12 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Grab your opponent’s stick and then lower it down so you can thrust the tip of your stick into him.

13 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Do a second thrust past your opponent’s head. This may also be unintentional if you missed the first thrust. Next, use your arm as the fulcrum point to disarm your opponent in the same way as snatch 8.

14 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

You could also punch your opponent as opposed to the thrust.

15 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

But Strike Snatches

But Strike

Your opponent attacks with a backhand downward strike. Block the strike.

16 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Grab your opponent’s right wrist using an underhand grip.

17 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

Use your forearm in a downward strike to knock your opponent’s stick out of his hand.

18 How to Take Your Opponent's Stick, Basic Stick Fighting Techniques for Self Defense

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Basic Kali Martial Arts Techniques Conclusion

Stick fighting is a big subject with many techniques and strategic lessons. This article only covers the stick fighting basics you need for self defense.

If you want to learn more, Sam Fury’s Vortex Control Self Defense is a good start. 

You may also want to take stick fighting classes. And if you want to learn from the grand-masters, you can try stick fighting in the Philippines!

Did you enjoy this article about how to fight with a bamboo stick? If so, please share it with your friends.

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The Ultimate Parkour Tutorial for Beginners https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/parkour-tutorial-beginners/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/parkour-tutorial-beginners/#respond Mon, 01 Oct 2018 03:40:55 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=10772 This parkour tutorial for beginners aims to teach you the parkour fundamentals.  It includes a basic parkour moves list with pictures, top parkour tips, and some parkour facts. Contents What is Parkour? Where to Practice Parkour Parkour Exercises for Conditioning How to Catwalk for Parkour Movement and Conditioning How to do Side Sapiens How to […]

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This parkour tutorial for beginners aims to teach you the parkour fundamentals. 

It includes a basic parkour moves list with pictures, top parkour tips, and some parkour facts.

Contents

  • What is Parkour?
  • Where to Practice Parkour
  • Parkour Exercises for Conditioning
    • How to Catwalk for Parkour Movement and Conditioning
    • How to do Side Sapiens
    • How to do Parkour Ground Kongs
  • Parkour Roll Landing
    • Forward Parkour Roll
    • Side Parkour Roll
    • Back Parkour Roll
    • Parkour Dive Roll
  • Parkour Jumping Techniques
    • Parkour Precision Jumping
    • Running Precision Jumps
    • How to do Parkour Striding
  • Parkour Vaults for Beginners
    • How to do the Parkour Safety Vault
    • How to do the Parkour Lazy Vault
    • How to Parkour Kong Vault
  • How to Parkour Wall Run
    • How to Wall Run Vertically
    • How to do the Parkour Wall Climb
    • How to Tic Tac and Horizontal Wall Run
  • Conclusion

A Beginner Parkour Training Manual Like No Other
Get Your Copy of Essential Parkour Training Today

Parkour Tutorial for Beginners

What is Parkour?

A standard parkour definition is:

“An activity where you move from one point to another as fast as possible.”

While doing this you can use parkour techniques to negotiate obstacles including running, jumping, climbing, and more.

Where to Practice Parkour

You can learn how to practice parkour at home, in the park, in a parkour training gym, etc.

In fact, you can go parkouring anywhere there are structures to practice your parkour skills on. Oh, and as long as the authorities allow it.

Parkour Exercises for Conditioning

Before you can learn parkour tricks for beginners at home you need to develop your parkour muscles. 

Conditioning will get you closer to the ideal parkour body type.

The Survival Fitness Plan conditioning exercises are a good start. Do super burpees and pull-ups every day. Pull ups are also one of the best upper body parkour workout exercises. Learn about those exercises here.

Yoga also compliments parkour well. The Survival Fitness Plan yoga stretch is a good parkour yoga routine as it works the whole body. You can find it here.

The best workout routine for parkour depends on what you need to develop in. The hardest parkour moves to do are those which you don’t have the strength. Focus on developing those muscles.

Here are some additional basic parkour core workouts that only use bodyweight so you can do your parkour conditioning at home.

How to Catwalk for Parkour Movement and Conditioning

Catwalking is a form of quadrupedal movement. Quadrupedal movement is the act of moving on all-fours. 

Other types of quadrupedal movement include side sapiens and ground kongs. They all have their practical use and also make great conditioning exercises.

The catwalk is useful when having to traverse across thin surfaces such as ledges and rails. They are also useful to get through or under small areas. It gives you more balance and control on the obstacle and also lowers your profile. This makes it great for escape and evasion.

Start by getting down on your hands (flat palms) and feet. Put your right hand in front of your left hand, and your left foot in front of your right foot. 

Your hands and feet form a line and as you move forward, you want to maintain this line as close as possible. 

When first starting it will help to follow an actual line on the ground. When you are on a ledge or rail you will have little choice.

1 How to Catwalk for Parkour Movement and Conditioning, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

To move forward first move your rear hand to the front, then your rear foot to the front. Repeat this. Start with small steps. Transfer your weight between your arm and legs — front and back, left and right. 

2 How to Catwalk for Parkour Movement and Conditioning, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

For stability, keep three points of contact on the surface at all times.

Once you have gained the coordination of movement concentrate on perfecting your posture. Make yourself as level as possible from your hips to your head. 

Keep your back horizontal to the ground and your head forward. 

Don’t stretch yourself out, bring your knees too close to your body, or stick your bum out.

When you need a rest, crouch. Do not put your knees on the ground. 

Progress further and work different muscles by cat-walking in different ways. Backward, up and down stairs, getting low, on ledges, on rails, etc.

3 How to Catwalk for Parkour Movement and Conditioning, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

How to do Side Sapiens

Side Sapiens (a.k.a. side monkeys) are good to displace momentum when landing from a drop or to continue flow into your next movement. They are also a good progression step when learning the reverse vault.

Start in a low squat position.

Reach your arms out across your body to your left and plant them firm on the ground. Your right-hand lands first closely followed by your left.

1 How to do Side Sapiens, Survival Fitness Plan Essential Parkour Training

Keep your arms strong and use them to support your body weight as you bring your legs to your left. Your right foot lands first closely followed by your left so you are back in the low squat position.

Engage your core and land with control. Land light with your feet and as quiet as you can.

Repeat this movement a few times and then go back the other way.

2 How to do Side Sapiens, Survival Fitness Plan Essential Parkour Training

This is also good to practice on ledges and rails.

For more of a challenge, you can do this exercise with straight legs. 

3 How to do Side Sapiens, Survival Fitness Plan Essential Parkour Training

How to do Parkour Ground Kongs

Ground Kongs are another type of quadrupedal movement. They are a progression to the kong vault but are also practical in their own right. Use the ground kong to displace momentum from a drop and/or to continue flow into your next movement.

Start in a low squat position.

Reach forward and plant both your hands on the ground.

1 How to do Parkour Ground-Kongs, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

Keep your arms strong and use them to support your body weight as you bring your legs up to your hands (or as close as you can). 

Engage your core and land with control. Light and quiet is the key. 

Repeat this movement a few times.

2 How to do Parkour Ground-Kongs, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

When you are confident practice on ledges and rails.

As you build strength, you can try to cover more ground.
 
3 How to do Parkour Ground-Kongs, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

You can also do ground kongs backward which will target a different set of muscles. 

Parkour Roll Landing

The parkour safety roll is one of the best parkour moves to learn for safety.  It is also useful in self defense. 

Use the safety roll to prevent injury from a technique gone wrong, a big drop, a general fall, or if someone pushes you. It is also a good technique for transitioning between movements. 

Your aim should be to make your safety roll instinctive. This is because the times you will need it most are those when you are not ready.

How high can a parkour roll save you?

Landing with a well-executed parkour roll will allow you to jump from higher than without, but how high depends on your training. 

As a beginner, start small and work your way up. If you start with something half your height, you can work your way up to 2x your height within a few months.

This tutorial will teach you how to do a parkour roll without hurting yourself.

You can do the parkour safety roll forwards, sideways, or backward. You will use the forward roll most often but practice them all.

When first learning how to do a safety roll, do so on soft ground such as on grass, mats, or sand. Take it slow and start low. Once you have the technique you can progress by increasing height and/or momentum. 

When you are confident, you can learn how to do a parkour roll on concrete. If you are get parkour roll shoulder pain, take a rest from the concrete for a few days.

Forward Parkour Roll

Choose which side you are most comfortable rolling over, right or left. You want to learn to roll on both sides, but for now, start on one.

If rolling over your right shoulder, kneel with your right foot forward. 

Place your hands on the ground in front of you so that your thumbs and index fingers form a kind of diamond shape. Put them at a 45º angle in the direction you want to roll in.

Note: You can roll straight over your shoulder if you have something in your hands. When you have your hands available, it is preferable to use them to help control your motion. They also absorb some impact.

1 How to Safety Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

Look over your left shoulder and use your rear leg to push you over into the roll. Use your hands to control your momentum and your arms to lift you a little. You want to land on the back of your shoulder blade. Try not to hit the top of your shoulder.

Roll across your back to your opposite hip. If you roll wrong (which is common when first learning) you will feel it. It is a learning curve.

2 How to Safety Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

Come up from your roll between your tail and hip bones. Use the side of your leg and your momentum to get back on your feet.

3 How to Safety Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

You could also come straight up to your feet as opposed to using your thigh. This saves your knee contacting the ground but puts more pressure on your ankle as you stand.

4 How to Safety Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

As you get more confident start from taller positions such as squatting and standing. 

A good exercise is to stand straight and let your body fall forward like a plank.

5 How to Safety Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

At the last moment roll out. You can do this with side and back rolls also. 

6 How to Safety Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

Also, progress to rolling with momentum and with jumps. 

When jumping into the roll keep your legs flexed as you land and allow the momentum to push you into the roll.

7 How to Safety Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

Once you are confident, you can jump and roll from ledges. Work your way up to this with both confidence and strength. You need to increase the strength in your legs to do bigger and bigger drops. 

As you increase height and speed, it will help to land with your feet closer together. Also, be more adaptable with your arms. 

Note: Dropping into a roll is not the same as a dive roll. When dropping from height your feet still make contact first.

Side Parkour Roll

Side rolls are good for preventing injury when falling in a weird direction. 

This parkour technique is like a forward roll except that you will roll at a more horizontal angle across your back. The exact rolling path also depends on the angle you are falling at. 

As you fall use your hands to help control your movement. Ensure you clear your arm/shoulder and land somewhere on your back. 

8 How to Safety Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

Use the momentum to create as smooth a roll as possible and then come back onto your feet. 

9 How to Safety Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

Back Parkour Roll

When first learning backward safety rolls it helps to do the forward roll first. Do the forward roll and stop before getting to your feet, then roll back using the same line as you rolled forward on. 

Roll forward and back a few times to get the feeling. 

When ready you can back roll and come up to stand. At the end of your back roll continue to go over your shoulder. 

10 How to Safety Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

Use your hands to push yourself up a little so you can get on your feet. 

11 How to Safety Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan11 How to Safety Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

When back rolling from a drop always try to absorb the impact with your legs as much as possible.
 
Landing with one foot in behind the other will make going into the roll much easier. 

12 How to Safety Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

Lower yourself down as much as possible and then go into the roll.

13 How to Safety Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

Get back on your feet as before.
 
14 How to Safety Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

It is important to practice rolling until it is an instinctive reaction and then to continue to practice them with all variations (jumping, momentum, both sides of the body, landing at different angles, etc.). 

Parkour Dive Roll

I consider dive rolls an advanced parkour technique but they are a good skill to know for safety.

Use the dive roll in parkour or self-defense to prevent injury when coming down on your head. In most cases, dive rolls are intentional. Such as when diving over an obstacle. You can also use it in accidental falls where you are low to the ground and don’t have the room to land feet first.

Note: If possible, landing feet first and doing a safety roll is your best option.

Ensure you are proficient at the safety roll before continuing with this dive roll tutorial.

Avoid doing the parkour dive roll on hard ground, even when proficient.

The technique for doing the dive roll is like the forward roll but there is a lot more impact and momentum. Also, you are coming doing toward your head as opposed to landing on your feet first. 

Start by practicing the forward roll from a handstand. You don’t need to be great at handstands, you only have to get at the right angle for a moment so you can go into the roll.

Lower yourself with your arms then lean forward a little to tuck your head as you go into the roll. 

How to Dive Roll - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan1

Keep your body strong (arms, core, legs, and neck) as you allow your body to “collapse” into the roll.

How to Dive Roll - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan2

Once you are comfortable, you can jump into the dive roll from a standing position.

Kick your leg back as you jump to help get your hips over. 

As you hit the ground absorb some impact with your arms. Do this by keeping them strong whilst allowing them to collapse. Also, use your arms to ensure you get over your head.

How to Dive Roll - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan3

Use the momentum to flow onto your back and into the roll.
 
How to Dive Roll - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan4

Next, try it with a short run-up, and then try jumping off with two feet.

Progress until you are doing a full dive roll. Dive and stretch out like a cat. 

5 How to Dive Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

Absorb the impact with your arms.
 
How to Dive Roll - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan6

Tuck your head as you go into the roll. 

7 How to Dive Roll, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

Train at this level until you have it instinctive. Progress by jumping higher and over things. 

When jumping over things ensure your hips clear the obstacle and your legs/feet follow the same path. 

Parkour Jumping Techniques

Parkour Precision Jumping

Precision jumping is a fundamental parkour skill in which you jump from one point to another. It allows you to land on small spaces like ledges and handrails. 

You want to land right on your intended landing spot. There is no extra movement such as stumbling forward or backward.

Begin with your feet together and bend your knees a little so you are in a semi-crouch position. 

Move your arms behind you as you shift your weight to the balls of your feet. 

Lean forward. The greater the distance you need to jump, the more you need to lean. 

As you jump throw your arms forwards and upwards. 

Your energy travels up the legs, through the torso, and into the hands. 

Aim to arc up and then come down on to the landing area, landing on the balls of your feet as quiet as you can. Land on both feet simultaneously.

How to do Parkour Precision Jumping - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan1

When ready, jump from farther back and with small level differences, such as onto a curb.
 
How to do Parkour Precision Jumping - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan2

You can also try high to low, to/from rails, etc.

How to do Parkour Precision Jumping - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan3

Note: When jumping onto handrails it is extra important that you aim to land on the balls of your feet. This way if you slip a little then you have the whole of your foot to recover. If you land on your heels and slip, you will fall.

Running Precision Jumps

When precision jumping over very large gaps you can use the running precision jump. The running precision jump is what it sounds like, i.e., a precision jump with a run-up. 

The running precision jump uses a one-foot take-off. You still land in the same way as a standing precision jump, i.e., a precise double foot landing.

Since you are jumping with much more momentum “sticking” the landing is more difficult. Many people find they jump too far and/or stumble forward when landing.

How to do Parkour Striding

Parkour striding (or bounding) is useful for running across elevated obstacles. It is like precision jumping but instead of a stationary landing, you leap from one foot to another.

Approach the stride like a running precision. Run up and take off from one foot.

How to do Parkour Striding - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan1

Instead of trying to land with 2 feet, elongate and stretch your legs out front and back.
 
How to do Parkour Striding - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan2

As your lead leg lands, you want your center of gravity to be over your foot so you can push off into the next stride. If you are too far forward or back it will mess up your momentum.

How to do Parkour Striding - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan3

It will help to get your arms and leg in sync. It is the same as walking, i.e., whichever foot is in front the opposite arm is also in front. 

You can use this arm swing to generate more power. The further the distance between your obstacles the more you should swing your arms.

How to do Parkour Striding - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan4

Parkour Vaults for Beginners

How to do the Parkour Safety Vault

You can use the safety vault to pass a low and short obstacle in front of you such as a waist-height wall. The safety vault is the first vault to learn. This is because it is the easiest to learn and the safest to do.

An easy way to learn the safety vault is by numbering your hands and feet. It will help you remember the order of placement.

  1. Left hand.
  2. Right leg.
  3. Left leg.
  4. Right hand.

Take it slow at the start. Get the pattern into your head, and then into your muscle memory.

Approach the obstacle and place your left hand (#1) on it. Next place your right leg (#2). Stretch it out far enough to allow your left leg (#3) to pass through between your left hand and right leg. 

How to do the Safety Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan1
 
Step straight through with your left leg. Keep your right arm (#4) up so you can pass your leg through easier. 

How to do the Safety Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan2

Here is what it looks like from the front.

How to do the Safety Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan3

Practice on both sides of your body. 

When you add speed your #1 leg doesn’t have to push off that much. It becomes a touch on top of the obstacle so you can gauge where it is. 

As you run up to the obstacle, be sure not to stop to prepare for the vault. Stride onto it and go up and over the object in an arc.

Land with your chest above or in front of your foot. Also, use your #1 and #2 to push the object behind you so you get more forward momentum. At the same time reach with your #3 leg down to the floor.
 
How to do the Safety Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan4

How to do the Parkour Lazy Vault

The lazy vault is useful when approaching a small to medium sized obstacle at an angle. You can approach at any speed. 

You can also use it when coming in and out at a similar angle and when you want to exit at a different angle.

Assuming you are approaching the obstacle from the right, your limbs will go over the wall in this order: 

  1. Right hand.
  2. Right leg.
  3. Left leg.
  4. Left hand.

This first progression step will help you get the mechanics of the technique.

Approach the wall on a diagonal from the right and place your right hand (#1) on the wall as you jump up. Your right leg (#2) goes through and you land on the wall with your left foot (#3).

How to Lazy Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan1

Drop to the ground landing on your right foot first (#2) and then continue to run.

How to Lazy Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan2

Here it is from behind. 

How to Lazy Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan3

Once you are ready, you can learn the actual lazy vault which means you will not place your left foot (#3) on the wall.

Kick your legs up, over the wall, and then bring your hips up. 

How to Lazy Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan4

As you go over your left hand (#4) replaces your right on the obstacle.

How to Lazy Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan5

Use your left hand to help push your hips away from the obstacle so you can continue running. 

A “proper” lazy vault means you approach on an angle and exit along the same path. Ensure your limbs go over in the right order and that you land/run out on #2.

How to Lazy Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan6

If you want to exit at a different angle, turn your hips in the direction you want to go while in the air. 

How to Lazy Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan7

If you are exiting at a different angle without meaning to, it may be because you are forgetting to put your #4 hand down.

How to Parkour Kong Vault

The kong vault is useful for vaulting longer or higher obstacles. It is more difficult than other vaults but is worth the practice. 

Other names for the kong vault include the cat pass, monkey vault, kong leap, and others.

Start on something like a picnic table, i.e., wide enough to land on but not too high, and small enough to vault over.

This first progression exercise is helpful to get over the fear of hitting your toes on the obstacle. 

Stand at one end of the obstacle and place your palms flat on it a little more than shoulder-width apart. Have your fingers facing forwards.

Use your arms to support you as you jump up onto the obstacle, landing with your feet between your hands. Move your hands away as needed. 
 
How to Kong Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan1

Repeat this exercise until you are comfortable with the mechanics.

When ready, try to land further forward by pushing the obstacle back underneath you. The more you push the further you can go.
 
How to Kong Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan2

Next, try starting with some distance between you and the obstacle.
  
How to Kong Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan3

Take a 1 or 2 step “run up” then do the same as before.
 
How to Kong Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan4

Let the momentum help you get further onto the obstacle. 

To get even further, you can run up with more momentum using one of 2 take-offs depending on the obstacle. 

First, try the 2-foot punch take off which most people find easier. It will redirect momentum up which makes it better for high obstacles. 

Start further away from the obstacle than you have been.
 
How to Kong Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan5

Run up and hop on one foot, then land on both feet together. You will need practice to learn where a good distance is for you to land back from the obstacle.
 
How to Kong Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan6

Use the momentum to go into a dive onto the obstacle then complete the vault as normal. 

7 How to Kong Vault, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

Next, try the split foot take off. The split foot takeoff has more forward momentum than the two-foot punch takeoff. This makes it better for longer obstacles.

Start at about the same distance as you did for the 2-foot punch take off.
 
How to Kong Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan8

Run up and hop on one foot and then land on the opposite one. Take another quick step and then push up with both feet to go into the dive.
 
How to Kong Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan9

Complete the vault as before.

How to Kong Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan10

Try to get further and further until you can clear the obstacle.

To get more distance increase your approach speed and use the split foot take off.
 
How to Kong Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan11

Kick out your feet to raise your hips which will help stretch out your dive.
 
How to Kong Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan12

Spot where you want your hands to land and then push up and forward as your arms make contact.

13 How to Kong Vault, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

Land on 2 feet to begin with and then progress into landing in a one-two motion so you can resume running.

How to Kong Vault - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan14

Once you are comfortable, try the kong vault on higher and/or longer obstacles. Be sure to use the right take-off, i.e., 2-foot punch for higher and split foot for longer. 

How to Parkour Wall Run

Here you will learn 2 types of wall runs.

The first is how to run up a wall. This will also include the parkour climb up.

The second is how to wall run sideways.

How to Wall Run Vertically

If you want to know how to climb a high wall, parkour has you covered.

To practice the vertical wall run you can use any obstacle that is tall enough. You don’t have to reach the top of the wall to practice. If you can reach the top of the wall, it means you can also practice your wall climb (or other techniques) at the same time.

To begin with, you need to get the right spacing with your steps when approaching the obstacle. After a while this becomes intuitive. 

Find a spot where you are comfortable with your leg resting on the obstacle at about hip height. Not too close where you’re pushing in and not too far away from where you are stretching to reach. 

Now you can get comfortable stepping a foot onto the obstacle and jumping off it. Don’t worry about gaining height yet. 

Use your strong leg against the obstacle first as that is the one that will have the most impact. Afterwards, you can practice on both sides.

How to Wall Run - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan1

As your foot hits the obstacle push into it in an upward motion. The aim is to get your center of gravity to go up. Do not apply too much downward pressure as it will cause you to slip. Run into the obstacle and “bounce” up off it.

How to Wall Run - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan2

Once you are comfortable add speed so you can get more height. Don’t go too fast too soon otherwise you might slam into the obstacle. 

Jump and plant your foot as high as you can then kick off. If you are too slow to kick off, you will lose power.
 
How to Wall Run - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan3

When there is a small obstacle you can try grabbing onto the edge. If not, aim to touch it as high as you can, keeping in mind that the higher you go the longer the drop back down.

How to Wall Run - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan4

After some practice, you will recognize how to react according to the obstacle such as approach speed, when to jump, and how high to plant your foot.

Throwing your arms up will give you more reach as will leading with one arm. 

Leaving your hand on the obstacle can be useful to give you a little extra push up. It can also prevent you from slamming into it.

How to Wall Run - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan5

How to do the Parkour Wall Climb

You can use the parkour wall climb up to pull yourself from a hanging position up onto a wall in a quick and efficient manner. 

When first learning it will help to use the momentum from a cat leap or wall run to help get up the wall. Your aim should be to do it from a static hang.

Start on a wall you can wall run up so you can get the most out of momentum.

As soon as you have a grip on the obstacle use your feet to push your hips back as you pull up and in with your arms. Push your feet into the obstacle, not down. Try to straighten your highest leg.

Your leg push and arm pull is one smooth motion. The aim is to get your chest above the top of the obstacle. 

As your chest comes over, you need to transition from your hands hanging to your hands on top. For most people, this is the hardest part of the climb-up.
 
How to do the Wall Climb-Up - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan1

Using the momentum from the push/pull, take the weight off your hands and ‘pop’ them on top of the obstacle. Your aim is to get your palms on top. 

The more you can push against the obstacle and the more momentum you have the easier it will be.

Once your hands are on top, push up. Keep your chest forward so you don’t fall back.

How to do the Wall Climb-Up - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan2

To make things a little easier you can transition one arm at a time. Progress to doing them together when you’re ready.

To stand on the obstacle use one of your feet to kick out a little so you can bring your other foot up on top. 

How to do the Wall Climb-Up - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan3

Avoid using your elbows and knees to help you.

How to do the Wall Climb-Up - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan4

Once you can do the parkour wall climb up from a wall run, try doing it from a static hang. Push your body against the obstacle a little to help pop your hips back. 

How to do the Wall Climb-Up - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan6

As your legs swing back in, place one foot on the wall and then get your other leg as high as possible. This will allow you to transition into the wall climb.

How to do the Wall Climb-Up - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan5

Correct technique is what will get you on top of an obstacle but having more strength will make it easier. Some useful exercises to help build strength are:

  • Dips. Do them with your hands in front of your chest as opposed to being out to your sides. This will mimic the climb-up.
  • Pull ups. Standard pull-ups. Not chin-ups.
  • Reverse climb-ups. Start from on top of the wall and lower yourself down by reversing the climb-up action. Do it slow.
  • SFP Super-burpees. The ultimate all-round conditioning exercise.
  • Traversing. Hang off an obstacle and climb around it.

How to Tic Tac and Horizontal Wall Run

Now you can use parkour for running up a wall. Next you will learn how to wall run horizontally.

A tic-tac is when you push your foot off an obstacle in an angled direction. It is a simple parkour technique which you can use for a few things. It can help you clear gaps, leap over obstacles, gain height, or for a quick redirection of your momentum.

A horizontal wall run is a progression of the tic-tac. It is when you take several steps along the wall as opposed to only one.

To begin with, get used to how the obstacle feels under your foot. Walk up to the obstacle and place your foot on it. Now push off in a slight upward manner so you arc back onto the ground. Whichever foot your push off with land on your opposite foot first and then continue to walk away.    

You can focus your tic-tac to push away or along the obstacle. Face your chest and shoulders towards the destination you want to go.

How to Tic Tac and Horizontal Wall Run - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan1

Next add momentum and try to get more distance and/or height. 

The more momentum you have the harder you can push off the wall and the higher and/or farther you will get. Also, the higher you place your foot on the obstacle the more lift and distance you will achieve.

Once you are confident, you can do it over objects.

2 How to Tic Tac and Horizontal Wall Run, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

Concentrate on your foot placement so you can get enough leverage off the wall to clear the object.

How to Tic Tac and Horizontal Wall Run - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan3

Then try with more steps. This is where the tic-tac turns into the horizontal wall run. 

Approach at a smaller angle between you and the wall.

How to Tic Tac and Horizontal Wall Run - Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan4

First, try with 3 steps, then 3 or more.
  
5 How to Tic Tac and Horizontal Wall Run, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

You can also use the tic-tac to help overcome higher obstacles. 

6 How to Tic Tac and Horizontal Wall Run, Parkour Tutorial for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan

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Beginners Parkour Sport Tutorial Conclusion

I hope this parkour article is enough to get you started. Once you master these basic techniques you can move onto more advanced parkour moves.

If you need more visual guidance, I recommend watching parkour videos on YouTube. Ronnie Street Stunts tutorials are where I started off, but there are many to choose from.

It is also a good idea to join a parkour group in your home town. Training with other parkour enthusiasts will push you to improve, give you hands on guidance, and is safer than training alone. Not to mention all the friends you will make.

After a while you may also want to get into freerunning. This is the more “showy” version which uses parkour flips and other techniques. Perhaps you can post your best parkour tricks on YouTube yourself one day.

Happy parkour training!

Did you enjoy this parkour tutorial for beginners? If so, please share it with your friends.

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Surviving a Natural Disaster https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/surviving-natural-disaster/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/surviving-natural-disaster/#respond Fri, 28 Sep 2018 14:31:00 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=13064 Surviving a natural disaster is difficult no matter which type of natural disaster it is. Knowing how to prepare for natural disaster will give you the best chance for survival.  In this article are 10 natural disasters types and how to survive them. List of Natural Disasters How to Escape From Fire Fire Break Construction […]

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Surviving a natural disaster is difficult no matter which type of natural disaster it is.

Knowing how to prepare for natural disaster will give you the best chance for survival. 

In this article are 10 natural disasters types and how to survive them.

List of Natural Disasters

  • How to Escape From Fire
    • Fire Break Construction
  • How to Survive a Flood
  • How to Survive a Landslide
  • Severe Thunderstorm Safety Tips
  • How to Survive a Hurricane
  • How to Survive a Tornado Outside
  • How to Survive a Blizzard in the Wilderness
    • How to Build a Snow Cave
  • How to Survive Avalanche
  • What to do During a Volcanic Eruption
  • How to Survive in an Earthquake
  • Natural Disaster Survival Conclusion

Would You Know What to Do When Disaster Strikes?
Get Your Copy of the Disaster Survival Handbook Today

Surviving a Natural Disaster

How to Escape a Fire

This will teach you how to escape fire whether you are at home, in the car, or in the wilderness. 

Signs of Fire

The first sign of fire is the smell of smoke. Animals will smell this before you so watch for strange animal behavior.
 
You may hear the roar of the fire before seeing the flames.

Fire Escape Plan for Home

A fire can destroy everything in its path. But for most people, abandoning the family home to escape from the fire is a last resort. 

To avoid this, minimize and fuel for the fire around your house:

  • Keep gutters clean.
  • Keep surrounding vegetation to a minimum.
  • Store flammable materials well.

In addition, educate your family. Have fire extinguishers in the kitchen and in other places fires are likely. Make sure everyone knows how to use them.

If a fire is approaching douse your house with water.

Have a fire escape route and use it to escape the fire if it gets too close. 

If you live in an apartment building, check the fire escape staircase works every few months. You can install fire escape stairs if you have a multilevel house.

If you do not evacuate in time, or if the fire is passing near you, stay inside. Block all the gaps around doors and windows and close all blinds and curtains.

Stay away from outside walls and wait for the fire to pass.

Once the fire passes, you can put out any small fires outside.

If the fire is inside and too big to extinguish, you must evacuate. Shut all doors on your way out to contain it.

Stay low and test door handles with the back of your hand before opening them.

Extinguishing a Fire

To put out a fire, you need to deprive it of oxygen. Smother it with sand, fire blankets, fire extinguishers, or other firefighting tools.

Water works too but if it is an electrical or oil fire, it will make it worse.

As soon as you feel you cannot control a fire get out of danger and call for help.

How to Make a Firebreak

Making a fire break is good if the fire is some distance away and there is no way of avoiding it.

The object is to burn off all the fuel in an area so that the main fire has nothing to burn.

The burnt area you create is the fire break and is safe for you to stand in.

Make sure you determine the wind direction before setting your fire.

The fire break width is as wide a line as possible. Good fire break guidelines are to make it 100+ meters wide. It can work as little as 10 meters depending on the size of the fire and strength of the wind. 

Maintaining fire breaks if you are in a bush fire area is a must.

Saving a Person on Fire

Everyone has heard of Stop, Drop, and Roll for if you catch on fire. 

Use the same principles on others on fire. This goes for animals too.

Your own safety comes first, so wait until they are clear of the main fire. 

Push them to the ground, smother them with a blanket, and tell them to roll around. The heavier the fabric of the blanket the better it will work.

Cool any burned areas of the victim’s skin with lots of water and get them to a hospital.

Vehicle Fire

It is good practice to keep a fire extinguisher in your car. Not in the trunk! It must be somewhere easy to get to. 

Beer cans make a good improvised fire extinguisher for small fires. Shake it up and open it facing the fire. The carbon dioxide will starve the fire of oxygen.

Protecting the fuel tank is the priority.

When you are in the car that catches on fire, try to put it out. If it that fails, evacuate. 

Get out of the car even if the fire is out. The fumes will be toxic.

When a vehicle is on fire in a confined space you can try to remove it from the building, but don’t get into it.

From the outside, put it in a low or reverse gear and bounce the car out with short bursts of the ignition. Be careful. It will jerk forward.

Ways to Escape a Forest Fire

When you see a fire in the wilderness, avoid it.

First try to go around it. 

The next best option is to move downhill and/or into the wind. These are the directions that fire travels the slowest. Smoke is a good indicator of wind direction.

When that is not possible, head for a natural firebreak. Natural firebreaks are things like water, a large clearing, a deep ravine, etc.

If you can’t avoid the fire, you can try to run through it as long as the vegetation is not thick.

If you plan to do this, the sooner the better.

Cover as much exposed skin as you can and soak yourself in water. Protect your mouth and nose with a damp cloth.

As a last resort, bury yourself.

Clear the area of foliage and dig as much of a hollow as possible. Throw the dirt onto a coat, blanket, or something similar.

Lie face down and pull the coat with the dirt on it over the top of yourself.

Cup your hands over your mouth and nose and try to hold your breath as fire passes over.

When you are in a vehicle, stay in it.

Don’t drive through thick smoke. Instead, park in a clear area.

If there is no clear areas, pull off the road but don’t risk getting bogged.

Turn on your headlights, shut the windows, and seal the air vents.

How to Survive Flood as a Natural Disaster

Flood is a natural disaster that often happens as an aftermath to some other disaster such as hurricanes or tidal waves. 

If you expect a flood, avoid it by getting to higher ground. 

How to Survive a Flood at Home

If you are at home or in a building during a flood, prepare survival kits and a raft as soon as possible. 

Also, turn off gas, electricity and water at the mains.

Once you are ready, move to an upper floor or roof with a shelter.

If it is a sloping roof, tie everyone on. Stay put as long as possible. 

How to Survive a Flood in a Car

When evacuating, or if caught in a flash flood in a car, be extra careful on the roads.

Do not cross water unless certain of the depth. It must be shallower than the center of your vehicles wheels or your knees if on foot.

Bridges underwater may have missing sections and even a small drop in a hill can make a big difference in water level.

If your car dies, abandon it.

How to Survive Massive Flood – The Aftermath

Once the flood is over, you need to be very careful of contamination and disease. Do not walk around in, drink, or bathe in flood water. 

Purify all water and clean anything that has come in contact with flood water before consuming it.

Don’t eat animal corpses or any fresh food that has come in contact with flood water.

Burn the dead.

What to Do during a Landslide

There can be multiple names for natural disasters. Landslides, mudslides, debris slides, etc. are all the same.

Indications of a Landslide

One of the important survival skills during landslides is to recognize when one is approaching. 

Signs of a landslide include:

  • A change from clear to muddy water.
  • Cracks appearing on your walls.
  • Doors or windows jamming.
  • Landscape changes, e.g., leaning trees.
  • Rumbling and/or cracking sounds of nature moving.
  • Widening cracks in the ground.
  • Stairs, outside walls etc. pulling away from buildings.
  • Sudden increase or decrease in water flow.
  • Water surfacing from the ground.

Landslides are most likely to occur:

  • After heavy rain.
  • After snow melt.
  • In heavy saturated ground.
  • In past landslide areas.
  • On embankments along roadsides.
  • With or after other natural disasters (earthquake, flooding, volcanic eruption, etc.)

How do you Prepare For a Landslide?

When you suspect a landslide, move away and get to high ground as fast as possible.

If you get caught in a landslide, roll into a tight ball on the ground. Protect your head.

After the Landslide

Once the landslide is over, keep away from the disaster area in case there are more.

Watch for associated dangers including broken electrical, water, gas, etc.

Repair and replant in damaged ground as soon as possible.

What to do During a Lightning Storm

In this section you will learn how to stay safe in a lightning storm including what not to do during a lightning storm.

The chances of getting struck by lightning are smaller, but you get hit your chances of survival are even smaller. 

Knowing how to stay safe during a lightning storm is as easy as staying inside. 

How to be Safe During a Lightning Storm Outdoors

When outside during a thunderstorm, avoid high ground and isolated tall objects.

You can try to find natural shelter, but not in the mouth of a cave or under an overhang of rock. Deep inside a cave is okay, but have at least one meter of space around you.

If you feel a tingling of the skin and/or hair standing on end, crouch down and place your hands on the ground. Make yourself as compact as possible and try to get on something for insulation – nothing metal or wet.

Severe Thunderstorm Safety Tips, Surviving a Natural Disaster, Survival Fitness Plan

What to do in a Blizzard

A blizzard is a snowstorm which lasts 3+ hours and has 50km+ winds.

There are also ground blizzards where it is not snowing. Instead, strong winds blow the loose snow on the ground up.

This section aims to answer the question “what should someone do if they are caught in a blizzard?”

The best advice on how to prepare for a blizzard is to take shelter until it passes.

If camping in a snow blizzard stay inside your shelter. One of the biggest dangers of camping in blizzard conditions is getting buried in snow. Make sure you have tools inside your shelter so you can dig yourself out.

How to Survive a Blizzard in Your Car

  • If you have fuel to spare run the engine for heating.
  • Cover the engine so you lose as little heat as possible, but make sure the exhaust is clear.
  • If you feel drowsy stop the engine and open a window.
  • Only keep the heater on as needed.
  • If the snow is building up get out and build a snow shelter. This will prevent you getting trapped inside the car.

How to Build a Snow Cave

Building a blizzard shelter is the answer for how to survive a blizzard outside.

An easy to build emergency snow shelter is the boy scout snow cave. Here are the steps:

  • Try to find a level site not in danger of an avalanche.
  • Make a large pile of snow and stomp it down as much as you can.
  • Wait for the pile to harden so you won’t get a snow cave collapse.
  • Dig down about a meter, then a few meters into the snow on a slight upward angle.
  • Hollow out enough space for the amount of people you have. Consider sleeping and sitting space.
  • Create a ventilation hole.
  • Put something in the entrance to stop the wind.
  • Smoothing the roof on the inside will help with dripping.
  • Consider making levels so the cold air settles beneath you.
  • Insulate the ground if you can. Greenery will work if you have nothing else.
  • Be sure snowfall does not trap you in. Keep your snow cave tools inside.

How to Build a Snow Cave, Surviving a Natural Disaster, Survival Fitness Plan

Moving in a Blizzard

If you need to move from your shelter during a blizzard, make sure you can find it again. Hang something bright off it.

Never move at night!

Tips to Survive a Hurricane

The term hurricane covers a few kinds of natural disasters including cyclones, typhoons, and other large storms. 

All these types of storms are a little different, but the steps to survive them is the same.

During a hurricane, there will be a period of calm. This is the eye of the storm and may last up to an hour before the storm picks up again.

Signs of a hurricane include:

  • Abnormal barometric pressure variations.
  • Dense cirrus clouds converging towards the storm.
  • Increased ocean swell, especially if coupled with colored sunsets or sunrises.

If you have time before the hurricane hits, go as far inland as possible and away from river banks. 

You best chance of surviving a typhoon is to stay indoors. Board up windows and secure any outdoor objects that might blow away.

Get as low as possible, e.g., in the basement.

If you are outside, try to find natural shelter such as a cave. 

A ditch is the next best place and failing that, to the lee side of any solid structure. The lee side is the side that shelters you from the wind.

If there is no shelter, lie flat on the ground.

If you move, keep as low as possible.

During the calm eye of the storm, move to the other side of your windbreak or find better shelter.

Try to stay clear of things that may turn into flying debris during the storm. Examples include fences, coconuts, small trees, etc.

When at sea during a hurricane you need to batten down the hatches, stow all gear, and take down any canvas.

If your boat is small, tie yourself to it.

Tips to Survive a Tornado

You can hear tornadoes from great distances. They sound like a spinning top. They also have a calm eye like that of a hurricane.

Your best chance for surviving a tornado is to take shelter below ground.

If there is no below-ground or re-enforced shelter, close all doors and windows.

Go to the center of the lowest floor and into a small room such as a bathroom or closet. Stay away from glass and where there is heavy furniture on the floor above you.

Get under sturdy furniture or cover your body with a mattress.

How to Survive a Tornado in a Car

Do not stay in a car or caravan unless there is no other option. Any building is better than a car.

If you have no choice, put your seatbelt on, cover yourself, and keep low. 

How to Survive a Tornado Outdoors

When there is no shelter, go to an open area.

Move at right angles to the tornado’s predicted path and take shelter in a ditch or depression.

Lie flat and cover your head with your arms.

What to do in a Volcanic Eruption

What is a volcanic eruption? A volcanic eruption is when lava and gas spurt from a volcano. It poses many threats. All are life-threatening. 

Knowing what to do in case of volcanic eruption starts with recognizing the signs.

Signs of volcanic eruption include:

  • Acid rain.
  • Signs of activeness from the volcano like rumblings, steam, etc.
  • Sulfurous smells from rivers.

What to do before a volcanic eruption? Evacuate! 

Volcanoes give warning most of the time, so the best answer for how to stay safe during a volcanic eruption is to get out of the danger zone.

Volcanic Eruption Hazards and Action

Here is what happens during a volcanic eruption and tips for how to survive a volcanic eruption.

Lava
You can outrun lava but it won’t stop until it hits a valley or cools off.

Missiles
Missiles can be of ash, rock, molten lava, etc. Wear a hard hat.

Ash and Acid Rain
Ash will make the roads slippery so be extra careful when driving. 

Cover your mouth and nose with a damp cloth or an industrial mask and wear goggles that seal around the eyes.

Once you reach shelter, remove your clothing. Wash any exposed skin well, and flush your eyes with clean water.

Gas Balls
Take refuge in an underground shelter or under water while it passes overhead.

Mud flows
Mud flows can occur during the eruption or after it has finished. Deal with them in the same way as land slides.

Knowing what to do after a volcanic eruption depends on which of the above things occurred. You will want to stay clear of the area for a while. Follow what the rescue services say.

I hope these volcano survival tips help you decide what to do before, during, and after a volcanic eruption. 

How to Survive an Avalanche

When in avalanche territory there are times and places where avalanche is more likely. They include:

  • After a rise in temperature.
  • After rain.
  • In deep, snow filled gullies.
  • In the afternoon if the morning has been sunny.
  • On angles of 30° to 45°.
  • On the side which faces away from the wind (leeward side).
  • On snow covered convex slopes.
  • Within 24 hours of snowfall lasting 2 or more hours.

When crossing avalanche territory carry an avalanche probe and a beacon.
Avoid small gullies and valleys with steep side walls. Instead, stick to ridges and high ground above avalanche paths.

After midday, keep on slopes already exposed to the sun.

Before noon, travel in shaded areas.

When in a group, which is best, keep at least 20 meters apart.

Rope together and use belays, unless skiing.

When you are skiing, ski down any slopes one at a time.

If Caught in an Avalanche

As soon as you see the avalanche approaching, get rid of access weight such as packs. 

Use the freestyle swimming stroke to stay on top of the snow.

If you can’t stay on top, cover your mouth and nose.

As soon as you stop, make as big an area as possible whilst trying to reach the surface.

To figure out where the surface is, use gravity and an object or your spit to determine which way is down. Dig up.

You can use your ski pole to poke the snow to find open air.

Note: It is common to find people buried next to trees and benches.

Tips to Survive an Earthquake

When you live in an earthquake prone area, having an earthquake preparedness plan is a must. 

How to Prepare for a Earthquake

Often you will have prior warning. If this is the case gather all useful provisions such as medical and survival kits as soon as possible. 

Prepare your home by turning off gas, electricity, and water at the mains. Also, remove large and heavy objects from high places.

Continue to listen to the media and do as instructed.

If Indoors

Here’s how to survive an earthquake at school, what to do in an earthquake in an apartment, or in any building.

The number one rule to survive and earthquake in a building is to stay inside the building. The lower you are the better, e.g., basement.

Get to one of the following (in a rough order of preference):

  • Inside a well-supported interior door frame.
  • Under a large piece of furniture (hang onto it).
  • An inside corner of the building.
  • In a hallway.

Avoid being underneath unstable objects, including on the floor above you.

Also avoid elevators, glass, the kitchen, tool sheds, etc.

How to Survive an Earthquake in a Car

When you are in a car and an earthquake hits stop in an open area and stay inside it. Crouch below seat level.

Do not stop on or under a bridge!

Be extra careful on the road when you resume driving.

How to Survive an Earthquake if You’re Outside

If you are outside during an earthquake your best bet is to find an open space and lie flat.

Beaches not below cliffs are safe during the earthquake but evacuate as soon as the major tremors finish in case of a tidal wave.

Do not go underground or in any tunnels and get away from tall structures including trees.

The safest place on a hill is on the top.

What to do After an Earthquake

After the earthquake there is likely to be structural damage. Do not take shelter in a damaged building. Build a temporary one from debris instead.

When at home, shut off electricity, gas, and water at the mains. If your gas is already off, let the gas company turn it back on.

Do not make any sparks or flames or use electricity until 100% sure there are no gas leaks. 

Keep your phone line available for emergency calls. If your phone line is down, send someone for help.

Be careful when opening cupboards.

When venturing outside, stay clear of downed electrical lines and other hazards.

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Surviving a Natural Disaster Conclusion

Now you know how to prepare for a natural disaster, and how to survive a natural disaster too.

The above natural disaster list does not include all the natural disasters you may face but I think it covers a good range.

Knowing the facts about natural disasters is important and managing natural disasters is different in different places. 

Learn the information you need to survive natural disasters in any area you plan to be in.

Did you enjoy this article about how to survive natural disasters? If so, please share it with your friends.

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Jin Shin Jyutsu Exercises for Self Help https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/jin-shin-jyutsu-exercises/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/jin-shin-jyutsu-exercises/#comments Thu, 27 Sep 2018 08:04:15 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=12246 In this article you will learn how to do Jin Shin Jyutsu exercises for general health. It includes an introduction to Jin Shin Jyutsu theory and is a good first step for becoming a self help Jin Shin Jyutsu practitioner. Contents What is Jin Shin Jyutsu? Jin Shin Jyutsu Safety Energy Locks and Flows Applying Jin Shin Jyutsu Sequences Jin […]

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In this article you will learn how to do Jin Shin Jyutsu exercises for general health.

It includes an introduction to Jin Shin Jyutsu theory and is a good first step for becoming a self help Jin Shin Jyutsu practitioner.

Contents

  • What is Jin Shin Jyutsu?
  • Jin Shin Jyutsu Safety Energy Locks and Flows
  • Applying Jin Shin Jyutsu Sequences
  • Jin Shin Jyutsu Main Central Flow
  • Jin Shin Jyutsu Diagonal Mediator Flow
  • Jin Shin Jyutsu Spleen Flow
  • Jin Shin Jyutsu Stomach Flow
  • Jin Shin Jyutsu Bladder Flow
  • Jin Shin Jyutsu Chart
  • Jin Shin Jyutsu Mudras
  • Jin Shin Jyutsu Finger Holds
  • Jin Shin Jyutsu Training Conclusion

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Jin Shin Jyutsu Exercises

What is Jin Shin Jyutsu?

Jin Shin Jyutsu is an ancient form of touch therapy. It is gentle and you can do it at a basic level with no formal training. 

Learning how to do Jin Shin Jyustu is as easy as placing your hands on certain spots of the body (SEL’s). Doing this helps to unblock stagnant energy, i.e., life-force.

Jin Shin Jyutsu Safety Energy Locks and Flows

Blood uses arteries and veins to get to different parts of the body. Life force also follows specific (although different) channels. These channels are “flows”.

There are 12 organ flows, called “function energy’s”. For example, the “Spleen Flow” is the “Spleen Function Energy.”

There are also 3 main harmonizing flows. The Main Central Flow and the 2 Supervisor Flows. Together, these 3 main flows are the Trinity Flows.

Safety Energy Locks (SEL’s) are like fuses which allow energy (life force) to flow free. If one shuts down, energy will pool and stagnate creating disharmony.

When energy becomes stuck in any area, you can free it by applying your hands on Jin Shin Jyutsu points (SEL’s) to open them.

Applying Jin Shin Jyutsu Sequences

Jin Shin Jyutsu isn’t massage, but you can do it while giving a massage. In fact, there are no set rules to Jin Shin Jyutsu. It is very much an art. Do it in how feels right for you.

Saying that, there is a consensus of the best way to do Jin Shin Jyutsu for beginners. 

Place your hands/fingers on the SEL’s for at about 2 minutes or until you feel your pulses align. You may also feel a sense of calmness.

You can skip any position that is too uncomfortable to reach. Go to the next position in the sequence.

You can also use positions and/or full Jin Shin Jyutsu massage sequences on their own, e.g., when a specific problem arises.  

Accuracy in where you place your hands/fingers is not strict. Your touch will be effective within a 3-inch radius of the exact point described.

You can do sequences from a seated position or lie down. You can also apply them to other people.

Jin Shin Jyutsu Main Central Flow

The Jin Shin Jyutsu main central flow is the most important energy flow stream in the body. All other flows connect and draw energy from this flow. It is the flow of life.

There are 8 Jin Shin Jyutsu positions in the main central energy flow.

  1. Right hand on top of your head, left fingers on your 3rd eye.
  2. Right hand on top of your head, left fingers on tip of nose.
  3. Right hand on top of your head, left fingers on V of neck.
  4. Right hand on top of your head, left fingers below the 3rd rib, at the middle of the breastbone.
  5. Right hand on top of your head, left fingers on base of the breastbone, at solar plexus.
  6. Right hand on top of your head, left fingers one inch above belly button.
  7. Right hand on top of your head, left fingers to the top of pubic bone.
  8. Right hand to your coccyx, left fingers to the top of pubic bone.

Main Central Flow, Jin Shin Jyutsu Exercises, Survival Fitness Plan

Jin Shin Jyutsu Diagonal Mediator Flow

In Jin Shin Jyutsu there are 2 diagonal flows, one for each side of the body. They make diagonal ovals across the body. This connects all the flows with the primary energy source, the Main Central Flow.

Do this on both sides of your body.

  • Make a circle with your left thumb and left ring finger. Place the pad of your thumb over the fingernail of your finger.
  • Put your right hand over your left shoulder.
  • Bring your knees together so they touch on the inside. You could also place the sole of your right foot on the inner side of your left knee instead.

How to do the Diagonal Mediator Flow, Jin Shin Jyutsu Exercises, Survival Fitness Plan

Jin Shin Jyutsu Spleen Flow

The Jin Shin Jyutsu Spleen Flow improves blood chemistry, digestive function, and problems in the nervous system. It also helps with vitality and white cell blood count. 

The proper name for the Spleen Flow in Jin Shin Jyutsu is the Spleen Function Energy Sequence.

There are 4 positions in the spleen function energy sequence. Do it on both sides of your body.

  1. Left hand on your coccyx. Right hand on the inside of your right ankle bone towards your heel (right SEL 5).
  2. Left hand on your coccyx. Right hand on the base of the center of the left rib cage (left SEL 14).
  3. Left hand below your right third rib (right SEL 13). Right hand on the base of the center of your left rib cage (left SEL 14).
  4. Left hand below the center of your left collarbone (to left SEL 22). Right hand on the base of the center of your left rib cage (left SEL 14).

How to do the Jin Shin Jyutsu Spleen Flow, Jin Shin Jyutsu Exercises, Survival Fitness Plan

Jin Shin Jyutsu Stomach Flow

This Jin Shin Jyutsu flow sequence improves congestion above the waist (such as bloat), mental stress, weight issues, and worry. 

The official name of the Jin Shin Jyustu Stomach Flow is the Stomach Function Energy Sequence.

There are 7 positions in the stomach function energy sequence. Do the sequence on both sides of your body.

  1. Right fingers at the base of your left cheekbone (left SEL 21). Left fingers on the center of your left collarbone (left SEL 22).
  2. Right fingers at the base of your left cheekbone (left SEL 21). Left fingers at the base of the center of your right front rib cage (left SEL 14).
  3. Right fingers at the base of your left cheekbone (left SEL 21). Left fingers at the small of your back (right SEL 23).
  4. Right fingers at the base of your left cheekbone (left SEL 21). Left fingers at the base of the center of your left front rib cage (to left SEL 14).
  5. Right fingers at the base of your left cheekbone (left SEL 21). Left fingers on your right inner thigh, about 3 inches above your right knee (right SEL High 1).
  6. Right fingers at the base of your left cheekbone (left SEL 21). Left fingers on your right calf, about midway between the outside of your knee and ankle. A little off your shinbone (right SEL Low 8).
  7. Right fingers at the base of your left cheekbone (left SEL 21). Hold your right middle toe with your left thumb and any finger.

How to do the Stomach Function Energy Sequence, Jin Shin Jyutsu Exercises, Survival Fitness Plan

Jin Shin Jyutsu Bladder Flow

The Jin Shin Jyutsu Bladder Flow sequence improves back stress, elimination processes of the body, and headaches. 
It also helps with muscle and leg discomfort.

There are 4 positions in the bladder function energy sequence. Do the sequence on both sides of your body.

  1. Right fingers on the side of your neck between your left ear and spine (left SEL 12). Left hand on your coccyx.
  2. Right fingers on the side of your neck between your left ear and spine (left SEL 12). Left hand on the bend in the back of your left knee.
  3. Right fingers on the side of your neck between your left ear and spine (left SEL 12). Left hand on the outside of your left ankle, below the left ankle bone (left SEL 16).
  4. Right fingers on the side of your neck between your left ear and spine (left SEL 12). Hold your left little toe with your left thumb and any finger.

How to do the Bladder Function Energy Sequence, Jin Shin Jyutsu Exercises, Survival Fitness Plan

Jin Shin Jyutsu Chart

Here is a chart with the Jin Shin Jyutsu SEL’s.

Jin Shin Jyutsu Mudras

The exploration of ancient hand mudras is how the re-discovery of Jin Shin Jyutsu began. From them come the 8 most powerful Jin Shin Jyutsu hand mudras to practice. 

Place your hands in the positions described below. Hold each mudra for 2 minutes or until you feel your pulses align and/or you feel a sense of calmness.

When doing these hand mudras keep your hands, arms, and shoulders as relaxed as possible. Don’t grip your fingers tight. Hold them loosely.

  1. Hold your left middle finger with your right hand. Your thumb is on the palm side and the rest of your fingers are on the back of the hand. Repeat this with opposite hands.
  2. Hold your left middle finger with your right hand. Your thumb is on the back of the finger and the rest of your fingers are on the palm side. Repeat this with opposite hands.
  3. Hold your left little and ring fingers with your right hand. Your thumb is on the palm side of these fingers and the rest of your fingers are on the back. Repeat this with opposite hands.
  4. Hold your left thumb, index, and middle fingers with your right hand. Your thumb is on the back and the rest of your fingers are on the palm side. Repeat this with opposite hands.
  5. Make a circle with your right thumb and right middle finger. Place the pad of your thumb over the fingernail of your finger. Place your left thumb in-between your right middle finger and right thumb. Repeat this with opposite hands.
  6. Touch the palm side of your right thumb and ring fingernail. Repeat this with opposite hands or do both hands at the same time.
  7. Touch the palm sides of your middles fingers together. Interlock the rest of your fingers.
  8. Touch the fingernails of your middle fingers together.

How to do Jin Shin Jyutsu Hand Mudras, Jin Shin Jyutsu Exercises, Survival Fitness Plan

For those of you that like to see it in action, here’s a Jin Shin Jyutsu hand mudras video. The first 2 minutes of the video is a general introduction, so I set it to start where the hand mudras start.

Jin Shin Jyutsu Finger Holds

Using the Jin Shin Jyutsu finger holds is an easy way to balance your emotions. 

Hold the finger (or thumb) on one hand with the other. The finger you hold depends on what you want to achieve.

  • Thumb. Decreases depression and worry. Improves digestion, stress, and tension in the head, shoulders and lungs.
  • Index finger. Decreases fear and self-criticism. Improves backaches, digestion, joint aches, and mouth ailments.
  • Middle finger. Decreases anger and irritability. Improves fatigue, headache, indecision, nursing mothers, and vision.
  • Ring finger. Decreases negativity and sadness.  Improves respiratory functions, skin conditions, and tinnitus (ringing in the ear).
  • Little finger. Decreases anxiety and stress. Improves bloating and heart conditions.

The more often you hold a finger the longer lasting the effect will be. A good practice for overall wellbeing is to hold each finger for a few minutes every day. If you have a specific problem, hold that finger more.

Here is a video showing the Jin Shin Jyutsu finger method. Again, the first 2 minutes is a general introduction to Jin Shin Jyutsu, so I set it to skip that.

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Jin Shin Jyutsu Training Conclusion

I hope you found this basic Jin Shin Jyutsu training useful. This only touches the surface of this ancient art. 
Although not a mainstream healing method, people all over the world are becoming more aware of it. 

You can use it to resolve minor ailments and as a supplement for more serious diseases. There are positive reports of Jin Shin Jyutsu cancer treatments.

The thing about Jin Shin Jyutsu is that it is so non-invasive that it does no harm to give it a go.

Did you find these Jin Shin Jyutsu exercises useful? If so, please share them with your friends.

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8 Basic Knots and Their Uses https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/basic-knots-and-their-uses/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/basic-knots-and-their-uses/#comments Tue, 25 Sep 2018 14:12:31 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=13275 In this article you will learn 8 basic knots and their uses. You will also learn about the different types of knots, and how to choose the right one for the job. You can use these 8 basic knots in scouting, camping, climbing, general maintenance, first aid, etc. I admit there are over 8 different […]

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In this article you will learn 8 basic knots and their uses. You will also learn about the different types of knots, and how to choose the right one for the job.

You can use these 8 basic knots in scouting, camping, climbing, general maintenance, first aid, etc.

I admit there are over 8 different knots and their uses in this article. But in trying to cover the most useful knots and uses I branched out. All the knots stem from 8 basic knots and their uses. You’ll see what I mean.

Contents

  • Basic Knot Terminology
  • The Different Types of Knots and Their Uses
  • How to Choose the Right Knot for the Job
  • 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses
    • 1. How to Tie an Overhand Knot
      • How to Tie an Overhand Loop Knot
    • 2. How to Tie a Clove Hitch Knot
      • Clove Hitch Method 2
    • 3. How to Tie a Reef Knot
    • How to Tie a Surgeons Knot
    • 4. How to tie a Round Turn and Two Half Hitches Knot
    • 5. How to Tie a Bowline Knot
      • How to Tie the Self Rescue Bowline Knot
    • 6. How to Tie an Alpine Butterfly Loop Knot
    • 7. How to Tie a Figure 8 Bend Knot
      • Tying a Figure 8 Knot
      • Tying a Figure 8 Bend Knot
      • How to Tie a Figure 8 Slip Knot
      • The Figure 8 Climbing Knot (Figure 8 on a Bight)
    • 8. Knots for Lashing
      • Square Lashing Knot
      • Diagonal Lashing Knot
      • Sheer Lashing
      • Tripod Lashing
  • Useful Knots to Know Conclusion

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Basic Knot Tying Terminology

First, I will explain the basic knot tying terminology in this post. It will make learning and tying the knots easier.

Bight

Any bend in-between the ends of the rope which does not cross over itself.

Bight, Knot Tying Terms, Survival Fitness Plan

Crossing Point

The point where the rope crosses over itself.

Crossing Point, Knot Tying Terms, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Load

Refers to the weight of the object you tie onto, e.g., if you are pulling a log then the log is the load.

Loop

Like a bight but the ends cross over creating a closed circle.

An overhand loop is when the running end lies over the top of the standing part. An underhand loop is opposite (the standing part lies on top of the running end).

Loop, Knot Tying Terms, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Rope

A generic term referring to cord, rope, string, twine, or whatever material which is being used to tie a knot.

Running End

The part of the rope used to tie the knot. Also known as the working end.

Standing End

The part of the rope other than the running end.

Shock Load

Shock load occurs when there is a sudden increase in load. In such a case the load will be much more than the actual weight of the object. An example of this is when a climber falls and his/her weight suddenly loads the rope.

Turn

A single wrap of the rope around an object. A round turn (pictured) is where the rope encircles the object.

Turn, Knot Tying Terms, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

The Different Types of Knots

Although you can use any knot any way you wish, most of them are best for specific tasks. Here they are in 5 broad categories.

Stopper Knots

Stopper knots have a few uses. They can add weight to a rope, stop the rope from slipping through a hole, stop a cut rope from fraying, etc. You can also use them as a backup knot against knot failure, i.e., tied around the standing end.

The Different Types of Knots, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Stopper Knot

Loops

Make loops by tying the rope to itself to create an enclosed circle. Their main use is as attachment points, e.g., as holds to climb up or to clip a carabineer onto it.

The Different Types of Knots, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Loop Knot

Hitches

Hitches are useful for securing the rope to an object, e.g., a boat to the jetty or around a log you wish to drag.

The Different Types of Knots, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Hitches

Bends

Use bend knots to join 2 or more lengths of rope together. This can be useful to repair broken rope or for creating a longer length from 2 shorter ones.

The Different Types of Knots, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Bend Knot

Lashing

Use lashing to join objects together. It is useful for construction.

The Different Types of Knots, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Lashing

How to Choose the Right Knot for the Job

Although all knots are useful, there will always be one that is best for the job you are doing. To decide which knot to use you must consider the characteristics of each knot. Gaining in one characteristic will mean compromising on another. You must find the knot with the best balance of these characteristics for the job you need it for.

Your choice of knot must be one that will fulfill the task you need it for. For instance, a loop knot will not be as effective for binding 2 objects together as a lashing would.

Security

Security of a knot is about its ability to stay tied and tight, i.e., not come undone on its own.

Pressure, violent movement, vibration, and other things can compromise a knot’s security.

Choose the most secure knot you can. Remember that increase in one characteristic will decrease others. , e.g., a very secure knot may become very hard to untie. This will be a problem if you need it to be “quick-release”.

Strength

Every knot will weaken the integrity of the rope, some more than others. The strength of the knot refers to how much the knot weakens the rope.

This is important when the rope needs to hold weight and/or take shock load. This characteristic becomes important when doing things such as climbing and rescue.

Ease of Tying

When you have to tie something fast or it is a repetitive job, then ease of tying becomes more important.

Ease of Untying

Sometimes you may want the knot to be easy to untie. For example, if you want to release the knot fast without cutting it.

At other times you may want the knot to be more difficult to untie. For example, if you don’t want an animal to release itself, or to stop other people from being able to untie it.

Another factor is how easy the knot will be to untie after it has done its job. Some knots are easy to untie even after baring tension or swelling underwater, or both.

8 Basic Knots and Their Uses

1. How to Tie an Overhand Knot

This is the simplest of knots and is the basis of many other knots. Overhand knots are difficult to untie once tightened.

Make an underhand loop by taking the running end of the rope and passing it under the standing end.

Overhand1, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Pass the running end through the loop from the front to the back.

OverhandKnot2, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Pull both ends to tighten it.

You can make the overhand knot bulkier by passing the running end through the loop more times. Push the first turn into the middle of the knot.

OverhandKnot3, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Doing it twice makes a double overhand and doing it 3 or more times creates a blood knot.

OverhandKnot4, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Overhand Loop

You can use the overhand knot can to create a loop. It works well with fishing line but can be hard to untie.
Double up the rope to make a bight and then tie an overhand knot in the bight.

Overhand Loop 1, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

2. How to Tie a Clove Hitch

Clove hitches are a useful base for many other knots (such as lashing a tripod) and are good in their own right for binding.

There are 2 sets of clove hitch knot instructions.

This first method is good for when the rope is not under strain as you are tying it and you can slip it over your object.

Make 2 loops in the rope which face opposite directions as pictured below.

Clove1, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Put the right loop over the left one.

Clove2, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Put both loops over the object and pull the running end and the standing end apart to tighten the knot.

Clove3, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Clove Hitch Method 2

Here’s an alternative method for how to tie a clove hitch knot step by step. Follow the clove hitch diagrams if you have troubles.

Wrap the running end of the rope around the object you wish to tie onto. The running end crosses over the standing end.

Clove5, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Wrap the running end around a second time and then pass it underneath itself.

Clove6, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Pull it tight as before.

3. How to do a Reef Knot

A reef knot (square knot) is a good binding knot that’s easy to tie and untie.

Reef knot uses does NOT include joining 2 ropes together. There are far better joining-knots available.

To tie a reef knot put the rope around the object you want to bind.

Take the left end and pass it over the right from the bottom and then tuck it under the right end.

Reef1, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Now take this new right end and cross it over the left end and then tuck it under.

Pull the left strands and the right strands apart to tighten the knot.

Reef2, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

An easy way to remember how to make a reef knot is with the rhyme “left over right and under, right over left and under.”

How to Tie a Surgeons Square Knot

A more secure version of tying a reef knot is the surgeons knot.

To tie a surgeons knot, make an extra turn when tying the “left over right” part of a reef knot. This keeps the knot in place while you tie the rest of the knot.

Surgeons1, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

You could also make an extra turn in the “right over left” part to make it even more secure.

Surgeons2, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

4. Round Turn and Two Half Hitches

This knot is fast to tie and very secure. It is also easy to untie even when placed under heavy strain.

To create the round turn, loop the running end of the rope around your object so the rope envelops it.

RoundTurn1, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Tie a half hitch by bringing the running end behind the standing end. Make a turn around the standing end. Next, thread it through the gap you made between the running and standing ends.

Roundturn2, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Create a second half hitch, in the same way, ensuring it is underneath the first half hitch. Pull both ends to tighten.

RoundTurn3, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

In learning to tie a round turn and two half hitches you also learn how to tie the half hitch knot.

Adding the round turn makes it more secure, but if you don’t have enough rope, then tying half hitches may suffice.

5. Tying a Bowline on a Bight

A bowline is a fixed loop that will neither tighten nor slip under strain.

The main bowline knot uses are to tie around things you want to secure/tether, e.g., a raft or a person.

To learn how to tie a bowline knot around something, hold the rope in your right hand with the standing end at the rear.

Make an overhand loop so that the loop faces to the left.

Bowline1, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Pass the running end up through the loop you made and then around the back of standing end.

Bowline2, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

The running end then goes over the crossing point and back through the original loop.

Pull the standing end and the doubled-up running end in opposite directions. This will tighten it.

Bowline3, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

You can finish the bowline off with a stopper knot (e.g., overhand) tied to the side of the loop.

Bowline4, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Once you can tie the bowline practice doing it around things. It changes the orientation so you will need to practice it.

How to Tie a Bowline Around Your Waist

The self-rescue bowline is good for if you find yourself in a “man-overboard” situation. It is tying a bowline around your waist with only one hand.

Wrap the rope around your waist so that both the standing and running ends are to your front. Your waist is between them. In this demonstration, the running end is on your right.

Hold the running end in your right hand allowing at least 15cm of rope beyond your hand.

Without letting go of the running end bring it over the standing part to make a crossing point.

SelfRescueBowline1, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Bring it up through the gap created between your body and the crossing point. This will wrap the rope around your hand.

SelfRescueBowline2, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Using your fingers, but without letting go of the rope, pass the running end under the standing part. Do it after the first crossing point. This creates a second crossing point.

SelfRescueBowline3, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Maneuver the running end with your fingers so it feeds between the 2 crossing points. It feeds from the top down. It should end with you holding the running end.

SelfRescueBowline4, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Next, pull your hand out from the loop on your wrist bringing the running end with you. Pull the knot tight.

SelfRescueBowline5, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

6. The Alpine Butterfly Loop

The alpine butterfly loop (lineman’s loop) is a useful knot for creating a fixed loop in the middle of a rope. It is secure, can bear weight in several directions, and is easy to untie even after a heavy load.

Amongst other things, the butterfly loop is good to shorten a rope or to exclude a damaged section. Doing so is better than cutting a rope since a re-joined rope has less strength.

Get a bight of the rope and twist it 2 times in the same direction. You will have 2 crossing points and thus 2 loops.

Butterfly Loop 1 , 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

For ease of explanation, the loop furthest away from the ends of the rope will be loop one. The loop between the ends of the rope and loop one will be loop 2.

Grab the tip of the bight of loop one and bring it beyond the crossing point of loop 2.

Butterfly Loop 2, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Next, bring the tip of loop one up through loop 2.

Alpine Butterfly Loop3, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Pull all ends to tighten.

Alpine Butterfly 4, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

7. Figure 8 Bend Knot

The figure 8 bend is a good way to join 2 ropes together. It is also good for making a prusik loop of rope which you can use for ascending.

It is best done with ropes of equal width.

First you need to learn how to tie a figure 8 stopper knot

How To Tie a Figure 8 Knot

A figure of 8 knot can do all the same things as the overhand knot but is much easier to untie.

Here’s how to tie a figure 8 knot step by step.

Make an upward facing overhand loop and then make the running end pass back under the standing end.

Figure 8 1, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Pass the running end back through the first loop you made. Pull both ends away from each other to tighten the knot.

Figure 8 2, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Tying the Figure 8 Bend Knot

Tie a loose figure 8 at the end of one rope.

With the other rope follow the path of the original figure 8.

Fig8Bend1, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Ensure that there is no crossover in the rope and that the ends face in an opposite direction.

Pull on all ends to tighten.

Fig8Bend2, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

How to Tie a Slip Knot

To tie a figure 8 slip knot, put the running end back through the first loop before tightening the knot.

To release the knot pull the running end.

You can also do this with the overhand knot.

Figure 8 Slip Knot, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

How to Tie a Figure 8 Loop Knot

Like the overhand knot, you can turn the figure 8 into a fixed loop by making the figure 8 on a bight.

Fig8Loop, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

To tighten it pull on each loose end, i.e., on the loop and the running/standing ends.

Work the knot so it is neat with no crossover on the rope. This will keep the knot strong and easier to untie.

8. How to Lash

Lashes are useful basic knots for scouts or any outdoor enthusiast. Use them to join objects together.

Described here are 4 types of lashing. For all, you will need quite a long running-end.

The Square Lashing Knot

Use square lashing to hold poles together at a 90° angle.

Place 2 poles together in a cross formation so that the vertical one is on top of the horizontal one.

On the vertical pole, below the horizontal one, tie a clove hitch.

Pass the running end under the horizontal pole, on the right side of the vertical pole. Next, pass it over the vertical one, on the upper side of the horizontal pole.

Square1 - How to Lash, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Pass the running end under the horizontal pole on the left side. Pull it tight so that the clove hitch slips to the right side of the vertical pole.

Continue to pass the rope over the verticals and then under the horizontals. This is in an anti-clockwise fashion. Pull each pass tight as you go. Make 3 full rotations.

Square2 - How to Lash, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

The long end of the rope should finish having come underneath the right side of the horizontal pole. Bring it back to the front of the horizontal pole and then behind the lower end of the vertical pole. This is frapping. Pull it tight.

Square3, How to Lash, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Go over the left side of the horizontal and then under the top side of the vertical and pull it tight. This is one frapping rotation. Do 3 frapping rotations and then tie a clove hitch on the lower side of the vertical pole.

When doing the clove hitch, pull the first half hitch tight before doing the second.

Square4, How to Lash, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Trim any excess away and/or tuck it under the lashing.

The Diagonal Lashing Knot

Use diagonal lashing when the poles do not cross at right angles. It is also useful for when you need to pull the poles toward each-other for tying.

Cross 2 poles on top of each other. Tie a surgeons knot around them so that the running end is to the right.

Pass the running end back behind the poles so it is on the left side.

Diagonal1, How to Lash, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Bring the running end over and under the poles. Pull it tight. Do this 3 times.

The running-end finishes on the left. Go over the bottom left pole and then under the cross so it comes over the top. Pull it tight.

Diagonal2, How to Lash, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Do 3 vertical turns pulling tight after each one. Your running end finishes running down.

Do some frapping turns by passing the rope under then over each pole in an anti-clockwise fashion. Keep it tight. Do 3 full rotations.

Diagonal3, How to Lash, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Finish it with a clove hitch and trim if needed.

Diagonal4, How to Lash, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

How to Tie a Sheer Lashing

Follow these sheer lashing instructions to learn how to join 2 poles together side by side.

Sheer lashing has a few names:

  • Parallel lashing
  • Pole lashing
  • Round Lashing

Put 2 poles together side by side so they lay horizontal. Tie one clove hitch around both the poles to the left of where you intend to make the rest of the lashing.

Lay the short end between the 2 poles to the right of your clove hitch so you will lash over them.

Sheer1, How to Lash, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Wrap the running end around the 2 poles pulling it tight after each turn.

Do at least as many turns so that the lashing is the same length as the width of the 2 poles.

Sheer2, How to Lash, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Do frapping turns by passing the rope between the 2 poles. Start at the right side and then come back up between them on the left. This should be hard to do since you pulled the lashing turns tight.

Do 2 frapping turns and finish it with a clove hitch on the end of one pole.

Sheer3, How to Lash, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Note: You can place wedges between the 2 poles instead of frapping.

You can make an A-Frame lashing by doing a loose sheer lashing.

Pull the legs apart to make the A-Frame.

A-Frame1, How to Lash, 8 Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

How to Lash a Tripod

Lashing a tripod is sheer lashing 3 poles together and then pulling them into place.

Tie a clove hitch around one pole, not the middle one.

Tripod Lashing 1, Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Wrap the rope around all 3 poles so they are stay parallel.

Weaving the rope around the poles also works.

Tripod Lashing 2, Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Make frapping turns where the poles meet.

Tripod Lashing 3, Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Finish with a clove hitch on the end pole.

Tripod Lashing 4, Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Cross the 2 outer poles to make a rope lashing tripod.

Tripod Lashing 5, Basic Knots and Their Uses, Survival Fitness Plan

Tripod Lashing images credit: Lwan98 [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY-SA 2.5 ], from Wikimedia Commons

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Common Knots and Their Uses Conclusion

Now you know a bunch of scout knots and their uses. They are also useful knots for camping, climbing, and a range of other things.

Learning how to tie useful knots is a handy skill. And knowing the different kinds of knots and their uses will help you choose the right knot for the job.

Did you find these 8 kinds of knots and their uses useful? If so, please share it with your friends.

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Survival Outdoor Rope Climbing Techniques for Beginners https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/outdoor-rope-climbing-techniques/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/outdoor-rope-climbing-techniques/#respond Sun, 23 Sep 2018 14:20:27 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=13311 Learn outdoor rope climbing techniques with no climbing gear other than rope and what you can make from it.  It includes how to to climb rope with and without a harness, and how to make a rope climbing harness. You will also learn climbing rope techniques for descending with and without your self-made harness. To practice […]

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Learn outdoor rope climbing techniques with no climbing gear other than rope and what you can make from it. 

It includes how to to climb rope with and without a harness, and how to make a rope climbing harness.

You will also learn climbing rope techniques for descending with and without your self-made harness.

To practice these rope climbing exercises you will need rope for climbing and some basic knowledge of knots. Rope for rock climbing works best for most of these.

You can find instructions on how to tie the knots you need in this post.

Contents

    Climbing Rope Without a Harness
    • Brake and Squat
    • Make a Rope with Knots to Climb
    • Make a Rope Climbing Ladder
    • How to Climb a Rope Ladder
  • How to Rapel Without a Harness
  • How to Make a Rope Harness
    • How to Tie a Triple Bowline Harness
    • How to Tie a Swiss Seat Rope Harness
  • Climbing a Rope with a Prusik
    • How to Tie a Prusik Knot for Climbing
    • Prusik Knot Ascending
    • Prusik Knot Climbing Without a Harness
  • How to Climb a Rope Conclusion

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Outdoor Rope Climbing Techniques

Climbing Rope Without a Harness

These static rope climbing skills are useful when bouldering is too dangerous and you aren’t able to make a prusik. 

Brake and Squat

If you want to climb the rope without a harness, and it is a thicker rope, try the brake and squat method.

This works well with climbing gym rope and is good for rope climbing crossfit workouts.

It is the classic military rope climb method, and you can also use it as a gymnastics rope climb.
    
Let the rope fall to the outside of one of your legs and step on it with your closest foot. Put your other foot underneath the rope.

You are now in the basic position.

Grab the rope as high as possible and hang off it. 

Bring your feet up as high as possible. Pull yourself up and bring your knees to your chest and place them in the basic position.

The basic position locks the rope in so you can stand (and rest if needed). 

Reach up as high as you can again and repeat the process.

1 Brake and Squat, Climbing Rope Without a Harness, Survival Fitness Plan

You can do this rope climb exercise at home if you can find a good place to hang crossfit climbing rope. Get some here.

Make a Rope with Knots to Climb

A series of overhand knots tied at intervals along a smooth rope will make climbing much easier.

Climbing a knot rope is another good rope climb exercise. You can get a decent rope climb workout from it.

How to Make a Rope Climbing Ladder

Climbing a rope ladder is yet another way to get a good workout climbing rope.

One way to make a rope ladder is to tie as many fixed loops (butterfly loops work well) in a rope as you need hand and footholds.

Another way is by using 2 ropes, or one rope doubled up.

Tie fixed loops opposite each other along the ropes. Alpine butterflies or figure 8 loops work well.

As you tie the loops, put sticks (the rungs of the ladder) in them. Ease the knot tight around them to hold them in place. 

Allow the rung ends to protrude out the sides of the knots so they will not slip out.

How to Climb a Rope Ladder

For the knot ladder you will need to exercise your rope climbing muscles a little. Always keep two hands on the rope and rest with your feet on top of the knots.

The best way to climb a rope ladder with rungs is to climb up the side of it instead of the normal way. 

So one hand and one foot on one side, and the other hand and foot on the other. You still hold and step on the middle of the rungs between the rope sides. 

Always keep at least 3 points of contact on the ladder.

How to Rapel Without Harness

You can learn how to rappel without a harness using the Dulfersitz method. You may wish to use rope climbing gloves for protection.

For this to work, you need a rope at least twice the length of the distance you wish to descend. It must also be strong enough to hold your weight. 

Find the middle of the rope and wrap it around a solid anchor. Ensure it is not rubbing against any sharp edges and test its stability with all your weight. Jerk on it to make sure.

Pass both ends of the rope between your legs from front to back and then to the left of your body. Continue it over your right shoulder and down your back.

2 How to Rapel Without a Harness, Survival Fitness Plan

For comfort, you can put padding around your shoulders and groin.

Hold the rope in front with your left hand and at the back with your right.

Plant your feet against the slope about 45cm apart and lean back so that the rope supports your weight. Do not hold yourself up with your hands.

Step downwards while lowering your hands one at a time.

Go slow!

How to Make a Rope Harness

In this section you will learn how to make 2 types of improvised rope harnesses so you can climb a rope safer.

One is the triple bowline. The other is the more complicated (but more comfortable) swiss seat. 

Improvised rope harnesses may not be that comfortable but they are useful to know.

How to Tie a Triple Bowline Harness

A triple bowline is a bowline made with a doubled-up line.

It produces 3 loops which you can use as a sit sling or a lifting harness. One loop goes around each thigh and the third will go around the chest.

Tie it in the same way as a bowline using the “middle” of the rope, i.e., do not use the ends. The running end must protrude out long enough to create the third loop.

3 Triple Bowline, How to Make a Harness, Survival Fitness Plan

When using this to haul people be careful of the pressure the rope on the chest. You can make a foot loop to ease the pressure.

How to Tie a Swiss Seat Rope Harness

The swiss seat rappel harness is sturdy enough to use for anything a commercial harness can do. It won’t be comfortable, but it will work.

Swiss seat webbing will be more comfortable but rock climbing rope will work too.

To make a swiss seat rappelling harness, first find the center of the rope. Loop it around your waist and tie the first half of a surgeon’s knot at your front.

4 Swiss Seat Harness, How to Make a Harness, Survival Fitness Plan

Pass the ends between your legs. Now tuck them up through the wrap you made around your waist, on either side of your waist.

5 Swiss Seat Harness 2 How to Make a Harness, Survival Fitness Plan

Pull down on the ends as you do a few squats. This will tighten it and check for comfortability. Next, do a full wrap around your “belt” with each end of the rope.  

6 Swiss Seat Harness 3, How to Make a Harness, Survival Fitness Plan

Tie the ends together using a reef knot. Do it off center.

Make half hitches with the left-over rope that goes around both “belts”.

7 Swiss Seat Harness 4, How to Make a Harness, Survival Fitness Plan

Climbing a Rope with a Prusik

Prusiking up a rope is a safe way to ascend when there is no easy way to climb out. You can also use it in reverse to descend.

It is a good way of climbing a tree with rope and gives a good rope climbing workout too. 

The first thing you must do is create 2 closed loops. These will be your prusik loops. Many types of knots can make a closed loop but most of them are not safe to use when prusiking.

Climbers often use a double fisherman’s knot but a faster way is to use a figure 8 bend. The figure 8 bend is also easier to tie than a double fisherman’s and easier to untie, even after your weight has been on it. Refer to the post on bend knots for instructions on how to tie a figure 8 bend.

Make your 2 prusik loops from a rope with a thickness of about half the diameter of the rope you will ascend. Have one rope about as long as you are high plus 20cm, and the second rope twice your height.

The rope you use for your prusik loops must strong enough to hold you if you fall. Being able to hold your weight is not enough. It has to be strong enough to handle the shock load.

How to Tie a Prusik Knot for Climbing

Once you have made your prusik loops use the prusik hitch to attach them to the rope you want to climb.

To tie a prusik hitch put the loop on your main line with the joining knot (figure 8 bend) facing the right.

8 Prusik Knot, Climbing a Rope with a Prusik, Survival Fitness Plan

With the knotted side, wrap your prusik loop around the main line.

9 Prusik Knot 2, Climbing a Rope with a Prusik, Survival Fitness Plan

Do it at least twice. The more wraps you make the more friction you will have.

Ease the loops tight. As you do so ensure all the lines are neat next to each other. Do not let them overlap/cross each-other.

Also, as you tighten it, do your best to position the fig 8 bend close to the main-line.

10 Prusik Knot 3, Climbing a Rope with a Prusik, Survival Fitness Plan

Prusik Knot Ascending

Using prusik knots to ascend is a good way of climbing a tree with a rope.

Tie both prusik loops onto the main line using prusik hitches. Tie the smaller prusik loop above the larger one.

A prusik hitch works because you can slide it up but when there is downward tension it does not slip. Test it well with all your weight before using it to climb. If needed, add extra turns.

Attach the top prusik loop to your harness.

Note: Rope on rope friction can cut rope. If you have a carabiner, use it. If not, be extra careful there is not too much friction between your harness and the prusik loop.

Slide the top prusik loop up as high as you can reach.

Slide the bottom prusik loop to about head height, or as high as possible so you can still put your foot in it.

Put your foot in the loop and stand up. The joining knot of the prusik loop is the weak part so keep off it.

Slide the top prusik loop as high as possible and then put your weight on it by sitting in your harness.

Now slide your bottom prusik loop up as high as possible and put your foot in it. Stand up and slide the top prusik loop up again.

Repeat this motion.

To use a prusik knot for rappeling, reverse the motions.

11 Prusik Knot Ascention, Climbing a Rope with a Prusik, Survival Fitness Plan

Prusik Knot Climbing Without a Harness

It is possible to ascend using prusik loops with no harness but doing so is risky and you will use more energy. It requires more strength and stamina.

Make your loops smaller than usual and have at least two. Four is best.

Assuming you are using four prusik loops, the top 2 are for your hands and the bottom two are for your feet. You want them all to be snug so you can slide them up with minimal movement.

Place your feet in the two bottom prusik loops and hold on to the top ones with your hands.

Slide your hands up with the top prusik loops as high as you can. Pull yourself up and use your legs to slide the bottom prusik loops up as high as you can.

Stand up whilst sliding the top prusik loops up again.

Repeat this process.

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Climbing Rope Technique Conclusion

Now you know all the outdoors climbing rope skills you need for if you have no special rope climbing gear. 

You can do rope climbing gymnastics using the methods for climbing rope without a harness. This includes army rope climb techniques and how to make a rope ladder.

The safest way to rappel without a harness is the Dulfersitz method.

For how to rope climb a tree or rock face, make a harness. You now know how to tie a swiss seat harness and the easier but less comfortable triple bowline harness.

The last of the rope climbing training is solo rope climbing with prussiks.

Whether rope climbing at home as a fun backyard rope climb activity, rope climbing in gym class, indoor rope climbing on a rope climbing course, or practicing tree climbing techniques with rope, safety is paramount.

Many of these rope climbing tips infer solo climbing with rope, but having a buddy is for safety is smart.

Did you find this article about how to rope climb useful? If so, please share it with your friends.

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Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/outdoor-bouldering-for-beginners/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/outdoor-bouldering-for-beginners/#respond Fri, 21 Sep 2018 06:44:20 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=12852 In this guide to outdoor bouldering for beginners you will learn all the beginners rock climbing techniques you need to have fun and stay safe.  Contents Bouldering Vs Climbing The Benefits of Rock Climbing Rock Climbing Fundamentals Rock Climbing Grips Technique Rock Climbing Foot Techniques Tips for the Different Types of Climbing Faces Basic Crack Climbing […]

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In this guide to outdoor bouldering for beginners you will learn all the beginners rock climbing techniques you need to have fun and stay safe. 

Contents

  • Bouldering Vs Climbing
  • The Benefits of Rock Climbing
  • Rock Climbing Fundamentals
  • Rock Climbing Grips Technique
  • Rock Climbing Foot Techniques
  • Tips for the Different Types of Climbing Faces
  • Basic Crack Climbing Techniques
  • Bouldering for Beginners Conclusion

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Bouldering Vs Climbing

Bouldering is rock climbing without special equipment such as ropes and harnesses. And you don’t climb high. No higher than is safe to fall.

Often people bouldering will still use climbing shoes and chalk. These things make bouldering easier but are not 100% necessary. 

For safety I recommend using a crash mat to pad your fall. Check out some crash mats here.

In this article, I use the terms bouldering and rock climbing interchangeably. 

Bouldering and rock climbing techniques are the same as far as rock climbing for beginners goes. 

Rock climbing with ropes requires technical knowledge to use the equipment safely. 

This article on rock climbing focuses on bouldering technique for beginners. You don‘t need any special climbing equipment.

The Benefits of Rock Climbing

There a many rock climbing benefits. Here are a few off the top of my head:

  • A bouldering workout plan. Using bouldering for fitness is a fun way to keep in shape. If you want to get toned up, a bouldering workout routine will get you there faster than most other sports, and it’s more interesting than hitting the gym.
  • Make friends. You may think of climbing as a solo-sport, but it really isn’t. Although you can do it alone, I recommended having at least one person to do it with. Apart from that, climbing communities are close-knit in most cities. Everyone has the same passion and a similar mindset.
  • See the world in a new light. When beginning rock climbing, you will see things from a different perspective. Rocks, trees, buildings, and anything else that you might climb.
  • Get outdoors. Although there are plenty of indoor climbing gyms for those rainy days, outdoor bouldering will get you into nature. Going outside is also cheap rock climbing since you don’t have to pay gym fees. And there are no “gym rules” you need to stick by. You could try out barefoot rock climbing.
  • Improve your mind. Climbing isn’t only muscle and technique. A lot of your success depends on choosing a strategic route. There will also be times when you will want to give up from sore muscles. Mind of matter will get you through.
  • A useful “flight” skill. This is the main reason I outline the basics of rock climbing on this website. Knowing how to climb may save your life one day.

Rock Climbing Fundamentals

When beginning rock climbing you need to start with the basic principles. 

In fact, if the only things you learn from this climbing article are these bouldering fundamentals, you will be a better climber than most people on the planet. 

The rock climbing term “holds” refers to what you place your feet and hands onto to climb. They are what you ‘hold’ onto.

Climb With Your Legs

As far as rock climbing basics go, you can’t get more fundamental than to climb with your legs. 

Your legs do the climbing, not your arms. Though you often need a little pull-up, your arms are primarily for keeping balance. 

To conserve energy, move your feet up the wall first and use your leg muscles to push you up. Once balanced, rest your weight over your legs. 

Don’t use your arms to hold you up. This will tire your out too fast.

Here are more leg-related beginner rock climbing tips:

  • Step light and place your foot carefully and firmly. Don’t ‘stomp’ into the holds.
  • Use the edges of your feet or the ball of your big toe.
  • Press your foot downwards and into the wall.
  • Trust you can stand.

Plan Your Route

Plan your route before you climb and at least one move ahead whilst climbing. Know where you will place your foot of hand before taking it off the hold.

You can adjust your plan as needed while you are climbing.

Climb Smooth

Climbing smooth means to be fluid. Don’t pause between moves. Planning your route is essential for you to achieve this.

It doesn’t mean you can never stop. Look 3 or 4 moves ahead and plan where you think a good ‘rest point’ will be. Climb smooth until you get there and then rest and plan your next moves. 

Another part of climbing smooth is to breathe. Like with all physical activities, holding your breath will stifle your movement and also wear you out faster.

Gaining Reach

Reaching to grab holds will drain your energy. Though it is necessary sometimes, there are other ways to grain reach which you can try first.

  • Reach Backwards. Turn away from the hold and reach backwards for it. It is like reaching for something far under a bed.
  • Stand Up. Stand straight and keep your hips close to the wall with your weight over your feet. This is as opposed to leaning against the rock.
  • Bumping. Gain momentum off one hold to reach a better one.

The key takeaway from the above bouldering tips for beginners is to conserve your energy. 

Rock Climbing Grips Technique

In this section you will learn the different bouldering grips and which rock climbing holds to use them on.

To conserve energy, only grip a hold as hard as you need to. 

Edges

Edges are horizontal holds that have an edge you can grab onto. They can be flat or may have a lip wish you can pull on.

Crimp Grip
To grab an edge, use the crimp grip. This is where you grab the edge with your fingertips flat and your fingers arched above the tips.
 
Crimping too hard can cause tendon damage.

Full Crimp
The full crimp is when you place the pads of your fingertips on an edge and curl your fingers so that you flex the second joint.

Press your thumb on top of the index finger’s fingernail to secure the grip.

1 Full Crimp, Rock Climbing Grips Technique, Survival Fitness Plan

Half Crimp
If you let your thumb press against the side of your index finger, you are using the half crimp.

The half crimp is weaker but less damaging to your fingers. 

If you can, use the half crimp.

2 Half Crimp, Rock Climbing Grips Technique, Survival Fitness Plan

Slopers

Slopers are round handholds without an edge.

They are easiest to grab if they are above you.
 
When griping a sloper, use the open hand grip and keep your arms straight for leverage.

3 Slopers, Rock Climbing Grips Technique, Survival Fitness Plan

Open Hand Grip
The Open Hand Grip uses the friction against the rock surface.

Wrap your hand onto the hold with your fingers close together. Feel around with your fingers to find grip spots.

Also, feel around with your thumb to see if there is a bump you can press against.

4 Open Hand Grip, Rock Climbing Grips Technique, Survival Fitness Plan

Pinches

Pinches are holds which you can grip by pinching with your fingers on one side and your thumb on the other. 

If the pinch hold is small, use your thumb opposed to your index finger with your middle finger stacked on top. 

With larger pinch holds, oppose your thumb with all your fingers.

5 Pinches, Rock Climbing Grips Technique, Survival Fitness Plan

Side Pulls

Side pulls are holds you pull on sideways instead of straight down. You would do this depending on the orientation of the hold. 

You can pull outward on the side pull while pushing a foot in the opposite direction to keep you in place. 

6 Side Pulls, Rock Climbing Grips Technique, Survival Fitness Plan

Pockets

Pockets are holes in the rock surface which you can place one or more of your fingers in. Insert as many fingers as you can comfortably fit.

Use your strongest fingers first. Feel inside the pocket to find a surface you can pull against.

7 Pockets, Rock Climbing Grips Technique, Survival Fitness Plan

Gastons

A gaston is a vertical or diagonal hold, usually to your front.

Grab a gaston with your fingers and palm facing the rock and your thumb pointing downward.

Bend your elbow at a sharp angle and point it away from your body.

Crimp your fingers on the edge and pull outward.

8 Gastons, Rock Climbing Grips Technique, Survival Fitness Plan

Undercling

An undercling is any hold you have to grip on its underside. To do it correctly requires body tension and opposition.

Grip the rock with your palm facing up and your thumb pointing out.

Pull out on the undercling and push your feet against the wall.

8 Undercling, Rock Climbing Grips Technique, Survival Fitness Plan

Palming

If no handhold exists, you can keep your hand in place by pushing into a dimple in the rock with the heel of your palm.

9 Palming, Rock Climbing Grips Technique, Survival Fitness Plan

Matching Hands

The matching hands rock climbing technique is when you you place your hands next to each other on the same hold so you can change hands.

10 Matching Hands, Rock Climbing Grips Technique, Survival Fitness Plan

You can do a similar technique with your feet. Do so by slowly replacing the foot and without jumping.

You can also do it with a hand and foot.

11 Matching Hands 2, Rock Climbing Grips Technique, Survival Fitness Plan

While matching is important to know, try not to use it. 

It is better to reach for an extra hold over so your trailing hand can have its own hold.

Reaching will cause fatigue, but matching increases the chance of falling. Ideally you want to do neither of these rock climbing skills, but if you have no choice, reaching is better than matching.

Rock Climbing Foot Techniques

We covered hand climbing techniques for beginners. Now we will focus on the legs and feet.

Smearing

Smearing is like palming for the feet. 

Push the flat of your foot hard on the wall, using friction to hold you up. 

If you want to go up direct the force a little downward. 

Return to a foothold as soon as you can.

12 Smearing, Rock Climbing Foot Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan

Back Stepping

Back stepping is one of the basic rock climbing techniques for gaining reach. 

Step on a hold so that the outside of your hip faces into the rock. You will have a longer reach in the same direction as the foot you back stepped. 

Drop one knee toward the ground with the other pointing up for an exaggerated back step.

13 Backstepping, Rock Climbing Foot Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan

Flagging

Use flagging to balance your body when reaching for a hold.

Cross one foot behind the other to avoid swinging out from the rock. 

14 Flagging, Rock Climbing Foot Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan

Mantle

You can use the mantle to climb up onto a ledge that you are hanging off. This bouldering technique uses your hands and feet. 

Pull yourself up onto a ledge by rocking sideways. Turn your hand around and push yourself up until you can place a foot and stand up. 

15 Mantle, Rock Climbing Foot Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan

If you want to build strength for mantling, one of the best rock climbing exercises for beginners is the pull up.

Stemming

Stemming is a good rock climbing tips for beginners to climb opposing walls, or “chimneys”.

This is another of my climbing tips for beginners that uses your hands and feet. 

To do stemming, press one foot into one of the walls and your other foot against the other. Push out with an opposing force to hold your weight up. 

Do the same with your hands. 

Hold your weight with your arms/hands and shift both feet up.

Once you are stable on your feet, hold your weight with your legs and move your hands up. Repeat this ‘shuffling’ with your hands and feet to climb the chimney.

16 Stemming, Rock Climbing Foot Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan

Hooking

Heel and toe hooks can aid in balance and provide leverage for movement. 

There are many ways to use the hook, e.g., with your foot to climb onto a ledge. 

17 Hooking, Rock Climbing Foot Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan

You can hook under a rock to keep stability whilst negotiating an overhang.

18 Hooking 2, Rock Climbing Foot Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan

Tips for the Different Types of Climbing Faces

The final section of outdoor and indoor rock climbing for beginners is how to climb different types of faces.

Climbing Slabs

A slab is any rock face than is at an angle less than 90°. 

9 Palming, Rock Climbing Grips Technique, Survival Fitness Plan

To climb a slab, keep your weight centered on your feet. As you climb, be precise with your toe placement. 

Stand upright on the rock and away from the slab surface. 

Aim for big holds but don’t make big steps to get to them. It is better to make small steps on small footholds and then reach once you reach your big hold target. Plan 3 to 5 of your intended foot holds ahead at a time.

Look for variations in the surface and smear on tiny holds. You can also feel the hold with a finger to find the best spot for your foot placement.

20 Climbing Slabs 2, Types of Climbing Faces, Survival Fitness Plan

Climbing Vertical Faces

Vertical faces are at a 90° angle, i.e., straight up, or near enough. This is the type of face you commonly see climbers with ropes climbing.

When climbing vertical faces, have an upright body position and keep your weight over your feet as much as possible.

Use your hands and arms for pulling if needed. 

21 Climbing Vertical Faces, Types of Climbing Faces, Survival Fitness Plan

Climbing Overhangs

Overhangs are rock faces that are overhung or angled over 90°. 

Climbing an overhang is one of the hardest rock climbing techniques for beginners to do. This is because it requires more strength.

Use heel and toe hooks to take the weight off your arms.

22 Climbing Overhangs, Types of Climbing Faces, Survival Fitness Plan

Basic Crack Climbing Techniques

You can climb the natural cracks in rocks by wedging your body parts into them.

This rock climbing technique is jamming. Jamming in crack climbing holds can cut your hands. Over time you can condition them, but to prevent injury when you first practice this basic bouldering technique you can tape your hands. 

Hand Jam

Perform a hand jam by wedging the side of your hand in the crack with the thumb on top. 

Tuck your thumb into the palm of your hand.

23 Hand Jam, Basic Crack Climbing Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan

Next, expand your hand to exert opposing pressure against the walls of the crack.

Once conditioned, you can hang your weight off your wedged hand.

24 Hand Jam 2, Basic Crack Climbing Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan

You can also do this in smaller cracks with your finger. This is finger crack climbing and is an advanced crack climbing technique.

Foot Jam

After jamming your hands into the crack, lift a foot and push the front part of your shoe into the crack. 

Stand up on the jammed foot.

Step the other foot up to calf level and jam it in the crack. 

25 Foot Jam, Basic Crack Climbing Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan

Shuffling

Now that your hands and feet are in position, you can move upward by shuffling. 

There are 3 ways to do this.

  • Move your top hand up first, then the lower one below it.
  • Lift the bottom hand out of the crack and hand jam above your upper hand.
  • Use the above 2 techniques together.

26 Shuffling, Basic Crack Climbing Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan

Do the same with your feet.

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Bouldering for Beginners Conclusion

In this rock climbing beginners guide are all the basic bouldering skills you need. 

Remember to always keep in mind the basic climbing principles while using the hand and foot techniques. 

You now also know more advanced rock climbing techniques such as overhangs and crack climbing.

Please remember that safety is paramount. You don’t need fancy equipment when outdoor bouldering, but a crash mat, a friend, and a cell phone is advisable. 

Never climb higher than you can safely fall when bouldering. And if you start climbing higher with ropes, take a professional course or hire a guide.

Also, be sure to take care in the weather. Have enough food, water, and clothing to keep you healthy whilst enjoying your amazing rock climbing experience.

Did you find this rock climbing training for beginners useful? If so, please share it with your friends.

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Sea Survival Skills https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/how-to-survive-at-sea/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/how-to-survive-at-sea/#respond Fri, 20 Jul 2018 13:50:30 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=13037 Knowing a few sea survival techniques is worth the effort. The ocean is, after all, one of the harshest environments to survive in. And for anyone that travels international, having to survive at sea is not so far fetched. 70% of the world is the ocean! That means if your plane goes down, chances are […]

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Knowing a few sea survival techniques is worth the effort. The ocean is, after all, one of the harshest environments to survive in. And for anyone that travels international, having to survive at sea is not so far fetched.

70% of the world is the ocean! That means if your plane goes down, chances are that it will be over water. And if you like cruises, fishing, diving, or any other ocean activity, well.. you get the picture.

In this article, we will go through the sea safety and survival skills you need to have the best chance.

Contents

  • Surviving the Cause
    • How to Survive a Sinking Ship
    • How to Survive a Plane Crash in Ocean
  • How to Stay Afloat in Deep Water
    • In a Liferaft
    • How to Fix a Leak in a Liferaft
    • Without a Life Raft
  • Planning for Survival at Sea and The Will to Live
  • Attracting Rescue at Sea
  • Signs of Land when Lost at Sea
  • Survival Navigation at Sea
    • How to Find North Using the Sun
    • Navigating with the Stars
    • Finding Direction with the Moon
    • How to Make a Compass
  • Movement at Sea
    • Using the Current
    • Using the Wind
    • How to Swim Long Distance with Survival Backstroke
  • Creating Shelter
  • How to Drink Sea Water to Survive
  • Catching Food at Sea
  • How to Fight a Shark
  • Embarking on Land
    • Swimming to Shore
  • Conclusion

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Sea Survival Techniques

Survival in Sea – Surviving the Cause

Before you can start surviving at sea, you will have to survive what put you there in the first place.

Two major reasons for this will be if your boat is sinking or your plane crashes.

Chances of surviving a passenger plane crashing in the ocean are slim, but not impossible. Getting off a sinking boat is easy in comparison, so let’s cover that one first.

How to Survive a Sinking Ship

When you suspect you may need to survive a sinking boat, take the following steps:

  • Put on warm clothing. Wool is best.
  • Cover as much of your body as you can and put on a life jacket.
  • Gather whatever survival provisions you can and get to a lifeboat.

Note: Do not exceed the maximum passengers in a life vessel. Have the healthy hang off the side and swap often.

If you need to jump off the boat, throw something that floats in first and then jump close to it. Once you are in the ocean, inflate your life jacket.

Once in the ocean, get away from the sinking vessel, upwind if you can. If you are too close to it, it is likely to drag you under.

How to Survive a Plane Crash in Ocean

If your plane is crashing into the sea (or anywhere), the same initial steps apply. Put on warm clothes and a life jacket. Gathering provisions will be harder but do it if you can.

To be honest, there isn’t much you can do in a plane crash except to follow the pilot’s/crew’s instructions. If the pilot is down you may need to land the plane yourself. Get to the controls and radio for help.

Using the Radio to Call for Help

  • Put on the headset if there is one.
  • Check the steering wheel or instrument panel for the talk button.
  • Press the button and use the international distress call of “Mayday! Mayday!”
  • Give your situation, destination, and plane call numbers. These should be on the top of the instrument panel.
  • Let go of the talk button and listen for a response.
  • If there is no response, try again.
  • Try three to five times waiting ten seconds between each time for a response.
  • If there is still no response tune the radio to 121.5 and try again. 121.5 is the international emergency channel.

Once you have made contact with someone, follow their instructions to land.

If you cannot contact anyone, you’ll have to try land the plane unguided. The first thing you will want to do is make sure you are flying straight.

Like cars, every model of plane is different, but they will all have the same basic functions.

Sea Survival Techniques, How to Survive a Plane Crash, Survival Fitness Plan

Yolk

  • The Yolk is the steering wheel.
  • It has the same effect as if in a car but is much more sensitive.
  • It also allows you to control pitch.
  • Pull back to pull up and push forward to dive.
  • To fly steady you want to keep the nose about 8cm below the horizon and the wings even.

Altimeter

  • This is the red dial on the instrument panel.
  • It indicates your altitude.
  • The small hand shows your height above sea level in thousand foot increments.
  • The large hand shows the same in hundreds.

Compass

  • The instrument with a small plane on it.
  • The nose of the plane is the direction you are going.

Speedometer

  • Usually in knots.
  • 120 knots is cruising speed.
  • Below 70 knots and you may stall.

Throttle

  • Controls thrust.
  • Pull it towards you to slow the plane and descend.
  • Push it away to speed the plane up and ascend.

Fuel Gauge

  • Usually on the lower part of the panel.

Landing Gear

  • If the plane has a retractable landing gear there will be another leaver between the seats. Most likely near the throttle.
  • It looks like a tire.
  • Some planes have a fixed landing gear so there will not be this leaver.

Ground Pedals

  • Use these pedals when on the ground.
  • The upper ones are the brakes.
  • The lower ones control the direction of the nose wheel.
  • The right pedal will move the plane right.
  • The left one will move the plane left.

How to Land a Plane in an Emergency

  • Slow down to about 90 knots by pulling back on the throttle.
  • Let the nose drop to about 11cm below the horizon.
  • Deploy the landing gear (if applicable) unless landing on water.
  • Find the longest and smoothest place to land that you can.
  • If you have enough fuel, fly over to look for obstructions, then circle back to land. Give yourself a wide birth.
  • Line up the landing strip so that it is just off the right-wing tip at one thousand feet.
  • As you approach to land pull back on the throttle.
  • Do not let the nose drop more than 15cm below the horizon.
  • The rear wheels should touch first at about 60 knots (stall speed).
  • Pull all the way back on the throttle ensuring the nose doesn’t dip too steep.
  • Gently pull back on the yolk as the plane touches the ground.
  • Use the pedals on the floor to steer and brake.
  • If you are going into an obstruction (e.g., trees) let the wings take the impact.
  • Once you have stopped get everyone out as soon as possible.

Assuming you have landed in the ocean and are still alive, get out of the plane. You do not want to sink with it.

Swim upwind from it so you do not get dragged under by its pull.

Also, whether you are abandoning ship or surviving a plane crash:

  • If there is a chance of underwater explosion swim on your back.
  • Swim under any danger, e.g., fire.

Instruction for how to swim on your back using the survival backstroke is later in this article.

How to Stay Afloat in Deep Water

Once off and away from the sinking vessel, you need to know how to survive adrift at sea.

How to Survive at Sea in a Liferaft

Whether your liferaft is inflatable or a hard boat, there are things you must do to ensure surviving a disaster lost at sea.

  • Secure all passengers and equipment to it
  • Do not jump into it
  • Check for leaks daily
  • Waterproof everything that requires it

In addition to the above, if in an inflatable liferaft:

  • Wait until you are clear of the wreck before inflating it unless you can board it and stay dry
  • Inflate the liferaft so it is firm, but not too hard. Compensate for the surrounding temperature (heat makes air expand)
  • Check inflation daily
  • Make sure nothing can puncture it

To board a liferaft from the water

  • Move to one end (not the side)
  • Put one leg over the edge and roll inside

If the liferaft has a line attached

  • Grab the line from the opposite side of where it is attached
  • Brace your feet against the liferaft and pull yourself in
  • Expect the other end of the liferaft to come up
  • You can adjust this technique to right an overturned liferaft

To help someone else on board

  • Hold them by their shoulders
  • Have them lift one leg over the end of the raft (if possible)
  • Roll them in

How to Fix a Leak in a Liferaft

If you are in a hard life raft (not inflatable) you are more likely to get a leak on impact with the water.

When you see little bubbles in an inflatable liferaft, it is a sign of leaks.

In either case, place plastic it across the leak on the outside of the boat. Water pressure will help to hold it on place, but also try to seal it with duct tape, glue, etc.

Duct tape can repair small cracks also.

How to Survive in the Sea Without a Life Raft

When you don’t have a liferaft, your first priority is to get one! If there is one nearby, attract attention using noise and light.

When there is no liferaft, build one with whatever you can, e.g., wreckage from your crash.

How to Improvise a Flotation Device with a Pair of Trousers
When there is no other option, you can use your clothing to stay afloat.

To do it with your trousers:

  • Knot the bottoms of the legs
  • Hold the trousers behind your head by the waistband

How to Survive When Abandoning Ship - Disaster Survival - Survival Fitness Plan Urban and Wilderness Survival Training 1

  • Bring them over your head in front of you in a sharp motion to fill them with air.
  • Hold the waist below water to trap the air.
  • If you need more air, go underwater and breathe into the pants.

Sea Survival Techniques - Disaster Survival - Survival Fitness Plan Urban and Wilderness Survival Training 2

Planning for Survival at Sea and The Will to Live

Ok, so you have survived the initial crash and are floating in the ocean.

Now what?

Now you need to survive until rescue arrives. But it may take a while.

For most people, there will be times that you feel like giving up. The moment you give up is the moment you die. You must keep your will to live.

Never give up!

I know that is much easier to say from behind my computer than it is from the middle of the ocean, but it is still true.

The longest survival at sea so far is 484 days!

Reference: Guinness Book of World Records

The will to live is very important and applies to ALL survival situations. You must keep a strong will to live and have faith that you will live. Different things motivate different people. Common ones are family and god.

Of course, having blind faith is not enough. Having the will to live also means being proactive in your survival. Always be vigilant for things that will help you, as well as pre-empting problems. If you are in a group, assign lookouts on short shifts. Look out for signs of life, land, rescue, leaks, and anything that could be useful.

How to Survive in Sea – Attracting Rescue at Sea

From the very first moment you become stranded at sea, you must be on the lookout for rescue. It is your best chance of survival, and the sooner you get it, the better.

Your liferaft may have some signaling devices. There are various types of flares. Follow the instructions on them. Check out some signal flares here.

If you have nothing else, improvise. A mirror is an effective signaling tool. Use it to reflect the sun towards a possible rescue ship or plane. In fact, you can use any screen, e.g., your smartphone.

Most life jackets will have a whistle and lights. You can also use these to maintain contact with other survivors in other liferafts. View the best lifejackets on the market.

If there is no land in sight, or you are near shipping lanes, wait at the crash site for at least 72 hours. You can keep your position by making a sea anchor. Tie weighted objects to a line.

Sea Survival Techniques - Survival Fitness Plan Urban and Wilderness Survival Training 1

Keep your position by making a sea anchor.

How to Survive Lost at Sea – Signs of Land when Lost at Sea

Besides a fast rescue, your best chance of surviving at sea is to find land. So if you see it, or know where it is, head for it.

Signs of land include:

  • A constant wind with a decreasing swell. Land is wind-ward.
  • A green tint on the underside of clouds.
  • Isolated cumulus clouds.
  • Muddy water indicates silt from a large river mouth.
  • Lighter colored water indicates shallow water.
  • Seabirds fly away from land before noon and return to it in the afternoon.
  • Odors and sounds of land including smoke, vegetation, surf, animals, etc.

Sea Survival Techniques - Survival Fitness Plan Urban and Wilderness Survival Training 2

Survival Navigation at Sea

Maybe you can not spot land, but you know where it is. Great! You need to navigate there.

In this section, you will learn how to survive being lost at sea using survival navigation.

With today’s technology, there are easy ways to navigate, such as GPS. But batteries run out, and salt water is never good for electronics. Still, a good marine GPS can’t be beaten. Check here to see the best in today’s market.

Knowledge of map and compass navigation is an excellent skill to have for life in general. You can learn more about that here. A reliable compass is essential. My favorites are by Silva. Get yours here.

The navigation I want to look at in this article is survival navigation for the sea. That is, when you do not have a GPS or even a compass.

How to Find North Using the Sun

Here are some basics of sun navigation:

  • The sun rises in the east and sets in the west.
  • In the northern hemisphere the sun is due south at midday. In the southern hemisphere it is due north.

Now for something a little more accurate, how to tell direction with a watch.

For this method you need an analog watch. I’ll explain how to do it with a digital watch after I’ve explained how to do it normally.

Hold your wristwatch in front of you like a compass, and line a small twig or something similar along the edge of it. Your aim is to cast a shadow toward the center of the watch.

Now turn the watch until the shadow splits in half the distance between the hour hand and 12 on the watch face. In the Northern hemisphere, 6 is pointing north. In the Southern hemisphere it is opposite, i.e., 12 points north.

If you do not have a twig you can still do this, but it won’t be as accurate. In the Northern Hemisphere, point the hour hand towards the sun. The center of the angle between the hour hand and twelve o’clock mark is the north-south line.

In the Southern Hemisphere, point the 12 mark towards the sun instead.

If you only have a digital watch you can still use it in the same way. You have to estimate where the hour hand will be. Use 12, 3, 6, and 9 o-clock angles to guide you to the other hours, and smaller increments for half/quarter hours.

Note: Your watch must be set to the time zone you are in. So if you were flying internationally and have no idea where you are, this may be a problem. Also, make sure your watch isn’t set to daylight savings.

Navigating with the Stars

Navigating by the stars is more accurate than doing it by the sun.

Finding the North Star Polaris
By locating the North Star, you can draw an imaginary line from it to a landmark back on earth. With this, you can steer north.

Finding a landmark in the open sea is difficult, but do your best. You can even use another star lower to the horizon.

The North Star is NOT the brightest star in the sky. The reason it is good for navigation is because it does not move. To help you find the North Star you can use two other constellations. The Big Dipper and Cassiopeia. Cassiopeia is like an upside down “W”.

Follow the ‘ladle’ of the big dipper up about 5x its length. This is about halfway to Cassiopeia. The bright star you see in this area is the North Star.

Navigating with the North Star, Sea Survival Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan

By United States Army [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Navigating by the Southern Cross
In the Southern Hemisphere, you can use the Southern Cross to find South. The Southern Cross constellation is 5 stars, and the 4 brightest stars make a cross that is angled to one side.

Imagine a line 5 times the distance between the two stars that make up the long axis of the cross. Now imagine a line from this point to a landmark on “the ground”.

This gives true south. True north will be behind you as you are looking at the point.

Navigating with the Southern Cross, Sea Survival Techniques

By United States Army [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Finding Direction with the Moon

This is not very accurate but is simple to use and easy to remember.

If it is before midnight, the illuminated side of the moon faces west. If it is after midnight, the illuminated side faces east.

How to Make a Compass

To make an improvised compass you need to magnetize metal. A sewing needle is in most survival kits and is perfect for the job. Anything similar will also work.

There are 2 basic ways to magnetize metal:

  1. Rub it with a magnet, always in the same direction. Speakers have magnets at the back of them which you can use, but do not break your radio!
  2. Place it in a coil with a direct current in it.

You can magnetize iron, nickel, and steel. That means aluminum soda cans won’t work.

Hang the magnetized needle on a string or float it in the water on top of anything that is not metal.

How to Survive Stranded at Sea – Movement at Sea

Once you know where land is, you have to get to it. You can paddle, but that uses a lot of energy. It is better to save your strength until actually shoring.

So unless you have a motor, you will need to use either the current or the wind.

Using the Current

The current is more useful when approaching land, but you can use it in open sea also. To use the current, deflate your raft a little so it rides low in the water. Also, keep yourselves low in the raft. Deploying your sea anchor if you have one will also help.

Using the Wind

To use the wind, you will need to improvise a sail. If you do, prevent capsizing by holding the bottom of it with your hands. This way you can release it if there is a sudden gust of wind.

Using the wind is opposite to using the current. You want to ride high, not low. Inflate the raft, sit up, and pull in your sea anchor.

How to Survive a Storm at Sea
To prevent capsizing in rough waters you should keep low. Stream your sea anchor from the bow (front). If there is more than one liferaft in your groups, tying them together will improve stability.

How to Swim Long Distance with Survival Backstroke

When you need to swim long distance and/or stay afloat in the water for a really long time, do survival backstroke.

Survival backstroke is floating on your back as you propel through the water. You use a simultaneous frog/breaststroke kick and a sculling motion with your hands. Your arms and legs move and come together at the same time.

The main goal of the survival backstroke is to conserve energy and reduce heat loss.

To maximize energy conservation, do the survival backstroke very slow. Take short strokes and glide for as long as possible. Only take the next stroke when you feel your legs dropping or you loose forward momentum.

Sea Survival Techniques, How to do Survival Backstroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

Short strokes minimize heat loss from under your armpits and between your legs. Your arms should not extend beyond your shoulders. Also, at the end of each stroke, bring your arms and legs together. Hold them close but comfortable against your body.

Sea Survival Techniques, How to do Survival Backstroke, Survival Fitness Plan

Also use the survival backstroke is if an underwater explosion is likely. You will want to go faster so you can escape the blast, so make your strokes larger. Take your next stroke sooner than normal, but not too soon. Make the most out of your streamlined glide position while achieving the most speed.

Sea Survival Techniques, How to do Survival Backstroke, Survival Fitness Plan

How to Survive Being Stranded at Sea – Creating Shelter

Finding shelter when stranded out in sea is harder than on land, but not impossible. You can use any clothing or tarpaulin to shelter you from the cold and sun. If you have some poles you can even construct a roof.

How to Drink Sea Water to Survive

IMPORTANT: Ration any food and water you have in supplies from the start. Even if you are expecting rescue, anything can happen.

Also, always try to live off the sea before using your rations.

Learning how to survive at sea without water means learning how to find water!

First of all, never drink sea water. It will lead to faster dehydration. Instead, you need to catch and store rainwater whenever you can. Any plastic will do the trick. A tarpaulin, sails, the raft itself, etc.

Although not as effective, fabric will also work. It will absorb water which you can wring out into containers.

The first rainwater you catch will wash the salt off whatever you are catching it with, so don’t drink that. It is still useful to clean wounds and wash food.

If you are at sea for a while, fabrics will have salt crystals, so wash them out with sea water first. Seawater is salty, but salt crystals are worse!

Catching Food at Sea

If you don’t get rescued or find land within a day, you will want to find food. Fishing is the obvious answer, but you can also eat seabirds, planktons, seaweed, etc.

Small fish will gather underneath your raft. A simple handline, hook, and lure will do the trick. Even a simple survival kit will have a small fishing kit in it. Get yourself a survival kit!

If you don’t have fishing line, any string can work. Shoelaces, paracord, etc. If you do have fishing line, be careful not to cut yourself. Anything flashy makes a good lure. Be very careful with the hook or anything sharp if in an inflatable liferaft.

When you do catch a fish, use its guts as bait.

Do not hang around after spilling blood in the ocean. It may attract sharks.

How to Fight a Shark

The vast majority of shark attacks on humans are mistaken identity. Humans don’t taste good to sharks! Still, they are the king of the ocean, so you want to stay out of their way.

Like most animals, food is what will attract a shark, whether it is real or mistaken identity. Blood and fish are the biggest attractions. So is anything that resembles these, like shiny objects or human waste.

Whether you are in a life raft or not, if you spot a shark, be loud and slap the water.

If you don’t have a liferaft and are in a group, bunch together and face out. Everyone should shout underwater and slap the surface.

When a shark starts circling you, it is a sign of attack. When it comes at you, strike at its gills, eyes, and nose.

What to do When Lost at Sea – Embarking on Land

Once you find land you must first choose a good landing point. This is much easier to do in daylight. It is better to land on the downwind side of an island. Also, select somewhere that will be easy to beach or swim ashore.

As you approach the shore, note the landscape. Look for high ground, vegetation, water courses, etc. It is easier to see these things from a distance so make the most of it. If you are in a group, choose a meeting point in case of separation. Also, secure all your gear to your body and have a floatation aid ready.

As you come in to beach, do the following:

  • Stay in the raft for as long as possible
  • Take down the sail
  • Deflate the raft a little so it rides low in the water
  • Keep low in the raft
  • Put a sea anchor out to keep you pointing at the shore, unless you are going through coral
  • Head for gaps in the surf. Waves usually occur in sets of 7, from small to large
  • Steer clear of rocks, ice, and other obstacles
  • If possible, keep the sun out of your eyes
  • Attempt to use the waves to carry you into shore
  • Paddle hard

In Heavy Surf

  • Point towards the sea
  • Paddle into approaching waves

Once you are past the wave breaks you want to avoid getting swept back out to sea. Make the liferaft as light as possible and take out the sea anchor.

If the under-current is taking you back out, partly fill the raft with water and stream the anchor towards the shore.

Swimming to Shore

When swimming to shore without a raft, face the shore and sit with your feet about a meter below your head. This way, you can take any impact with your feet.

When the waves are big, swim to shore in the troughs between them.

If a wave going out to sea approaches, go under it.

Finally, if you get caught in the undertow, don’t try to swim against it. Instead, swim parallel to the shore until you can swim in.

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Conclusion

Sea safety & survival is an important subject to learn about. If you survive the accident, ration any supplies you may have and stick around the site for rescue. If nothing comes after a few days, and/or you know where land is, head for it.

While navigating the seas you will need all the things of any survival situation. Shelter, food, and water. Try to live off the sea as much as possible before using your rations. Never drink sea water and keep an eye out for anything useful. This includes rescue, raft leaks, sharks, land, etc.

Finally, remember to never give up. The longest person to survive at sea did so for 484 days, and the 2nd longest was 438 days.

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Poisonous Snake Bite First Aid Procedures https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/poisonous-snake-bite-first-aid-procedures/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/poisonous-snake-bite-first-aid-procedures/#respond Fri, 20 Jul 2018 11:05:47 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=12946 In this article, you will learn poisonous snake bite first aid procedures. It covers snake bite symptoms and snake bite treatment. This is life-saving information if you live in or visit a country with poisonous snakes. It also talks about dog snake bite symptoms and treatment, and snake bite on cats. Finally, it gives specific […]

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In this article, you will learn poisonous snake bite first aid procedures. It covers snake bite symptoms and snake bite treatment. This is life-saving information if you live in or visit a country with poisonous snakes.

It also talks about dog snake bite symptoms and treatment, and snake bite on cats. Finally, it gives specific information on some of the most poisonous snakes in the world.

Contents

  • Prevention of Snake Bites
    • Snake Bite Protection
  • Poisonous Snake Bite Symptoms
  • Snake Bite Treatment
    • Pressure Immobilization Technique
    • Non-Poisonous Snake Bites
  • Snake Bite on Dogs and Cats
    • Snake Bite Dog Symptoms
    • Cat and Dog Snake Bite Treatment
  • Specific Snake Bite Information
    • Black Mamba
    • Blue Krait
    • Copperhead
    • Coral Snake
    • Death Adder
    • Eastern Brown Snake
    • Philippines Cobra
    • Rattlesnake
    • Sea Snake (Cottonmouth)
    • Taipan
    • Tiger Snake
    • Viper Snake Bite First Aid
  • Conclusion

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Poisonous Snake Bite First Aid Procedures

Prevention of Snake Bites

Prevention is always the best cure, and most poisonous snake bites are easy to avoid.

As with any animal, stay away from them. Most will run away before you know they are there anyway. If you do come across one, stand still and back away. Give it plenty of room to escape. Do not tease or try to move it. That is asking for trouble.

Although each snake likes slightly different conditions, most like to hide. Watch out in tall grass, piles of wood or rocks, piles of leaves, etc.

Snakes are cold-blooded so need to warm in the sun. Be extra careful when hiking on a sunny but cool day. This is when snakes are most likely to be sunbathing in the open.

Snake Bite Protection

If working in snake territory, wear protective clothing. Long pants, tall boots, and leather gloves are good.

You can even get special snake bite proof pants and snake bite proof boots. Get your snake bite proof clothing here.

Poisonous Snake Bite Symptoms

Different snakes can present different symptoms. In general, you will get some or all the following:

  • 2 puncture marks
  • Blurred vision
  • Breathing difficulty, sometimes extreme
  • Local swelling and redness
  • Local pain, often severe
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Salivation
  • Sweating

*Local refers to being near/around the bite site.

Snake Bite Treatment

As with all life-threatening first aid situations, follow DRABC. Read a detailed article about DRABC here.

Besides DRABC, specific first aid treatment for snake bites is as follows:

  • Record the time of bite
  • *Identify the snake if possible
  • Keep the victim calm and and as still as possible
  • Remove constricting clothing and jewelry
  • Administer antivenin if available
  • Get to a hospital ASAP

*Only do this if it is safe. Don’t try to hunt it down. Take a picture from a safe distance if possible.

DO NOT:

  • Apply a cold compress
  • Apply a tourniquet
  • Cut the snake bite
  • Give medication (unless directed by a medical professional)
  • Pump or suck the venom out
  • Raise the bite

If you live or work close to poisonous snakes it is wise to have a snake bite first aid kit. Ensure you have snake bite antivenin for the snakes you are most likely to come in contact with.

Pressure Immobilization Technique

The pressure immobilization technique is not only for treating snake bites. Use can use it for most venomous bites and stings. The idea is to slow the venom’s movement into the circulatory system. This buys time until the arrival of advanced medical care.

When applying the pressure immobilization technique, keep the patient as still as possible. Especially the site of the venomous snake bite. Do not elevate the wound.

In general, only apply the pressure immobilization technique for:

  • Australian snakes, all species
  • Blue-ringed octopus
  • Conus
  • Funnel-web spiders
  • If possible, use an elastic roller bandage
  • Bandage upwards from the lower part of the bitten or stung limb, and continue up as high as possible. Each wrap should overlap the last.
  • Ensure the bandage does not impair perfusion (blood flow)
  • Mark the location of the bite on the bandage
  • Immobilize the limb
  • Check perfusion often as continued swelling may impair it

Applying the Pressure Immobilization Technique 1 - Survival Fitness Plan Remote Area First Aid Training

Note: Do not bandage bites/stings to the head or torso. Keep patient still and seek medical care ASAP.

Non-Poisonous Snake Bites

This article focuses on poisonous snake bites, but I want to touch on non-poisonous snake bites too.

The physical symptoms will be the same:

  • 2 puncture wounds
  • Local swelling and redness
  • Local pain

You will not normally get the other symptoms (vomiting, blurred vision, etc).

Treat a non-venomous snake wound as a puncture wound. If you have any doubt, treat the snake bite as venomous!

The basic steps for treating a non-venomous snake wound are:

  • Apply direct pressure to stop the bleeding
  • Clean the wound with mild soap and clean water
  • Apply a topical antiseptic such as Povidone Iodine
  • Cover the wound with a sterile bandage
  • See a doctor for follow-up asap. You may need antibiotics.

Snake Bite on Dogs and Cats

Dogs and cats may try to play with or kill snakes. This often results in them getting bit.

Snake Bite Dog Symptoms

Symptoms of a snake bite in dogs are like those on humans, but the onset will be faster since they are smaller. In general, the smaller the dog, the less chance of survival it will have. Following this logic, a cat snake bite is even more lethal.

Look for the following symptoms:

  • Blood in urine
  • Collapse
  • Dilated pupils
  • Loss of bladder and bowel control
  • Muscle spasm
  • Paralysis
  • Sudden weakness
  • Vomiting

Cat and Dog Snake Bite Treatment

The treatment for snake bites on animals is the same as for humans. The only difference is to go to a vet instead of a hospital.

Carry your pet wherever it needs to go and get antivenin as quickly as possible.

If possible, you can use the pressure immobilization technique, e.g., for a snake bite on dog leg.

Whether it is a rattlesnake bite on a dog or some other species, the main thing is to keep the animal still. Get to a vet and give it some snake bite antivenom ASAP.

Specific Snake Bite Information

There are many types of snakes around the world. Here we will go over some of the most poisonous ones.

The general treatment is the same for all poisonous snakes. The difference is the type of antivenin. This is why it is important to identify the type of snake bite. Study the pictures.

Note: If someone gets bitten and did not identify the type of snake, do not bother trying to find out. Get to a hospital. They have tests to discover the type of venom.

Black Mamba Bite First Aid

This fast striking snake is in many parts of Africa. Unlike other Mamba species, the Black Mamba is not primarily a tree dweller. Except in the jungle, it prefers rocky crevices, scrub, abandoned burrows, etc.

It is not as aggressive as most people are lead to believe, but I would definitely not mess with it.

Black Mamba bite symptoms include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Confusion
  • Convulsions
  • Distorted vision
  • Fever
  • Lack of muscle control
  • Local pain
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Pallor
  • Paralysis
  • Respiratory failure
  • Salivation and foaming of the mouth
  • Shock
  • Tingling in extremities
  • Tingling in mouth
1 Black Mamba Bite First Aid, Poisonous Snake Bite First Aid Procedures, Survival Fitness Plan

Danleo~commonswiki assumed (based on copyright claims). [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY 2.5 ], via Wikimedia Commons

Blue Krait Bite First Aid

This nocturnal snake is from South East Asia. They are timid most of the time but are highly venomous. They like to hang around water and can grow up to 1m long.

Blue Krait bite symptoms include:

  • Cramps
  • Muscle paralysis
  • Paralysis
  • Spasms
  • Tremors

Copperhead Bite First Aid

Copperheads are not aggressive, but if you step on one it will react. They are common in the Eastern states of North America. You will find them among rocks, in the woods, or near water sources.

There are also Copperheads in Australia, but they are a different species.

Copperhead bite symptoms include:

  • Change in skin color
  • Low blood pressure
  • Pain
  • Shock
  • Weakness

Coral Snake Bite First Aid

Coral snakes are common in the south of the US. They like to hide in leaf piles, so don’t step or kick one while you are walking!

The symptoms of Coral Snake bites are often delayed by hours.

Coral Snake bite symptoms include:

  • Change in skin color
  • Convulsions
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Drooping eyelids
  • Headache
  • Pain
  • Paralysis
  • Shock
  • Stomach pain

Death Adder Bite First Aid

The Death Adder is in Australia and New Guinea. It likes to hide among loose leaf litter and debris and is quite hard to see, especially if not keeping an eye out for one.

Deathadder bite symptoms include:

  • Drooping eyelids
  • Muscle weakness
  • Nausea
  • Paralysis
  • Respiratory failure
  • Speech impairment

Eastern Brown Snake Bite First Aid

This venomous snake makes its home in the major population centers of Australia. It is fast and may chase you. Luckily, less than half their bites contain venom, and they only react to movement. If you encounter one, stand very still.

Eastern Brown Snake bite symptoms include:

  • Cardiac arrest
  • Collapse
  • Convulsions
  • Diarrhea
  • Dizziness
  • Paralysis
  • Renal failure
6 Eastern Brown Snake Bite First Aid, Poisonous Snake Bite First Aid Procedures, Survival Fitness Plan

By Poyt448 Peter Woodard [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons

Philippines Cobra Bite First Aid

This snake has the most poisonous venom of all the cobra’s, and it can spit up to 3 meters. It lives almost anywhere, especially near water.

Philippines Cobra bite symptoms include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Cardiac failure
  • Convulsions
  • Diarrhea
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Respiratory failure
  • Vomiting

Rattlesnake Bite First Aid

Rattlesnakes are one of the most common poisonous snakes in North America. They are also the largest of the poisonous snakes. They like to sunbathe so watch for them on top of rocks, logs, and in open areas.

If you hear the rattle of a rattlesnake, back away. It is your warning!

Rattlesnake bite symptoms include:

  • Drooping eyelids
  • Muscle fatigue
  • Low blood pressure
  • Severe pain
  • Thirst
  • Tiredness

Sea Snake Bite First Aid

Can a snake bite in water? Yes, it can. And all sea/water snakes are very poisonous. In fact, some think the most venomous snake in the world is the Belcher’s Sea Snake from SE Asia and Northern Australia.

The water moccasin is a common water-snake in the southeastern states of the US. They are commonly called a Cottonmouth snake.

Cottonmouth bite symptoms include:

  • Change in skin color
  • Low blood pressure
  • Pain
  • Shock
  • Weakness

Taipan Bite First Aid

There are 3 sub-species of Taipan, all found in Australia. The Coastal Taipan is like the Australian version of the Black Mamba. It has similar aggressive behavior and toxicity.

The Inland Taipan is more venomous but not as aggressive as its coastal relative. This competes with the Belcher’s Sea Snake as most venomous snake in the world.

The 3rd is the Central Ranges Taipan which was only discovered in 2007.

Inland Taipan bite symptoms include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Collapse
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Paralysis
  • Vomiting

Tiger Snake Bite First Aid

Tiger Snakes are common near water in Australia. They will often run from loud noises but will attack if cornered.

Tiger Snake bite symptoms include:

  • Foot pain
  • Neck pain
  • Tingling
  • Numbness
  • Sweating
  • Reparatory failure
  • Paralysis

Viper Snake Bite First Aid

Vipers are all over the world, but the most poisonous ones are in Asia. They are most active at night and after rain. They anger easily which make them especially dangerous.

Viper bite symptoms include:

  • Bleeding from the gums
  • Delayed cardiac failure
  • Delayed respiratory failure
  • Facial swelling
  • Local blistering
  • Local pain
  • Local swelling
  • Low blood pressure
  • Necrosis
  • Vomiting
Pit Viper Bite First Aid, Poisonous Snake Bite First Aid Procedures, Survival Fitness Plan

Green Pit Viper. Via Maxpixel.com.

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Conclusion

There are many venomous snakes in the world and most people will come across one every now and again. If you do, remember to stay still and back away slowly. Give it plenty of room to escape and it will have no reason to attack you.

General first aid for snake bites is not complicated. Keep the victim still and get them some snake bite antivenin ASAP. For Australian snake bites, use the pressure immobilization technique.

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