Survival Fitness Plan https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com Train to Survive Any Situation Sat, 22 Sep 2018 17:38:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/outdoor-bouldering-for-beginners/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/outdoor-bouldering-for-beginners/#respond Fri, 21 Sep 2018 06:44:20 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=12852 In this guide to outdoor bouldering for beginners you will learn all the beginners rock climbing techniques you need to have fun and stay safe.  Contents Bouldering Vs Climbing The Benefits of Rock Climbing Rock Climbing Fundamentals Rock Climbing Grips Technique Rock Climbing Foot Techniques Tips for the Different Types of Climbing Faces Basic Crack Climbing
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In this guide to outdoor bouldering for beginners you will learn all the beginners rock climbing techniques you need to have fun and stay safe. 

Contents

  • Bouldering Vs Climbing
  • The Benefits of Rock Climbing
  • Rock Climbing Fundamentals
  • Rock Climbing Grips Technique
  • Rock Climbing Foot Techniques
  • Tips for the Different Types of Climbing Faces
  • Basic Crack Climbing Techniques
  • Bouldering for Beginners Conclusion

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Bouldering Vs Climbing

Bouldering is rock climbing without special equipment such as ropes and harnesses. And you don’t climb high. No higher than is safe to fall.

Often people bouldering will still use climbing shoes and chalk. These things make bouldering easier but are not 100% necessary. 

For safety I recommend using a crash mat to pad your fall. Check out some crash mats here.

In this article, I use the terms bouldering and rock climbing interchangeably. 

Bouldering and rock climbing techniques are the same as far as rock climbing for beginners goes. 

Rock climbing with ropes requires technical knowledge to use the equipment safely. 

This article on rock climbing focuses on bouldering technique for beginners. You don‘t need any special climbing equipment.

The Benefits of Rock Climbing

There a many rock climbing benefits. Here are a few off the top of my head:

  • A bouldering workout plan. Using bouldering for fitness is a fun way to keep in shape. If you want to get toned up, a bouldering workout routine will get you there faster than most other sports, and it’s more interesting than hitting the gym.
  • Make friends. You may think of climbing as a solo-sport, but it really isn’t. Although you can do it alone, I recommended having at least one person to do it with. Apart from that, climbing communities are close-knit in most cities. Everyone has the same passion and a similar mindset.
  • See the world in a new light. When beginning rock climbing, you will see things from a different perspective. Rocks, trees, buildings, and anything else that you might climb.
  • Get outdoors. Although there are plenty of indoor climbing gyms for those rainy days, outdoor bouldering will get you into nature. Going outside is also cheap rock climbing since you don’t have to pay gym fees. And there are no “gym rules” you need to stick by. You could try out barefoot rock climbing.
  • Improve your mind. Climbing isn’t only muscle and technique. A lot of your success depends on choosing a strategic route. There will also be times when you will want to give up from sore muscles. Mind of matter will get you through.
  • A useful “flight” skill. This is the main reason I outline the basics of rock climbing on this website. Knowing how to climb may save your life one day.

Rock Climbing Fundamentals

When beginning rock climbing you need to start with the basic principles. 

In fact, if the only things you learn from this climbing article are these bouldering fundamentals, you will be a better climber than most people on the planet. 

The rock climbing term “holds” refers to what you place your feet and hands onto to climb. They are what you ‘hold’ onto.

Climb With Your Legs

As far as rock climbing basics go, you can’t get more fundamental than to climb with your legs. 

Your legs do the climbing, not your arms. Though you often need a little pull-up, your arms are primarily for keeping balance. 

To conserve energy, move your feet up the wall first and use your leg muscles to push you up. Once balanced, rest your weight over your legs. 

Don’t use your arms to hold you up. This will tire your out too fast.

Here are more leg-related beginner rock climbing tips:

  • Step light and place your foot carefully and firmly. Don’t ‘stomp’ into the holds.
  • Use the edges of your feet or the ball of your big toe.
  • Press your foot downwards and into the wall.
  • Trust you can stand.

Plan Your Route

Plan your route before you climb and at least one move ahead whilst climbing. Know where you will place your foot of hand before taking it off the hold.

You can adjust your plan as needed while you are climbing.

Climb Smooth

Climbing smooth means to be fluid. Don’t pause between moves. Planning your route is essential for you to achieve this.

It doesn’t mean you can never stop. Look 3 or 4 moves ahead and plan where you think a good ‘rest point’ will be. Climb smooth until you get there and then rest and plan your next moves. 

Another part of climbing smooth is to breathe. Like with all physical activities, holding your breath will stifle your movement and also wear you out faster.

Gaining Reach

Reaching to grab holds will drain your energy. Though it is necessary sometimes, there are other ways to grain reach which you can try first.

  • Reach Backwards. Turn away from the hold and reach backwards for it. It is like reaching for something far under a bed.
  • Stand Up. Stand straight and keep your hips close to the wall with your weight over your feet. This is as opposed to leaning against the rock.
  • Bumping. Gain momentum off one hold to reach a better one.

The key takeaway from the above bouldering tips for beginners is to conserve your energy. 

Rock Climbing Grips Technique

In this section you will learn the different bouldering grips and which rock climbing holds to use them on.

To conserve energy, only grip a hold as hard as you need to. 

Edges

Edges are horizontal holds that have an edge you can grab onto. They can be flat or may have a lip wish you can pull on.

Crimp Grip
To grab an edge, use the crimp grip. This is where you grab the edge with your fingertips flat and your fingers arched above the tips.
 
Crimping too hard can cause tendon damage.

Full Crimp
The full crimp is when you place the pads of your fingertips on an edge and curl your fingers so that you flex the second joint.

Press your thumb on top of the index finger’s fingernail to secure the grip.

Full Crimp - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Half Crimp
If you let your thumb press against the side of your index finger, you are using the half crimp.

The half crimp is weaker but less damaging to your fingers. 

If you can, use the half crimp.

Half Crimp - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Slopers

Slopers are round handholds without an edge.

They are easiest to grab if they are above you.
 
When griping a sloper, use the open hand grip and keep your arms straight for leverage.

Slopers - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Open Hand Grip
The Open Hand Grip uses the friction against the rock surface.

Wrap your hand onto the hold with your fingers close together. Feel around with your fingers to find grip spots.

Also, feel around with your thumb to see if there is a bump you can press against.

Open Hand Grip - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Pinches

Pinches are holds which you can grip by pinching with your fingers on one side and your thumb on the other. 

If the pinch hold is small, use your thumb opposed to your index finger with your middle finger stacked on top. 

With larger pinch holds, oppose your thumb with all your fingers.

Pinches - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Side Pulls

Side pulls are holds you pull on sideways instead of straight down. You would do this depending on the orientation of the hold. 

You can pull outward on the side pull while pushing a foot in the opposite direction to keep you in place. 

Side Pulls - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Pockets

Pockets are holes in the rock surface which you can place one or more of your fingers in. Insert as many fingers as you can comfortably fit.

Use your strongest fingers first. Feel inside the pocket to find a surface you can pull against.

Pockets - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Gastons

A gaston is a vertical or diagonal hold, usually to your front.

Grab a gaston with your fingers and palm facing the rock and your thumb pointing downward.

Bend your elbow at a sharp angle and point it away from your body.

Crimp your fingers on the edge and pull outward.

Gastons - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Undercling

An undercling is any hold you have to grip on its underside. To do it correctly requires body tension and opposition.

Grip the rock with your palm facing up and your thumb pointing out.

Pull out on the undercling and push your feet against the wall.

Holds and Grips for Bouldering and Rock Climbing, Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing Training, Undercling

Palming

If no handhold exists, you can keep your hand in place by pushing into a dimple in the rock with the heel of your palm.

Palming - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Matching Hands

The matching hands rock climbing technique is when you you place your hands next to each other on the same hold so you can change hands.

Matching Hands - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

You can do a similar technique with your feet. Do so by slowly replacing the foot and without jumping.

You can also do it with a hand and foot.

Matching Hands 2 - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

While matching is important to know, try not to use it. 

It is better to reach for an extra hold over so your trailing hand can have its own hold.

Reaching will cause fatigue, but matching increases the chance of falling. Ideally you want to do neither of these rock climbing skills, but if you have no choice, reaching is better than matching.

Rock Climbing Foot Techniques

We covered hand climbing techniques for beginners. Now we will focus on the legs and feet.

Smearing

Smearing is like palming for the feet. 

Push the flat of your foot hard on the wall, using friction to hold you up. 

If you want to go up direct the force a little downward. 

Return to a foothold as soon as you can.

Smearing - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Back Stepping

Back stepping is one of the basic rock climbing techniques for gaining reach. 

Step on a hold so that the outside of your hip faces into the rock. You will have a longer reach in the same direction as the foot you back stepped. 

Drop one knee toward the ground with the other pointing up for an exaggerated back step.

Back Stepping - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Flagging

Use flagging to balance your body when reaching for a hold.

Cross one foot behind the other to avoid swinging out from the rock. 

Flagging - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Mantle

You can use the mantle to climb up onto a ledge that you are hanging off. This bouldering technique uses your hands and feet. 

Pull yourself up onto a ledge by rocking sideways. Turn your hand around and push yourself up until you can place a foot and stand up. 

Mantle - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

If you want to build strength for mantling, one of the best rock climbing exercises for beginners is the pull up.

Stemming

Stemming is a good rock climbing tips for beginners to climb opposing walls, or “chimneys”.

This is another of my climbing tips for beginners that uses your hands and feet. 

To do stemming, press one foot into one of the walls and your other foot against the other. Push out with an opposing force to hold your weight up. 

Do the same with your hands. 

Hold your weight with your arms/hands and shift both feet up.

Once you are stable on your feet, hold your weight with your legs and move your hands up. Repeat this ‘shuffling’ with your hands and feet to climb the chimney.

Stemming - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Hooking

Heel and toe hooks can aid in balance and provide leverage for movement. 

There are many ways to use the hook, e.g., with your foot to climb onto a ledge. 

Hooking - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners- Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

You can hook under a rock to keep stability whilst negotiating an overhang.

Foot Techniques for Bouldering and Rock Climbing, Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing Training

Tips for the Different Types of Climbing Faces

The final section of outdoor and indoor rock climbing for beginners is how to climb different types of faces.

Climbing Slabs

A slab is any rock face than is at an angle less than 90°. 

Slabs - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

To climb a slab, keep your weight centered on your feet. As you climb, be precise with your toe placement. 

Stand upright on the rock and away from the slab surface. 

Aim for big holds but don’t make big steps to get to them. It is better to make small steps on small footholds and then reach once you reach your big hold target. Plan 3 to 5 of your intended foot holds ahead at a time.

Look for variations in the surface and smear on tiny holds. You can also feel the hold with a finger to find the best spot for your foot placement.

Slabs - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Climbing Vertical Faces

Vertical faces are at a 90° angle, i.e., straight up, or near enough. This is the type of face you commonly see climbers with ropes climbing.

When climbing vertical faces, have an upright body position and keep your weight over your feet as much as possible.

Use your hands and arms for pulling if needed. 

Tips for Climbing Different Types of Faces, Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing Training

Climbing Overhangs

Overhangs are rock faces that are overhung or angled over 90°. 

Climbing an overhang is one of the hardest rock climbing techniques for beginners to do. This is because it requires more strength.

Use heel and toe hooks to take the weight off your arms.

Tips for Climbing Different Types of Faces 2, Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners, Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing Training

Basic Crack Climbing Techniques

You can climb the natural cracks in rocks by wedging your body parts into them.

This rock climbing technique is jamming. Jamming in crack climbing holds can cut your hands. Over time you can condition them, but to prevent injury when you first practice this basic bouldering technique you can tape your hands. 

Hand Jam

Perform a hand jam by wedging the side of your hand in the crack with the thumb on top. 

Tuck your thumb into the palm of your hand.

Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners, How to Jam and Shuffle When Crack-Climbing - Hand Jam - Crack Climbing - Bouldering - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Next, expand your hand to exert opposing pressure against the walls of the crack.

Once conditioned, you can hang your weight off your wedged hand.

HOutdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Hand Jam 2 - Crack Climbing - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

You can also do this in smaller cracks with your finger. This is finger crack climbing and is an advanced crack climbing technique.

Foot Jam

After jamming your hands into the crack, lift a foot and push the front part of your shoe into the crack. 

Stand up on the jammed foot.

Step the other foot up to calf level and jam it in the crack. 

How to Jam and Shuffle When Crack-Climbing - Foot Jam - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Shuffling

Now that your hands and feet are in position, you can move upward by shuffling. 

There are 3 ways to do this.

  • Move your top hand up first, then the lower one below it.
  • Lift the bottom hand out of the crack and hand jam above your upper hand.
  • Use the above 2 techniques together.

How to Jam and Shuffle When Crack-Climbing - Shuffling - Outdoor Bouldering for Beginners - Survival Fitness Plan Survival Climbing

Do the same with your feet.

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Bouldering for Beginners Conclusion

In this rock climbing beginners guide are all the basic bouldering skills you need. 

Remember to always keep in mind the basic climbing principles while using the hand and foot techniques. 

You now also know more advanced rock climbing techniques such as overhangs and crack climbing.

Please remember that safety is paramount. You don’t need fancy equipment when outdoor bouldering, but a crash mat, a friend, and a cell phone is advisable. 

Never climb higher than you can safely fall when bouldering. And if you start climbing higher with ropes, take a professional course or hire a guide.

Also, be sure to take care in the weather. Have enough food, water, and clothing to keep you healthy whilst enjoying your amazing rock climbing experience.

Did you find this rock climbing training for beginners useful? If so, please share it with your friends.

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Sea Survival Skills http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/how-to-survive-at-sea/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/how-to-survive-at-sea/#respond Fri, 20 Jul 2018 13:50:30 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=13037 Knowing a few sea survival techniques is worth the effort. The ocean is, after all, one of the harshest environments to survive in. And for anyone that travels international, having to survive at sea is not so far fetched. 70% of the world is the ocean! That means if your plane goes down, chances are
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The post Sea Survival Skills appeared first on Survival Fitness Plan.

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Knowing a few sea survival techniques is worth the effort. The ocean is, after all, one of the harshest environments to survive in. And for anyone that travels international, having to survive at sea is not so far fetched.

70% of the world is the ocean! That means if your plane goes down, chances are that it will be over water. And if you like cruises, fishing, diving, or any other ocean activity, well.. you get the picture.

In this article, we will go through the sea safety and survival skills you need to have the best chance.

Contents

  • Surviving the Cause
    • How to Survive a Sinking Ship
    • How to Survive a Plane Crash in Ocean
  • How to Stay Afloat in Deep Water
    • In a Liferaft
    • How to Fix a Leak in a Liferaft
    • Without a Life Raft
  • Planning for Survival at Sea and The Will to Live
  • Attracting Rescue at Sea
  • Signs of Land when Lost at Sea
  • Survival Navigation at Sea
    • How to Find North Using the Sun
    • Navigating with the Stars
    • Finding Direction with the Moon
    • How to Make a Compass
  • Movement at Sea
    • Using the Current
    • Using the Wind
    • How to Swim Long Distance with Survival Backstroke
  • Creating Shelter
  • How to Drink Sea Water to Survive
  • Catching Food at Sea
  • How to Fight a Shark
  • Embarking on Land
    • Swimming to Shore
  • Conclusion

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Sea Survival Techniques

Survival in Sea – Surviving the Cause

Before you can start surviving at sea, you will have to survive what put you there in the first place.

Two major reasons for this will be if your boat is sinking or your plane crashes.

Chances of surviving a passenger plane crashing in the ocean are slim, but not impossible. Getting off a sinking boat is easy in comparison, so let’s cover that one first.

How to Survive a Sinking Ship

When you suspect you may need to survive a sinking boat, take the following steps:

  • Put on warm clothing. Wool is best.
  • Cover as much of your body as you can and put on a life jacket.
  • Gather whatever survival provisions you can and get to a lifeboat.

Note: Do not exceed the maximum passengers in a life vessel. Have the healthy hang off the side and swap often.

If you need to jump off the boat, throw something that floats in first and then jump close to it. Once you are in the ocean, inflate your life jacket.

Once in the ocean, get away from the sinking vessel, upwind if you can. If you are too close to it, it is likely to drag you under.

How to Survive a Plane Crash in Ocean

If your plane is crashing into the sea (or anywhere), the same initial steps apply. Put on warm clothes and a life jacket. Gathering provisions will be harder but do it if you can.

To be honest, there isn’t much you can do in a plane crash except to follow the pilot’s/crew’s instructions. If the pilot is down you may need to land the plane yourself. Get to the controls and radio for help.

Using the Radio to Call for Help

  • Put on the headset if there is one.
  • Check the steering wheel or instrument panel for the talk button.
  • Press the button and use the international distress call of “Mayday! Mayday!”
  • Give your situation, destination, and plane call numbers. These should be on the top of the instrument panel.
  • Let go of the talk button and listen for a response.
  • If there is no response, try again.
  • Try three to five times waiting ten seconds between each time for a response.
  • If there is still no response tune the radio to 121.5 and try again. 121.5 is the international emergency channel.

Once you have made contact with someone, follow their instructions to land.

If you cannot contact anyone, you’ll have to try land the plane unguided. The first thing you will want to do is make sure you are flying straight.

Like cars, every model of plane is different, but they will all have the same basic functions.

Sea Survival Techniques, How to Survive a Plane Crash, Survival Fitness Plan

Yolk

  • The Yolk is the steering wheel.
  • It has the same effect as if in a car but is much more sensitive.
  • It also allows you to control pitch.
  • Pull back to pull up and push forward to dive.
  • To fly steady you want to keep the nose about 8cm below the horizon and the wings even.

Altimeter

  • This is the red dial on the instrument panel.
  • It indicates your altitude.
  • The small hand shows your height above sea level in thousand foot increments.
  • The large hand shows the same in hundreds.

Compass

  • The instrument with a small plane on it.
  • The nose of the plane is the direction you are going.

Speedometer

  • Usually in knots.
  • 120 knots is cruising speed.
  • Below 70 knots and you may stall.

Throttle

  • Controls thrust.
  • Pull it towards you to slow the plane and descend.
  • Push it away to speed the plane up and ascend.

Fuel Gauge

  • Usually on the lower part of the panel.

Landing Gear

  • If the plane has a retractable landing gear there will be another leaver between the seats. Most likely near the throttle.
  • It looks like a tire.
  • Some planes have a fixed landing gear so there will not be this leaver.

Ground Pedals

  • Use these pedals when on the ground.
  • The upper ones are the brakes.
  • The lower ones control the direction of the nose wheel.
  • The right pedal will move the plane right.
  • The left one will move the plane left.

How to Land a Plane in an Emergency

  • Slow down to about 90 knots by pulling back on the throttle.
  • Let the nose drop to about 11cm below the horizon.
  • Deploy the landing gear (if applicable) unless landing on water.
  • Find the longest and smoothest place to land that you can.
  • If you have enough fuel, fly over to look for obstructions, then circle back to land. Give yourself a wide birth.
  • Line up the landing strip so that it is just off the right-wing tip at one thousand feet.
  • As you approach to land pull back on the throttle.
  • Do not let the nose drop more than 15cm below the horizon.
  • The rear wheels should touch first at about 60 knots (stall speed).
  • Pull all the way back on the throttle ensuring the nose doesn’t dip too steep.
  • Gently pull back on the yolk as the plane touches the ground.
  • Use the pedals on the floor to steer and brake.
  • If you are going into an obstruction (e.g., trees) let the wings take the impact.
  • Once you have stopped get everyone out as soon as possible.

Assuming you have landed in the ocean and are still alive, get out of the plane. You do not want to sink with it.

Swim upwind from it so you do not get dragged under by its pull.

Also, whether you are abandoning ship or surviving a plane crash:

  • If there is a chance of underwater explosion swim on your back.
  • Swim under any danger, e.g., fire.

Instruction for how to swim on your back using the survival backstroke is later in this article.

How to Stay Afloat in Deep Water

Once off and away from the sinking vessel, you need to know how to survive adrift at sea.

How to Survive at Sea in a Liferaft

Whether your liferaft is inflatable or a hard boat, there are things you must do to ensure surviving a disaster lost at sea.

  • Secure all passengers and equipment to it
  • Do not jump into it
  • Check for leaks daily
  • Waterproof everything that requires it

In addition to the above, if in an inflatable liferaft:

  • Wait until you are clear of the wreck before inflating it unless you can board it and stay dry
  • Inflate the liferaft so it is firm, but not too hard. Compensate for the surrounding temperature (heat makes air expand)
  • Check inflation daily
  • Make sure nothing can puncture it

To board a liferaft from the water

  • Move to one end (not the side)
  • Put one leg over the edge and roll inside

If the liferaft has a line attached

  • Grab the line from the opposite side of where it is attached
  • Brace your feet against the liferaft and pull yourself in
  • Expect the other end of the liferaft to come up
  • You can adjust this technique to right an overturned liferaft

To help someone else on board

  • Hold them by their shoulders
  • Have them lift one leg over the end of the raft (if possible)
  • Roll them in

How to Fix a Leak in a Liferaft

If you are in a hard life raft (not inflatable) you are more likely to get a leak on impact with the water.

When you see little bubbles in an inflatable liferaft, it is a sign of leaks.

In either case, place plastic it across the leak on the outside of the boat. Water pressure will help to hold it on place, but also try to seal it with duct tape, glue, etc.

Duct tape can repair small cracks also.

How to Survive in the Sea Without a Life Raft

When you don’t have a liferaft, your first priority is to get one! If there is one nearby, attract attention using noise and light.

When there is no liferaft, build one with whatever you can, e.g., wreckage from your crash.

How to Improvise a Flotation Device with a Pair of Trousers
When there is no other option, you can use your clothing to stay afloat.

To do it with your trousers:

  • Knot the bottoms of the legs
  • Hold the trousers behind your head by the waistband

How to Survive When Abandoning Ship - Disaster Survival - Survival Fitness Plan Urban and Wilderness Survival Training 1

  • Bring them over your head in front of you in a sharp motion to fill them with air.
  • Hold the waist below water to trap the air.
  • If you need more air, go underwater and breathe into the pants.

Sea Survival Techniques - Disaster Survival - Survival Fitness Plan Urban and Wilderness Survival Training 2

Planning for Survival at Sea and The Will to Live

Ok, so you have survived the initial crash and are floating in the ocean.

Now what?

Now you need to survive until rescue arrives. But it may take a while.

For most people, there will be times that you feel like giving up. The moment you give up is the moment you die. You must keep your will to live.

Never give up!

I know that is much easier to say from behind my computer than it is from the middle of the ocean, but it is still true.

The longest survival at sea so far is 484 days!

Reference: Guinness Book of World Records

The will to live is very important and applies to ALL survival situations. You must keep a strong will to live and have faith that you will live. Different things motivate different people. Common ones are family and god.

Of course, having blind faith is not enough. Having the will to live also means being proactive in your survival. Always be vigilant for things that will help you, as well as pre-empting problems. If you are in a group, assign lookouts on short shifts. Look out for signs of life, land, rescue, leaks, and anything that could be useful.

How to Survive in Sea – Attracting Rescue at Sea

From the very first moment you become stranded at sea, you must be on the lookout for rescue. It is your best chance of survival, and the sooner you get it, the better.

Your liferaft may have some signaling devices. There are various types of flares. Follow the instructions on them. Check out some signal flares here.

If you have nothing else, improvise. A mirror is an effective signaling tool. Use it to reflect the sun towards a possible rescue ship or plane. In fact, you can use any screen, e.g., your smartphone.

Most life jackets will have a whistle and lights. You can also use these to maintain contact with other survivors in other liferafts. View the best lifejackets on the market.

If there is no land in sight, or you are near shipping lanes, wait at the crash site for at least 72 hours. You can keep your position by making a sea anchor. Tie weighted objects to a line.

Sea Survival Techniques - Survival Fitness Plan Urban and Wilderness Survival Training 1

Keep your position by making a sea anchor.

How to Survive Lost at Sea – Signs of Land when Lost at Sea

Besides a fast rescue, your best chance of surviving at sea is to find land. So if you see it, or know where it is, head for it.

Signs of land include:

  • A constant wind with a decreasing swell. Land is wind-ward.
  • A green tint on the underside of clouds.
  • Isolated cumulus clouds.
  • Muddy water indicates silt from a large river mouth.
  • Lighter colored water indicates shallow water.
  • Seabirds fly away from land before noon and return to it in the afternoon.
  • Odors and sounds of land including smoke, vegetation, surf, animals, etc.

Sea Survival Techniques - Survival Fitness Plan Urban and Wilderness Survival Training 2

Survival Navigation at Sea

Maybe you can not spot land, but you know where it is. Great! You need to navigate there.

In this section, you will learn how to survive being lost at sea using survival navigation.

With today’s technology, there are easy ways to navigate, such as GPS. But batteries run out, and salt water is never good for electronics. Still, a good marine GPS can’t be beaten. Check here to see the best in today’s market.

Knowledge of map and compass navigation is an excellent skill to have for life in general. You can learn more about that here. A reliable compass is essential. My favorites are by Silva. Get yours here.

The navigation I want to look at in this article is survival navigation for the sea. That is, when you do not have a GPS or even a compass.

How to Find North Using the Sun

Here are some basics of sun navigation:

  • The sun rises in the east and sets in the west.
  • In the northern hemisphere the sun is due south at midday. In the southern hemisphere it is due north.

Now for something a little more accurate, how to tell direction with a watch.

For this method you need an analog watch. I’ll explain how to do it with a digital watch after I’ve explained how to do it normally.

Hold your wristwatch in front of you like a compass, and line a small twig or something similar along the edge of it. Your aim is to cast a shadow toward the center of the watch.

Now turn the watch until the shadow splits in half the distance between the hour hand and 12 on the watch face. In the Northern hemisphere, 6 is pointing north. In the Southern hemisphere it is opposite, i.e., 12 points north.

If you do not have a twig you can still do this, but it won’t be as accurate. In the Northern Hemisphere, point the hour hand towards the sun. The center of the angle between the hour hand and twelve o’clock mark is the north-south line.

In the Southern Hemisphere, point the 12 mark towards the sun instead.

If you only have a digital watch you can still use it in the same way. You have to estimate where the hour hand will be. Use 12, 3, 6, and 9 o-clock angles to guide you to the other hours, and smaller increments for half/quarter hours.

Note: Your watch must be set to the time zone you are in. So if you were flying internationally and have no idea where you are, this may be a problem. Also, make sure your watch isn’t set to daylight savings.

Navigating with the Stars

Navigating by the stars is more accurate than doing it by the sun.

Finding the North Star Polaris
By locating the North Star, you can draw an imaginary line from it to a landmark back on earth. With this, you can steer north.

Finding a landmark in the open sea is difficult, but do your best. You can even use another star lower to the horizon.

The North Star is NOT the brightest star in the sky. The reason it is good for navigation is because it does not move. To help you find the North Star you can use two other constellations. The Big Dipper and Cassiopeia. Cassiopeia is like an upside down “W”.

Follow the ‘ladle’ of the big dipper up about 5x its length. This is about halfway to Cassiopeia. The bright star you see in this area is the North Star.

Navigating with the North Star, Sea Survival Techniques, Survival Fitness Plan

By United States Army [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Navigating by the Southern Cross
In the Southern Hemisphere, you can use the Southern Cross to find South. The Southern Cross constellation is 5 stars, and the 4 brightest stars make a cross that is angled to one side.

Imagine a line 5 times the distance between the two stars that make up the long axis of the cross. Now imagine a line from this point to a landmark on “the ground”.

This gives true south. True north will be behind you as you are looking at the point.

Navigating with the Southern Cross, Sea Survival Techniques

By United States Army [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Finding Direction with the Moon

This is not very accurate but is simple to use and easy to remember.

If it is before midnight, the illuminated side of the moon faces west. If it is after midnight, the illuminated side faces east.

How to Make a Compass

To make an improvised compass you need to magnetize metal. A sewing needle is in most survival kits and is perfect for the job. Anything similar will also work.

There are 2 basic ways to magnetize metal:

  1. Rub it with a magnet, always in the same direction. Speakers have magnets at the back of them which you can use, but do not break your radio!
  2. Place it in a coil with a direct current in it.

You can magnetize iron, nickel, and steel. That means aluminum soda cans won’t work.

Hang the magnetized needle on a string or float it in the water on top of anything that is not metal.

How to Survive Stranded at Sea – Movement at Sea

Once you know where land is, you have to get to it. You can paddle, but that uses a lot of energy. It is better to save your strength until actually shoring.

So unless you have a motor, you will need to use either the current or the wind.

Using the Current

The current is more useful when approaching land, but you can use it in open sea also. To use the current, deflate your raft a little so it rides low in the water. Also, keep yourselves low in the raft. Deploying your sea anchor if you have one will also help.

Using the Wind

To use the wind, you will need to improvise a sail. If you do, prevent capsizing by holding the bottom of it with your hands. This way you can release it if there is a sudden gust of wind.

Using the wind is opposite to using the current. You want to ride high, not low. Inflate the raft, sit up, and pull in your sea anchor.

How to Survive a Storm at Sea
To prevent capsizing in rough waters you should keep low. Stream your sea anchor from the bow (front). If there is more than one liferaft in your groups, tying them together will improve stability.

How to Swim Long Distance with Survival Backstroke

When you need to swim long distance and/or stay afloat in the water for a really long time, do survival backstroke.

Survival backstroke is floating on your back as you propel through the water. You use a simultaneous frog/breaststroke kick and a sculling motion with your hands. Your arms and legs move and come together at the same time.

The main goal of the survival backstroke is to conserve energy and reduce heat loss.

To maximize energy conservation, do the survival backstroke very slow. Take short strokes and glide for as long as possible. Only take the next stroke when you feel your legs dropping or you loose forward momentum.

Sea Survival Techniques, How to do Survival Backstroke, Survival Fitness Plan Swim Workouts Training

Short strokes minimize heat loss from under your armpits and between your legs. Your arms should not extend beyond your shoulders. Also, at the end of each stroke, bring your arms and legs together. Hold them close but comfortable against your body.

Sea Survival Techniques, How to do Survival Backstroke, Survival Fitness Plan

Also use the survival backstroke is if an underwater explosion is likely. You will want to go faster so you can escape the blast, so make your strokes larger. Take your next stroke sooner than normal, but not too soon. Make the most out of your streamlined glide position while achieving the most speed.

Sea Survival Techniques, How to do Survival Backstroke, Survival Fitness Plan

How to Survive Being Stranded at Sea – Creating Shelter

Finding shelter when stranded out in sea is harder than on land, but not impossible. You can use any clothing or tarpaulin to shelter you from the cold and sun. If you have some poles you can even construct a roof.

How to Drink Sea Water to Survive

IMPORTANT: Ration any food and water you have in supplies from the start. Even if you are expecting rescue, anything can happen.

Also, always try to live off the sea before using your rations.

Learning how to survive at sea without water means learning how to find water!

First of all, never drink sea water. It will lead to faster dehydration. Instead, you need to catch and store rainwater whenever you can. Any plastic will do the trick. A tarpaulin, sails, the raft itself, etc.

Although not as effective, fabric will also work. It will absorb water which you can wring out into containers.

The first rainwater you catch will wash the salt off whatever you are catching it with, so don’t drink that. It is still useful to clean wounds and wash food.

If you are at sea for a while, fabrics will have salt crystals, so wash them out with sea water first. Seawater is salty, but salt crystals are worse!

Catching Food at Sea

If you don’t get rescued or find land within a day, you will want to find food. Fishing is the obvious answer, but you can also eat seabirds, planktons, seaweed, etc.

Small fish will gather underneath your raft. A simple handline, hook, and lure will do the trick. Even a simple survival kit will have a small fishing kit in it. Get yourself a survival kit!

If you don’t have fishing line, any string can work. Shoelaces, paracord, etc. If you do have fishing line, be careful not to cut yourself. Anything flashy makes a good lure. Be very careful with the hook or anything sharp if in an inflatable liferaft.

When you do catch a fish, use its guts as bait.

Do not hang around after spilling blood in the ocean. It may attract sharks.

How to Fight a Shark

The vast majority of shark attacks on humans are mistaken identity. Humans don’t taste good to sharks! Still, they are the king of the ocean, so you want to stay out of their way.

Like most animals, food is what will attract a shark, whether it is real or mistaken identity. Blood and fish are the biggest attractions. So is anything that resembles these, like shiny objects or human waste.

Whether you are in a life raft or not, if you spot a shark, be loud and slap the water.

If you don’t have a liferaft and are in a group, bunch together and face out. Everyone should shout underwater and slap the surface.

When a shark starts circling you, it is a sign of attack. When it comes at you, strike at its gills, eyes, and nose.

What to do When Lost at Sea – Embarking on Land

Once you find land you must first choose a good landing point. This is much easier to do in daylight. It is better to land on the downwind side of an island. Also, select somewhere that will be easy to beach or swim ashore.

As you approach the shore, note the landscape. Look for high ground, vegetation, water courses, etc. It is easier to see these things from a distance so make the most of it. If you are in a group, choose a meeting point in case of separation. Also, secure all your gear to your body and have a floatation aid ready.

As you come in to beach, do the following:

  • Stay in the raft for as long as possible
  • Take down the sail
  • Deflate the raft a little so it rides low in the water
  • Keep low in the raft
  • Put a sea anchor out to keep you pointing at the shore, unless you are going through coral
  • Head for gaps in the surf. Waves usually occur in sets of 7, from small to large
  • Steer clear of rocks, ice, and other obstacles
  • If possible, keep the sun out of your eyes
  • Attempt to use the waves to carry you into shore
  • Paddle hard

In Heavy Surf

  • Point towards the sea
  • Paddle into approaching waves

Once you are past the wave breaks you want to avoid getting swept back out to sea. Make the liferaft as light as possible and take out the sea anchor.

If the under-current is taking you back out, partly fill the raft with water and stream the anchor towards the shore.

Swimming to Shore

When swimming to shore without a raft, face the shore and sit with your feet about a meter below your head. This way, you can take any impact with your feet.

When the waves are big, swim to shore in the troughs between them.

If a wave going out to sea approaches, go under it.

Finally, if you get caught in the undertow, don’t try to swim against it. Instead, swim parallel to the shore until you can swim in.

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Conclusion

Sea safety & survival is an important subject to learn about. If you survive the accident, ration any supplies you may have and stick around the site for rescue. If nothing comes after a few days, and/or you know where land is, head for it.

While navigating the seas you will need all the things of any survival situation. Shelter, food, and water. Try to live off the sea as much as possible before using your rations. Never drink sea water and keep an eye out for anything useful. This includes rescue, raft leaks, sharks, land, etc.

Finally, remember to never give up. The longest person to survive at sea did so for 484 days, and the 2nd longest was 438 days.

Photo Credit: Senior Airman Mariette Adams

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Poisonous Snake Bite First Aid Procedures http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/poisonous-snake-bite-first-aid-procedures/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/poisonous-snake-bite-first-aid-procedures/#respond Fri, 20 Jul 2018 11:05:47 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=12946 In this article, you will learn poisonous snake bite first aid procedures. It covers snake bite symptoms and snake bite treatment. This is life-saving information if you live in or visit a country with poisonous snakes. It also talks about dog snake bite symptoms and treatment, and snake bite on cats. Finally, it gives specific
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In this article, you will learn poisonous snake bite first aid procedures. It covers snake bite symptoms and snake bite treatment. This is life-saving information if you live in or visit a country with poisonous snakes.

It also talks about dog snake bite symptoms and treatment, and snake bite on cats. Finally, it gives specific information on some of the most poisonous snakes in the world.

Contents

  • Prevention of Snake Bites
    • Snake Bite Protection
  • Poisonous Snake Bite Symptoms
  • Snake Bite Treatment
    • Pressure Immobilization Technique
    • Non-Poisonous Snake Bites
  • Snake Bite on Dogs and Cats
    • Snake Bite Dog Symptoms
    • Cat and Dog Snake Bite Treatment
  • Specific Snake Bite Information
    • Black Mamba
    • Blue Krait
    • Copperhead
    • Coral Snake
    • Death Adder
    • Eastern Brown Snake
    • Philippines Cobra
    • Rattlesnake
    • Sea Snake (Cottonmouth)
    • Taipan
    • Tiger Snake
    • Viper Snake Bite First Aid
  • Conclusion

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Poisonous Snake Bite First Aid Procedures

Prevention of Snake Bites

Prevention is always the best cure, and most poisonous snake bites are easy to avoid.

As with any animal, stay away from them. Most will run away before you know they are there anyway. If you do come across one, stand still and back away. Give it plenty of room to escape. Do not tease or try to move it. That is asking for trouble.

Although each snake likes slightly different conditions, most like to hide. Watch out in tall grass, piles of wood or rocks, piles of leaves, etc.

Snakes are cold-blooded so need to warm in the sun. Be extra careful when hiking on a sunny but cool day. This is when snakes are most likely to be sunbathing in the open.

Snake Bite Protection

If working in snake territory, wear protective clothing. Long pants, tall boots, and leather gloves are good.

You can even get special snake bite proof pants and snake bite proof boots. Get your snake bite proof clothing here.

Poisonous Snake Bite Symptoms

Different snakes can present different symptoms. In general, you will get some or all the following:

  • 2 puncture marks
  • Blurred vision
  • Breathing difficulty, sometimes extreme
  • Local swelling and redness
  • Local pain, often severe
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Salivation
  • Sweating

*Local refers to being near/around the bite site.

Snake Bite Treatment

As with all life-threatening first aid situations, follow DRABC. Read a detailed article about DRABC here.

Besides DRABC, specific first aid treatment for snake bites is as follows:

  • Record the time of bite
  • *Identify the snake if possible
  • Keep the victim calm and and as still as possible
  • Remove constricting clothing and jewelry
  • Administer antivenin if available
  • Get to a hospital ASAP

*Only do this if it is safe. Don’t try to hunt it down. Take a picture from a safe distance if possible.

DO NOT:

  • Apply a cold compress
  • Apply a tourniquet
  • Cut the snake bite
  • Give medication (unless directed by a medical professional)
  • Pump or suck the venom out
  • Raise the bite

If you live or work close to poisonous snakes it is wise to have a snake bite first aid kit. Ensure you have snake bite antivenin for the snakes you are most likely to come in contact with.

Pressure Immobilization Technique

The pressure immobilization technique is not only for treating snake bites. Use can use it for most venomous bites and stings. The idea is to slow the venom’s movement into the circulatory system. This buys time until the arrival of advanced medical care.

When applying the pressure immobilization technique, keep the patient as still as possible. Especially the site of the venomous snake bite. Do not elevate the wound.

In general, only apply the pressure immobilization technique for:

  • Australian snakes, all species
  • Blue-ringed octopus
  • Conus
  • Funnel-web spiders
  • If possible, use an elastic roller bandage
  • Bandage upwards from the lower part of the bitten or stung limb, and continue up as high as possible. Each wrap should overlap the last.
  • Ensure the bandage does not impair perfusion (blood flow)
  • Mark the location of the bite on the bandage
  • Immobilize the limb
  • Check perfusion often as continued swelling may impair it

Applying the Pressure Immobilization Technique 1 - Survival Fitness Plan Remote Area First Aid Training

Note: Do not bandage bites/stings to the head or torso. Keep patient still and seek medical care ASAP.

Non-Poisonous Snake Bites

This article focuses on poisonous snake bites, but I want to touch on non-poisonous snake bites too.

The physical symptoms will be the same:

  • 2 puncture wounds
  • Local swelling and redness
  • Local pain

You will not normally get the other symptoms (vomiting, blurred vision, etc).

Treat a non-venomous snake wound as a puncture wound. If you have any doubt, treat the snake bite as venomous!

The basic steps for treating a non-venomous snake wound are:

  • Apply direct pressure to stop the bleeding
  • Clean the wound with mild soap and clean water
  • Apply a topical antiseptic such as Povidone Iodine
  • Cover the wound with a sterile bandage
  • See a doctor for follow-up asap. You may need antibiotics.

Snake Bite on Dogs and Cats

Dogs and cats may try to play with or kill snakes. This often results in them getting bit.

Snake Bite Dog Symptoms

Symptoms of a snake bite in dogs are like those on humans, but the onset will be faster since they are smaller. In general, the smaller the dog, the less chance of survival it will have. Following this logic, a cat snake bite is even more lethal.

Look for the following symptoms:

  • Blood in urine
  • Collapse
  • Dilated pupils
  • Loss of bladder and bowel control
  • Muscle spasm
  • Paralysis
  • Sudden weakness
  • Vomiting

Cat and Dog Snake Bite Treatment

The treatment for snake bites on animals is the same as for humans. The only difference is to go to a vet instead of a hospital.

Carry your pet wherever it needs to go and get antivenin as quickly as possible.

If possible, you can use the pressure immobilization technique, e.g., for a snake bite on dog leg.

Whether it is a rattlesnake bite on a dog or some other species, the main thing is to keep the animal still. Get to a vet and give it some snake bite antivenom ASAP.

Specific Snake Bite Information

There are many types of snakes around the world. Here we will go over some of the most poisonous ones.

The general treatment is the same for all poisonous snakes. The difference is the type of antivenin. This is why it is important to identify the type of snake bite. Study the pictures.

Note: If someone gets bitten and did not identify the type of snake, do not bother trying to find out. Get to a hospital. They have tests to discover the type of venom.

Black Mamba Bite First Aid

This fast striking snake is in many parts of Africa. Unlike other Mamba species, the Black Mamba is not primarily a tree dweller. Except in the jungle, it prefers rocky crevices, scrub, abandoned burrows, etc.

It is not as aggressive as most people are lead to believe, but I would definitely not mess with it.

Black Mamba bite symptoms include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Confusion
  • Convulsions
  • Distorted vision
  • Fever
  • Lack of muscle control
  • Local pain
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Pallor
  • Paralysis
  • Respiratory failure
  • Salivation and foaming of the mouth
  • Shock
  • Tingling in extremities
  • Tingling in mouth
1 Black Mamba Bite First Aid, Poisonous Snake Bite First Aid Procedures, Survival Fitness Plan

Danleo~commonswiki assumed (based on copyright claims). [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY 2.5 ], via Wikimedia Commons

Blue Krait Bite First Aid

This nocturnal snake is from South East Asia. They are timid most of the time but are highly venomous. They like to hang around water and can grow up to 1m long.

Blue Krait bite symptoms include:

  • Cramps
  • Muscle paralysis
  • Paralysis
  • Spasms
  • Tremors

Copperhead Bite First Aid

Copperheads are not aggressive, but if you step on one it will react. They are common in the Eastern states of North America. You will find them among rocks, in the woods, or near water sources.

There are also Copperheads in Australia, but they are a different species.

Copperhead bite symptoms include:

  • Change in skin color
  • Low blood pressure
  • Pain
  • Shock
  • Weakness

Coral Snake Bite First Aid

Coral snakes are common in the south of the US. They like to hide in leaf piles, so don’t step or kick one while you are walking!

The symptoms of Coral Snake bites are often delayed by hours.

Coral Snake bite symptoms include:

  • Change in skin color
  • Convulsions
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Drooping eyelids
  • Headache
  • Pain
  • Paralysis
  • Shock
  • Stomach pain

Death Adder Bite First Aid

The Death Adder is in Australia and New Guinea. It likes to hide among loose leaf litter and debris and is quite hard to see, especially if not keeping an eye out for one.

Deathadder bite symptoms include:

  • Drooping eyelids
  • Muscle weakness
  • Nausea
  • Paralysis
  • Respiratory failure
  • Speech impairment

Eastern Brown Snake Bite First Aid

This venomous snake makes its home in the major population centers of Australia. It is fast and may chase you. Luckily, less than half their bites contain venom, and they only react to movement. If you encounter one, stand very still.

Eastern Brown Snake bite symptoms include:

  • Cardiac arrest
  • Collapse
  • Convulsions
  • Diarrhea
  • Dizziness
  • Paralysis
  • Renal failure
6 Eastern Brown Snake Bite First Aid, Poisonous Snake Bite First Aid Procedures, Survival Fitness Plan

By Poyt448 Peter Woodard [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons

Philippines Cobra Bite First Aid

This snake has the most poisonous venom of all the cobra’s, and it can spit up to 3 meters. It lives almost anywhere, especially near water.

Philippines Cobra bite symptoms include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Cardiac failure
  • Convulsions
  • Diarrhea
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Respiratory failure
  • Vomiting

Rattlesnake Bite First Aid

Rattlesnakes are one of the most common poisonous snakes in North America. They are also the largest of the poisonous snakes. They like to sunbathe so watch for them on top of rocks, logs, and in open areas.

If you hear the rattle of a rattlesnake, back away. It is your warning!

Rattlesnake bite symptoms include:

  • Drooping eyelids
  • Muscle fatigue
  • Low blood pressure
  • Severe pain
  • Thirst
  • Tiredness

Sea Snake Bite First Aid

Can a snake bite in water? Yes, it can. And all sea/water snakes are very poisonous. In fact, some think the most venomous snake in the world is the Belcher’s Sea Snake from SE Asia and Northern Australia.

The water moccasin is a common water-snake in the southeastern states of the US. They are commonly called a Cottonmouth snake.

Cottonmouth bite symptoms include:

  • Change in skin color
  • Low blood pressure
  • Pain
  • Shock
  • Weakness

Taipan Bite First Aid

There are 3 sub-species of Taipan, all found in Australia. The Coastal Taipan is like the Australian version of the Black Mamba. It has similar aggressive behavior and toxicity.

The Inland Taipan is more venomous but not as aggressive as its coastal relative. This competes with the Belcher’s Sea Snake as most venomous snake in the world.

The 3rd is the Central Ranges Taipan which was only discovered in 2007.

Inland Taipan bite symptoms include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Collapse
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Paralysis
  • Vomiting

Tiger Snake Bite First Aid

Tiger Snakes are common near water in Australia. They will often run from loud noises but will attack if cornered.

Tiger Snake bite symptoms include:

  • Foot pain
  • Neck pain
  • Tingling
  • Numbness
  • Sweating
  • Reparatory failure
  • Paralysis

Viper Snake Bite First Aid

Vipers are all over the world, but the most poisonous ones are in Asia. They are most active at night and after rain. They anger easily which make them especially dangerous.

Viper bite symptoms include:

  • Bleeding from the gums
  • Delayed cardiac failure
  • Delayed respiratory failure
  • Facial swelling
  • Local blistering
  • Local pain
  • Local swelling
  • Low blood pressure
  • Necrosis
  • Vomiting
Pit Viper Bite First Aid, Poisonous Snake Bite First Aid Procedures, Survival Fitness Plan

Green Pit Viper. Via Maxpixel.com.

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Conclusion

There are many venomous snakes in the world and most people will come across one every now and again. If you do, remember to stay still and back away slowly. Give it plenty of room to escape and it will have no reason to attack you.

General first aid for snake bites is not complicated. Keep the victim still and get them some snake bite antivenin ASAP. For Australian snake bites, use the pressure immobilization technique.

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How to do the Illinois Agility Test http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/illinois-agility-test/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/illinois-agility-test/#respond Fri, 20 Jul 2018 10:44:25 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=10593 Learn how to do the Illinois Agility Test. So what is the Illinois Agility Test? The normal purpose of Illinois agility test is to assess speed and athletic agility. The Australian Police use it in their recruitment test, which is how I came across it. My friend was joining the police. In the Survival Fitness
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Learn how to do the Illinois Agility Test. So what is the Illinois Agility Test? The normal purpose of Illinois agility test is to assess speed and athletic agility. The Australian Police use it in their recruitment test, which is how I came across it. My friend was joining the police.

In the Survival Fitness Plan, the Illinois Agility Test is a training tool as opposed to a test of agility. Being agile is great for parkour and other Survival Fitness Plan activities.

Contents

  • How to Set up the Illinois Agility Test
    • Illinois Agility Test Diagram
  • How to do the Illinois Agility Test
    • How to do the Illinois Agility Test Video
  • Illinois Agility Test Tips
    • Get up and Sprint
    • How to Sprint Faster
    • Slalom Running (Weaving)
  • Conclusion

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How to Set up the Illinois Agility Test

To set up the Illinois Agility Test you a space at least 5m x 10m in area and 7 markers. Athletic cone markers (witches hats) are ideal. You can get some here.

Have a baseline for your start and finish. Place the starter marker on the far left and the finish marker 5 meters to the starter marker’s right.

In the middle of these markers place another marker, but put it a little above the baseline. You need to have enough room to run between it and the baseline. A 1/2 m gap is good.

Place another 3 markers along the same line vertically. Spread them out 3.3 meters apart.

Finally, 2 meters to the side of the top marker, place another marker. Also, place one on the other side.

The placement of the markers does not have to be exact. 4 or 5 natural steps is more or less 3.3 meters. The exception to this is if you want to compare times and/or are testing for some professional purposes. In that case, a long measuring tape. Get a sports measuring tape here.

Illinois Agility Test Diagram

I got this Illinois Agility Test diagram from sjosm.org but I see it all over the web so I doubt they drew it. I can only assume the creator has allowed liberal use of it. If you are the creator of this image and want me to take it off this website please let me know.

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How to do the Illinois Agility Test

To do the Illinois Agility Test, start at the start marker lying flat on your stomach. Your hands are behind the start line. Start on your timers command.

  • Sprint up and around the first marker on the left, at the 10m marker.
  • Sprint back and then weave through the center cones, up and back.
  • Sprint up and around the last marker on the right, at the 10m marker.
  • Sprint back and stop the timer when you cross the finish marker.

How to do the Illinois Agility Test Video

This video gives a good break-down of how to do the Illinois Agility Test. The markers are set up a little differently, but the actual test process is the same.

FYI. The maximum Illinois Agility Test time allowed for the Australian Police is 20 seconds. Try to be better than that so you can outrun the police if you need to 😉 .

Illinois Agility Test Tips

Once you are. familiar with the Illinois Agility Test, you can concentrate on improving your speed. The best way to improve your Illinois Agility Test time is to focus on the individual elements. There are 3 basic skills you can improve in;

  1. Get up and sprint
  2. Sprinting
  3. Slalom

Get up and Sprint

The most common mistake here is that people get up and then sprint in 2 distinct movements. Instead, work on exploding up straight into the sprint.

To do this, push up off the ground so you propel yourself forward, as opposed to pushing straight up. At the same time, lunge one leg forward so it is in position to push straight off into the sprint. Use your strongest leg to make the lunge so you get as much explosive power into your sprint as possible. For most people, this will be your right leg.

How to Sprint Faster

If you have a bad running technique improving it can make a big difference in your sprint speed.

Sprinting is also an efficient form of exercise. It is far more effective to do short sprints than it is to run/jog long distance. Sprinting gives the same health benefits in a much shorter time. It also has other benefits that jogging or running do not offer.

Unlike jogging or running, when you sprint you will be creating explosive power. This is very important in parkour, which is a big part of the Survival Fitness Plan. Also, sprinting is more useful than jogging when it comes to escaping from danger. If you do need to run a long distance then by practicing parkour you will have the endurance to do so anyway. More-so than if you went jogging every day.

Proper Running Technique

Proper running technique will enable you to go faster and longer while using less energy.

When running (sprinting) keep your elbows bent at 90º and move your hand from your pocket to your chin.

How to do the Illinois Agility Test, How to Sprint Faster - Survival Fitness Plan Parkour Training1

Move your knees and elbows in unison. As you drive your elbows back, bring your knees up. Then as your hand goes to your chin, drive your leg back down.

Be sure to bring your hand from your pocket to your chin. The further back your elbows go the higher your knees will go.

How to do the Illinois Agility Test, How to Sprint Faster - Survival Fitness Plan Parkour Training2

Keep your chin level, eyes focused forward, core engaged, and shoulders relaxed. Also, have your torso upright as opposed to leaning forward. This posture keeps your mass vertical. It means your feet will strike the ground with more force and hence you will produce more speed.

How to do the Illinois Agility Test, How to Sprint Faster - Survival Fitness Plan Parkour Training3

Even when you get tired, always keep correct running form.

Breathing

While running you use up a lot of oxygen which you need to replace.

Breathe Through your Mouth

This allows more oxygen to enter your body. It also prevents you from clenching your teeth together which may cause headaches.

Note: When breathing normal, breathe through your nose. Your nose is the body’s air treatment system. It filters, humidifies, and warms the air before it reaches the rest of your body. Also, breathe through your nose if you have to run in a high pollution area.

Use Belly Breathing

Learn this first by lying on your back. As you exhale use your stomach muscles to help expel all the air out of your lungs. To inhale, relax your stomach muscles and let the air come in.

Once you are comfortable with belly breathing use it while sprinting.

Breathe in Step

Breathing in time to your steps is the easiest way to regulate the rhythm of your breath. This is useful to track and control certain things while you are running.

At a normal run rate (not sprinting) stay at a 2:2 ratio. This means to inhale over two steps and then exhale over two steps.

During harder runs, you may need to change the ratio to 1:2 or 2:1.

When you go up a hill maintain the same ratio of breath as you were using before the hill. This ensures you use the same amount of energy to get over the hill.

To fix a side-stitch while running slow your breathing to a deeper 3:3 rhythm.

Another way to fix a stitch is to expand and contract your diaphragm in the opposite direction as normal. When you breathe in, make your stomach contract. When you exhale, make your stomach expand.

Note: Breathing at a 1:1 ratio or faster may lead to hyperventilation. Also, if using a 3:3 ratio or slower you may not get enough oxygen into your body.

You can also use running drills to further improve your sprint speed.

Slalom Running (Weaving)

The act of weaving (running slalom) is itself an exercise used to improve agility. This means that there isn’t much you can do to improve it other than to actually practice it.

Many beginners weave too wide around the cones. In particular when circling around the top one. Keeping your turning circle tight can help shave a second or two from your time.

Training in evasive running or doing other agility improvement activities to may also help.

How to Train in Evasive Running

Evasive Running is the ability to move away from an obstacle whilst running. Train to evade humans as they will be the hardest to outsmart. You want to go in whichever direction is hardest for your opponent to go.

When learning evasive running use a running speed a little slower than sprinting. You want to be quick but not so quick that you will get injured whilst performing the movement.

As you approach your opponent look him in the eye. It will make it harder for him to predict where you are going. You want him to think that you are charging straight at him.

If your opponent is square on with you but is not on the balls of his feet then it should be easy to pass him on either side. This is in the left picture.

If he has one side forward more then evade him by going to the other side of his body. It will most likely be his weaker side and will also be harder for him to maneuver in that direction. In the right picture, you would maneuver to her left since her right foot is forward.

How to do the Illinois Agility Test, How to Train in Evasive Running - Survival Fitness Plan Parkour Training1

If he angles away from you then go the opposite way. In the picture, she has stepped to her left with her right foot. Evade to her right, to the outside of her.

How to do the Illinois Agility Test, How to Train in Evasive Running - Survival Fitness Plan Parkour Training2

You can practice this with a friend. Have your friend face you square on as you run towards him. When you are close your friend steps toward you and you evade in the best direction.

You could also practice against a stationary object. Run towards it and evade on either side at the last moment.

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Conclusion

So now you know how to do the Illinois Agility Test. You also have quite a few Illinois Agility Test tips to help you improve your speed times.

Once you get familiar with the basic test, concentrate on improving on each of the 3 elements. Pop up straight into the sprint, run with good form, and keep your turning circles tight. Above all, keep practicing.

Photo Credit: Lance Cpl. Jericho W. Crutcher

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Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/beginner-yoga-for-flexibility-strength/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/beginner-yoga-for-flexibility-strength/#respond Thu, 19 Jul 2018 07:17:12 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=10505 This is a beginner yoga for flexibility and strength routine. The best yoga for flexibility for beginners is basic yoga. This is so you can go into a deep stretch without fear of injury. This daily yoga for flexibility routine is a full body stretch. It goes for 10-15 minutes, but you can make it
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This is a beginner yoga for flexibility and strength routine. The best yoga for flexibility for beginners is basic yoga. This is so you can go into a deep stretch without fear of injury. This daily yoga for flexibility routine is a full body stretch. It goes for 10-15 minutes, but you can make it longer if you want.

Each pose described also has safety information which you should follow. Also listed are the ailments each post can help with in relation to curing yoga.

Contents

  • Breathing
  • Poses
  • Picture of All Yoga Poses in Sequence
  • Yoga Nidra
  • Conclusion

Discover How to Use Yoga as Medicine to Cure 50+ Common Ailments
Get Your Copy of Curing Yoga Today

Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength Routine

This basic yoga for flexibility routine is a good morning yoga routine. But you can do it at any time if mornings don’t suit you.

After the routine, it is a good idea to meditate. I like yoga nidra, but any meditation is good.

Life Force and Breathing

Correct breathing is a big part of yoga.

Life force is a non-physical essential energy. It is present throughout the universe, and the universe provides it in abundance for all. Although science rejects the concept of life force, the notion of it is present in most cultures.

You may know the concept of life force as Chi, Élan vital, Gi, Khi, Ki, Manitou, Prana, Ruah, Qi, Vitalism, etc.

In relation to living creatures, this essential energy flows through the body. If it gets blocked, the symptoms of the blockage manifest as illness and/or pain. In other words, it is the blockage of energy which causes any sickness you have. That sickness may be physical, mental, emotional, etc.

You can prevent and reduce sickness by releasing the blockage. The simplest way to encourage and maintain the flow of this energy through the body is the breath.

Every breath circulates life force through the body, but taking full breaths is best. Unfortunately, most people do not take full breaths. Take the time to concentrate on proper breathing. Doing so will promote better breathing even when you are not concentrating on it.

If you only want to do one thing a day to maintain your health, do conscious breathing.

3-Part Breath

This is the breath to do when practicing yoga, but when first learning it, do it from a sitting or lying position.

Breathe in long and deep through your nose. Feel it enter your lower belly, then your lower chest/rib cage, and finally into your lower throat/top of the sternum. Feel the clear, positive energies of happiness and love come up from your toes to your head.

When you are ready, exhale fully through your nose. Feel it leave in the opposite order it came in, i.e., first from your sternum, then your chest, and finally your belly. Release all negative energy and tension out of your body from your head to your toes.

Continue to breathe in and out like this, smooth and continuous.

When you first start to practice this type of breathing it may help to put your hands on each of the three areas as you do it. Belly, chest, and sternum. You can also try breathing into each area on its own.

Alternate Nostril Breathing

Alternate nostril breathing is in some of the curing yoga sequences. It is a quick and easy way to calm your nervous system and raise your happiness. It also helps clear congestion.

Sit tall and comfortable.

Curl down your middle and index fingers of your right hand into your palm.

Press your right ring finger on your left nostril to close it and breathe in until the count of four.

Now use your thumb to close off your right nostril so you close both your nostrils. Count to four.

Release your ring finger and breathe out through your left nostril to the count of four.

Repeat this same sequence but now breathe in through your right nostril.

Continue this alternation for 3 to 5 minutes.

Beginner Yoga Poses for Flexibility

This part of the article will explain how to do each pose in the routine. They are in the order you do them.

To do this basic yoga routine in 10-15 minutes, hold each pose for 10 seconds. It is about 2 deep breaths.

Once you are familiar with the poses, it will be easiest to use the free Yoga Routine Quick Sheet. You can get it by joining the newsletter. Scroll to the top of this page to do that.

Mountain Pose

Avoid doing mountain pose if you have a shoulder injury.

Stand with your feet parallel and either together or hip width apart.

Spread your toes wide and balance your weight evenly and centered over each foot.

Pull up your kneecaps and tense your thighs. Keep your legs straight but do not lock your knees.
Ensure your hips are directly over your ankles.

As you inhale, lengthen your spine so that the crown of your head goes straight up towards the sky.

When you exhale drop your shoulders and lengthen your finger-tips towards the ground. Keep extending your head upwards.

At the same time gently direct your chest straight ahead.

1 Mountain, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength0

While continuing to lengthen, inhale and bring your arms up above your head. Reach for the sky, palms facing each other.

As you exhale relax your shoulders but continue to lengthen your crown and fingers to the sky.

You could also interlace your fingers with your index fingers pointing up.

1 Mountain, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength1

When you are ready, exhale and bring your palms together in front of your chest in a prayer position.

Take a breath and on the exhale allow your hands to drop to your sides.

1 Mountain, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength2

Standing Backbend

Avoid doing standing back bends if you have a back, hip, and/or neck injury.

As you breathe in place the palms of your hands on your lower back (sacrum) with your fingers pointing to the ground.

Squeeze your buttocks and thighs tight, pull up your kneecaps, and press into your feet.

Exhale and press your hips forward as you arch your back.

You can either look straight ahead or allow your head to drop all the way back.

Increase the stretch by walking your hands down the back of your legs.

2 Standing Backbend, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

When you are ready, slowly come back to a standing position with your hands by your sides.

Crescent Moon Pose

Avoid doing crescent moon pose if you have a back, hip, and/or shoulder injury.

While inhaling adopt mountain pose. Interlace your fingers and point your index fingers to the sky.

As you exhale press your left hip out to the side and arch to your right.

Keep your body strong and lengthened.

Inhale as you return to the position with your fingers interlaced and pointing to the sky. Repeat it on your other side.

3 Crescent Moon, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

Return to mountain pose.

In curing yoga, crescent moon pose can help with:

  • Balance
  • Digestion
  • Flexibility
  • Relaxation
  • Weight loss

Standing Forward Fold

Avoid doing standing forward folds if you have a back, hip, leg, and/or shoulder injury.

Exhale and bring your head to your knees with your palms flat on the floor.

Stretch your spine by pulling your head down while pushing your hips up.

Bend your knees if you need to but aim to be able to do it with straight legs.

Press your belly into your thighs when inhaling.

For a deeper stretch hold the back of your calves and pull your head closer to your legs.

4 Standing Forward Fold, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

You can make it easier by spreading your legs apart a little.

Stand back in mountain pose when you are ready.

In curing yoga, standing forward fold can help with:

  • Anxiety
  • Asthma
  • Backaches
  • Circulation
  • Cold and flu
  • Complexion
  • Constipation
  • Depression
  • Digestion
  • Energy
  • Flexibility
  • Headaches
  • Migraines
  • High blood pressure
  • Immunity
  • Indigestion
  • Insomnia
  • Knee problems
  • Menopause
  • Menstruation
  • Posture
  • Prolapsed uterus
  • Relaxation
  • Stress
  • Varicose veins
  • Weight loss

Table Pose

Avoid doing table pose if you have a knee and/or wrist injury.

As you inhale, place your hands and knees on the floor with your palms underneath your shoulders. Your fingers face forwards.

Ensure your knees are shoulder width apart and your feet are behind them. The tops of your feet and your toes are on the floor.

Look at the ground between your hands and press down into your palms.

Have your back flat and exhale while lengthening your spine. Lengthen your spine by pressing the crown of your head forward and your tailbone back.

5 Table Pose, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

In curing yoga, table pose can help with:

  • Aches and pains
  • Arthritis
  • Backaches
  • Flexibility
  • Hangovers
  • Knee problems
  • Menstruation
  • General strength
  • Stress
  • Varicose veins
  • Weight loss

Threading the Needle

Avoid doing threading the needle pose if you have a knee, neck, and/or shoulder injury.

As you exhale slide your right hand between your left knee and left hand. Do it until your right shoulder and the side of your head are resting on the floor.

Inhale and reach towards the sky with your left hand.

Find where you get the deepest stretch and stay there, reaching out through your fingers.

6 Threading the Needle, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

When ready exhale as you bring your hand back to the floor and then inhale to readopt table pose.

Repeat the pose on your left side.

In curing yoga, threading the needle pose can help with:

  • Aches and pains
  • Anxiety
  • Arthritis
  • Backaches
  • Flexibility
  • Menstruation
  • Stress

Low Warrior

Avoid doing low warrior pose if you have an ankle, arm, hip, and/or shoulder injury.

Step your right foot forward placing it in-between your hands. Your knee is over your ankle.

Ensure your left knee, and your left and right feet are firm with the ground and then place your hands on your right knee.

Straighten your arms and bring your torso back. Do not lock your elbows.

Relax your shoulders. Stick your chest out by bringing your shoulder blades towards each other.

As you inhale, raise your arms over your head with your palms facing each other and arch your back as you look up to the sky.

If this is difficult then you can keep your hands on your bent knee.

7, Low Warrior Pose, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

When ready exhale as you bring your palms back to the floor on either side of your right foot.

In curing yoga, low warrior pose can help with:

  • Circulation
  • Depression
  • Self-esteem
  • Respiratory ailments
  • Sciatica
  • Energy levels
  • Flexibility
  • Relaxation
  • Weight loss

Half Prayer Twist

Avoid doing half prayer twist if you have a back, hip, knee, and/or shoulder injury.

As you inhale bring your torso up and place your hands together in a prayer position.

Place your right elbow to the outside of your left knee and use your arms to press your right shoulder up and back. Feel it twist your upper back.

Ensure your palms remain in the center of your chest. Point your fingers towards your throat.

You can either look straight ahead or up towards the sky.

8 Half Prayer Twist, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

When ready exhale as you bring your palms back to the floor, one on each side of your right foot.

In curing yoga, half prayer twist can help with:

  • Balance
  • Depression
  • Hangover
  • Hot flashes
  • Indigestion
  • Sciatica
  • Energy
  • Flexibility
  • Weight loss

Half Pyramid

Avoid doing half pyramid pose if you have a knee, and/or leg injury.

While exhaling, straighten your right leg as you press your hips back towards your left heel.

Round your spine and lift your toes to the sky as you push your forehead to your right knee.

Walk your hands back towards you to support your torso.

Relax your elbows, face, neck, and shoulders.

9, Half Pyramid, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

When ready inhale and bend your right knee back over your ankle. Then exhale and bring your right knee back into table pose.

In curing yoga, half pyramid pose can help with foot cramping, hot flashes, and shin splints.

*Do low Warrior, half prayer twist, and half pyramid on your other side*

Extended Dog Pose

Avoid doing extended dog pose if you have an arm, back, knee, and/or shoulder injury.

As you inhale push your tailbone towards the sky. Exhale and lower your forehead to the floor by sliding your hands forward. Ensure you keep your hips lifted over your knees.

Arch the middle of your back by allowing your chest to sink.

To deepen the stretch, straighten your arms, lift your elbows off the floor, and bring your hips back. Try not to let your hands slide while you do this.

Place your chin on the ground to stretch your neck.

10, Extended Dog, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

When ready, inhale and return to the table pose.

In curing yoga, extended dog pose can help with relaxation, weight loss, and more.

Hero Pose

Avoid doing hero pose if you have a knee injury.

Kneel on the ground with your knees together and your feet hip-width apart. Sit with your bum on the ground and your heels on the outside of your hips.

If this is too difficult you can sit on your heels.

Place your hands on your knees. Your palms can face up or down.

Lengthen your torso by reaching the crown of your head to the sky.

Push your lower legs into the ground, drop your shoulders, and press your chest forward.

Relax your belly, face, jaw, and tongue.

11, Hero Pose, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

In curing yoga, hero pose can help with:

  • Anxiety
  • Asthma
  • Backaches
  • Cold and flu
  • Depression
  • Detox
  • Diarrhea
  • Foot-cramps
  • Hangovers
  • Headaches
  • Indigestion
  • Knee problems
  • Menopause
  • Menstruation
  • Migraines
  • Prolapsed uterus
  • Self-esteem
  • Shin splints
  • Stress
  • Tense neck and shoulders
  • Vertigo/dizzy spells

Hero pose is also an excellent pose to rest and/or for meditation.

Lion Pose

Avoid doing lion pose if you have a face, knee, neck, and/or tongue injury.

From hero pose, bring your feet together and spread your knees as wide as you can without straining. Sit on your heels.

Inhale and lengthen your spine by reaching the crown of your head to the sky.

Bring your palms to the floor between your knees with your fingers facing your body.

Arch your spine, stick your tongue out and exhale via your mouth. Be ferocious like a lion!

12, Lion Pose, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

Repeat this a few times and then return to hero pose.

In curing yoga, lion pose can help with complexion, self-esteem, and flexibility.

Downward Facing Frog

Avoid doing downward facing frog if you have a knee, hip, and/or leg injury.

Spread your knees as wide as you can without hurting yourself. Align your feet so that they are behind your knees, i.e. right foot behind right knee and left foot behind left knee.

Turn your feet outwards so your toes are facing away from your body.

Place your elbows, forearms, and palms flat on the floor.

Exhale as you push your hips back.

13, Downward Facing Frog, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

When ready, return to hero pose.

Staff

Move into a seated position with your legs extended straight out in front of you.

Place your hands beside your hips with your fingers pointed forward.

Lengthen your spine by pressing your hip bones down whilst pushing the crown of your head up.

Use your arms for support as you push your chest forward and lower your shoulders.

Pull your toes towards your head as you push your heels away from you.

14, Staff Pose, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

In curing yoga, staff pose can help with:

  • Asthma
  • Cold and flu
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Flexibility
  • Headaches
  • Insomnia
  • Menopause
  • Migraines
  • Weight loss

Seated Forward Bend

Avoid doing a seated forward bend if you have an ankle, arm, hip, and/or shoulder injury.

From staff pose, inhale and raise your arms up to the sky with your palms facing each other. Lengthen your torso through your fingers and the crown of your head.

As you exhale bend at the hips, lowering your upper body to your legs. Grab your ankles, feet, or toes.
Push out through your heels as you pull your toes back towards you.

You can use your arms to pull yourself closer to your legs. For those with more flexibility reach your hands in front of your feet.

If you are having difficulties bend your knees enough so you can reach your feet and place your head on your knees.

15, Seated Forward Bend, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

When you are ready slowly roll up your spine back into staff pose.

In curing yoga, seated forward bend can help with:

  • Anxiety
  • Constipation
  • Craving and addiction
  • Depression
  • Energy
  • Flexibility
  • Headaches
  • Migraines
  • Insomnia
  • Knee problems
  • Menopause
  • Menstruation
  • Relaxation
  • Stress
  • Weight loss

Bound Angle

Avoid doing bound angle pose if you have a hip and/or knee injury.

Bend your legs to bring the bottoms of your feet together. Your knees bend facing out.

Hold onto your toes by interlacing your fingers around them.

As you inhale stretch the crown of your head up towards the sky while pushing your hips down.

Push your chest forward and relax your shoulders down.

Close your eyes and look to your third eye (behind the middle of your forehead).

As you exhale push your knees to the ground and gently pull your torso forward. Ensure to keep your chest open and back flat.

16, Bound Angle Pose, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan0

For a deeper stretch, pull your forehead or chest towards your feet.

16, Bound Angle Pose, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan1

When you’re ready, return to staff pose.

In curing yoga, bound angle pose can help with:

  • Aches and pains
  • Anxiety
  • Asthma
  • Back-ache
  • Cold and flu
  • Depression
  • Diarrhea
  • Energy
  • Flexibility
  • Headache
  • Migraine
  • Hip discomfort
  • Indigestion
  • Insomnia
  • Knee problems
  • Menopause
  • Menstruation
  • Prolapsed uterus
  • Relaxation
  • Sciatica
  • Stress
  • Thyroid imbalance
  • Weight loss

Seated Angle

Avoid doing seated angle pose if you have an arm, hip, knee, and/or shoulder injury.

As you inhale spread your legs out as wide as comfortable. Ensure your knees and toes are pointing up and reach through your fingers up to the sky.

Exhale as you lower your palms to the floor. Deepen the stretch by walking your hands forward. Stay focused on keeping your spine long.

You could also hold your big toes and use them to help pull your torso down.

17, Seated Angle Pose, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

When ready, inhale and slowly walk your hands in as your roll back your spine. Finish with a straight back.

In curing yoga, seated angle pose can help with:

  • Asthma
  • Cravings and addictions
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Headache
  • Migraine
  • Hip discomfort
  • Knee problems
  • Menopause
  • Menstruation
  • Pregnancy
  • Sciatica
  • Vertigo/dizziness
  • Flexibility
  • Relaxation
  • Weight loss

Side Seated Angle

Avoid doing side seated angle pose if you have a hip, leg, and/or lower back injury.

Turn to face your right foot by twisting at your waist.

Walk your hands towards your right foot as you exhale. Try to reach your forehead to your knee and hold your right ankle or foot if you are able.

Relax your shoulders and neck. Increase the stretch by pressing your heel out while pulling your toes back.

18, Side Seated Angle Pose, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

When ready, return to the center with your back straight and then do the same thing on your left side.

Go back to seated angle, then to staff pose, and lie flat on your back.

Joyful Baby Pose

Avoid doing joyful baby pose if you have a leg, neck, and/or shoulder injury.

As you inhale bring your knees to your chest.

Weave your arms through the inside of your knees. Hold onto the pinkie toe side edges of your feet with your hands.

Keep your head on the ground and tuck your chin to your chest.

Push your heels up to the sky as you pull back with your arms. At the same time press the back of your neck, shoulders, sacrum, and tailbone to the floor.

Open your legs wider for a deeper hip stretch.

19, Joyful Baby Pose, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

When you’re ready, exhale and slowly roll your spine back to the ground until you are lying flat again.

In curing yoga, joyful baby pose can help with:

  • Fibromyalgia
  • Flexibility
  • Insomnia
  • Lethargy
  • Pregnancy

Wind Relieving Pose

Avoid doing wind relieving pose if have a hernia and/or have had recent abdominal surgery.

As you inhale bring both knees up to your chest. Hug your knees and hold onto your opposite elbows, forearms, fingers, or wrists.

Keep your head on the floor whilst tucking your chin to your chest.

Pull your knees to your chest as you press the back of your neck, shoulders, sacrum, and tailbone to the floor.

Relax your feet, hips, and legs.

Inhale deep into your belly and press it against your thighs as you do so.

20, Wind Relieving Pose, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

When ready exhale and relax all your limbs to the ground so you are lying flat again.

In curing yoga, wind relieving pose can help with:

  • Anxiety
  • Back-ache
  • Circulation
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Flexibility
  • Hip discomfort
  • Immunity
  • Knee problems
  • Lethargy
  • Menstruation
  • Relaxation
  • Runner’s aches
  • Sciatica
  • Stomach ache
  • Stress
  • Varicose veins
  • Weight loss

Supine Bound Angle

Avoid doing supine bound angle pose if you have a hip and/or shoulder injury.

Bend your legs to bring the bottoms of your feet together. Your knees bend facing out like with bound angle pose but lying down.

Allow your knees to drop to the ground. You can rest your hands on your thighs to “encourage” them but do not push down.

As you inhale slide your arms on the ground over your head until your palms are together. Cross your thumbs.

21, Supine Bound Angle, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

When ready exhale as you return to a lying position.

In curing yoga, supine bound angle pose can help with:

  • Back-ache
  • Circulation
  • Constipation
  • Flexibility
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Hip discomfort
  • Immunity
  • Knee problems
  • Lethargy
  • Menstruation
  • Relaxation
  • Runner’s aches
  • Sciatica
  • Stomach ache
  • Stress and anxiety
  • Varicose veins
  • Weight loss

Corpse Pose (Shavasana)

In the last few poses you are lying flat on your back. This is corpse pose. Now you will do it properly.

Lie flat on your back on the floor. You can place a pillow under your head if you want.

Keep your head straight, i.e., don’t let it fall to the side.

Draw your shoulder blades down and open your chest towards your chin.

Have your arms at a comfortable distance from your body with your palms facing up. Completely relax your arms and fingers.

22, Corpse, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

Lift and extend your buttocks to your heels so that your whole sacrum rests on the floor.
Keep your abdomen soft and relaxed.

Slowly stretch your legs out straight one at the time. Allow them to roll out to the side from the hips to the feet. Check that your body is in a straight line and you are resting evenly on the left and right sides.

Once you are comfortable stay still and quiet. Be aware of your body relaxing deeper into the floor.

Allow your eyes to rest completely so they sink deeper towards the back of the skull. Relax your whole face and body.

Be aware of your breath, quiet and soft.

Now is the perfect time to do yoga nidra or some other meditation.

Picture of All Yoga Poses in Sequence

Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan Yoga Training

How to do Yoga Nidra

Yoga Nidra is a form of guided meditation which has many health benefits. Yoga Nidra is my favorite form of meditation because it is easy to do, especially for beginners. For those of you that use other forms of mediation that you enjoy then feel free to stick to them. The main thing is the meditation.

You can guide yourself through yoga nidra but the easiest way to do it is to listen to a yoga nidra practice. You only need to do what the instructor says.

It is good to do AT LEAST 10 minutes of yoga nidra immediately following the yoga stretch routine.

Find a place where your body can be comfortable and you can practice undisturbed. Not too hot or cold. Put on some soothing background music if you want.

It is best not to do yoga nidra in bed because you will be more likely to fall asleep. A yoga mat on the floor is ideal.

Yoga nidra is a conscious practice.

Lie in Corpse Pose

Corpse pose is at the end of almost every yoga practice. Going straight from your yoga practice to yoga nidra is ideal.

You can also do yoga nidra from a seated position if lying down is inappropriate.

Close your eyes.

22, Corpse, Beginner Yoga for Flexibility and Strength, Survival Fitness Plan

Notice your Breath

Notice your breathing. Feel your lungs filling with air, your stomach expanding, and then deflating.

Imagine a light around your body expanding and contracting as you breathe in and out.

Feel the energy coursing through your body.

Use Your Senses

Notice each of your senses, one by one.

What sounds do you hear? Near, far, inside, outside.

What smells can you smell? Take small sniffs, like a dog does.

Taste the air.

Feel your body supported on the floor. Which parts of your body are touching?

What can you see with your eyes closed? Does the light make shapes in your eyelids?

Repeat Your Mantra

Your mantra is a short sentence stating your intentions. It’s kind of like an affirmation. It may be a broad statement such as overall health or relaxation. It could also be a visualization of something you want to achieve.

Whatever it is, repeat it mentally three times. Try to feel how it feels as if it was true.

One I use often is “My entire being is completely relaxed and at one with the universe.”

Scan Your Body

This is where you consciously relax each part of your body.

Mentally go through your body. Bring your attention to and relax each part. You can be very detailed about this or only do large areas. It depends on how long you want to spend.

I start from the top of my head and work my way down. Sometimes I even do internal organs.

After you have relaxed smaller body parts relax them as a whole. For example, shoulder, upper arm, bicep, elbow, forearm, hand, fingers, relax the whole arm.

At the end relax the whole body as one.

Awaken the Body

The last step is to deepen your breath and start to move your fingers and toes, then your hands and feet.

In your own time stretch your body out in whatever way feels right. Open your eyes when you are ready.
When you finish stretching, gently hug your knees. It is wind relieving pose. Fall to your right side and then gently sit up.

Take a moment to reflect on the practice and then go about your day.

Yoga Nidra Playlist

Here’s a playlist of the three ten minute videos which I use to do my daily yoga nidra.

Note: 10 minutes is very short for Yoga Nidra. None of these ten-minute yoga nidra practices go through all the steps above. If you can spare the extra time, download some very good yoga nidra practices for free at YogaNidraNetwork.org/downloads. There are also some shorter ones which I use in the mornings.

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Beginner Yoga Routine for Flexibility and Strength Conclusion

A 15-minute yoga routine is quite short. The longer you do this simple yoga routine the better. You can make it longer by extending the time you stay in each pose. The longer you stay in each pose, the more your flexibility will improve.

Don’t forget to use correct breathing techniques while doing the poses. Also, do yoga nidra or some other type of meditation at the end.

If you want to learn more about how yoga can help cure different ailments, check out Curing Yoga by Aventuras De Viaje.

Did you find this beginner yoga flexibility and strength routine useful? If so, please share it with your friends.

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Cold Water Survival, Rescue, and First Aid http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/dress-cold-water-survival/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/dress-cold-water-survival/#respond Sun, 15 Jul 2018 03:01:19 +0000 https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=16166 In this article, you will learn how to survive cold water. It covers prevention and specific action steps for surviving cold water once immersed. There is also information on cold water rescue and first aid for common cold water illnesses. Although the focus is on cold water survival, a lot of this information applies to
Read more

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In this article, you will learn how to survive cold water. It covers prevention and specific action steps for surviving cold water once immersed. There is also information on cold water rescue and first aid for common cold water illnesses.

Although the focus is on cold water survival, a lot of this information applies to the cold in general.

IMPORTANT: This article is for reference only. Please never attempt cold water survival training without a professional instructor.

Contents

  • Prevention
    • How to Dress for Cold Water Survival
      • Layering
      • Footwear
      • Goggles
      • Poncho
      • Visibility
      • Maintenance
      • Restrictions
  • How Long Can You Survive in Cold Water
    • Cold Water Survival 1 10 1 Rule
    • Survival Time in Cold Water Chart
    • Cold Water Drowning Survival Record
  • How to Survive in Cold Water
    • HELP Position in Swimming
    • Huddle Position in Swimming
    • How to Escape Ice Water
  • Cold Water Rescue
  • Cold Water First Aid
    • Hypothermia
    • Drowning
    • Frostbite
  • Conclusion

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Cold Water Survival

Prevention

As always, prevention is the best form of survival. The obvious one would be to stay out of cold water. But if your job requires it, or you enjoy water sports, that may not be an option. And there is always the possibility of an accident. In these cases, knowledge is the next best thing, in which case, you have come to the right place.

C.O.L.D. is an acronym you can use to help you remember the prevention techniques for cold illnesses.

  • Cover your extremities, i.e., head, hands (mittens work better than gloves) and feet.
  • Overexertion will cause you to sweat. This will make your clothes wet, which will make you colder.
  • Layering. Layers of loose fitting, lightweight clothing is a good way to insulate your body. Wool and silk for inner layers are better than cotton.
  • Dry. Keep as dry as you can.

Other cold water immersion prevention tips include:

  • Enter cold water slowly, keeping the head above the water
  • Wear a PFD. They will help keep the head above water, and they also provide warmth. Look here for the best PFD’s.

How to Dress for Cold Water Survival

If you know you will be in or around cold water, then dressing for the occasion can save your life in case of an accident. Also, being hot outside does not mean it will be warm in the water. It only takes a slight change in weather to take the situation from fun to dangerous.

  • Be prepared with the right clothing and use layering.
  • Choose fabrics that provide warmth even when wet. Not cotton or jeans.
  • In colder conditions, use a wetsuit.
  • Once out of the water, put on warm clothes. Use clothing that blocks the wind, such as a poncho.

If you know you will be entering cold water, use a cold water survival suit. Look here for the best cold water wetsuit.

Layering

Layering means using several items of thin clothing as opposed to one or two thick ones. If you get too warm you can strip one or two layers without losing all your protection.

There are 3 basic layers. Base, insulator, and outer.

Base Layer
The first layer, (base layer), will reduce water flowing past your skin and is also good for sun protection. You want a skin-tight, quick-drying material that will wick the water away. Rash vests are a good example. Polypropylene, polyester, and lycra are good materials for your base layer. Look here for the best base layers.

Insulating Layer
The insulating layer keeps you warm when it gets colder. It should fit snug. Not too tight or too loose. Use materials that dry fast. Unlined tracksuits work well, as does wool and fleece. Unlined is important, otherwise, it will hold air and water. A hooded top helps to prevent heat from escaping through your head. It also provides sun protection.

Adjust the number of insulating layers you use depending on the temperature. In warmer climates, you may not even need one.

Outer Layer
Your outer layer should be a water and windproof shell. Its purpose is to keep you warm and the elements (such as wind and rain) out. You will still get wet, either from perspiration or from being in the water.

A rain jacket, an anorak or a light nylon over-all works well. It should be large enough so you have good freedom of movement. This will also trap a warm layer of air inside it.

Being windproof is very important for the outer layer. Look here for the best outer layers.

Footwear

Footwear is especially important in unknown waters where your feet may get injured. Simple canvas shoes with drain holes work well. Wear ones that are easy to remove in case you get caught in rocks.

Wearing socks provides insulation and also prevents chafing.

Swimming in footwear, as with any clothing, will create extra drag. Experiment with it during training.

Goggles

Swimming goggles, or a mask, are not essential but are useful if you want to see underwater.

It is a good idea to always wear goggles in a chlorinated/chemical pool. Look here for the best swimming goggles.

Poncho

A poncho is an excellent all-around piece of survival equipment. When it comes to water training, you will use ponchos for some self-rescue exercises. It can also become an improvised shelter or emergency blanket (extra warmth) when not in the water. Look here for the best ponchos.

Visibility

Being visible in the water is for safety and survival. You want to be easy to spot by any water traffic. Also, if you get in trouble you will be easier to find by rescue services.

Maintenance

Always wash yourself and all your gear in fresh water after training in any type of water. This will keep everything in the best working condition for as long as possible.

Rinsing your gear under a tap is not enough. Most of the bad stuff (salt, chemicals, etc.) will not get washed out. It is best to wear it in the shower or put it in the washing machine.

Restrictions

The more clothes you have on the harder it will be to swim. The best way to prepare is to simulate falling into the water while clothed and then swimming to safety.

Water-logged clothes will also make climbing out of the water harder.

How Long Can You Survive in Cold Water

Can cold water kill you? Yes it can, and in more ways than one.

Drowning and hypothermia are the obvious killers. Cold water and heart attacks happen due to vasoconstriction. Cold water and asthma is also a concern since cold in general can be a trigger. Treatments for some of these cold water illnesses are later on in this article.

Cold Water Survival 1 10 1 Rule

The cold water survival 1 10 1 rule states how long each stage of cold water immersion takes for the average human. Cold water immersion does not lead to immediate hypothermia. There are 4 phases:

Cold Shock Response
This is the most common cause of drowning in cold water. It can cause a few life-threatening conditions:

  • Gasp Reflex. When cold water is first entered it causes an automatic gasp reflex. This reflex usually lasts about 1 minute, but if the head is under water at the time, it will lead to drowning.
  • Hyperventilation. Panic can cause hyperventilation which can lead to fainting. This can lead to drowning.
  • Cardiac Arrest. Vasoconstriction (narrowing of the arteries) means the heart must work harder.

Cold Incapacitation
Prolonged vasoconstriction will cause the extremities to ‘shut down’. This means the limbs will not be able to help keep the body afloat. This happens after about 10 minutes in the water.

Hypothermia
Hypothermia will set in after about 30 minutes in ice water for most adults. For the 1 – 10 – 1 rule the say being in cold water 1 hour is the onset of hypothermia.

Circum-rescue Collapse
This is not part of the 1 – 10 – 1 rule but is important to understand. When a patient knows they are being rescued, their mental state relaxes. Blood pressure drops, muscles fail and it may even cause cardiac arrest. It can happen before, during, or after the rescue.

Survival Time in Cold Water Chart

This cold water survival chart gives a bit more detail for cold water survival times.

how long can you survive in cold water chart, Cold Water Survival, Rescue, and First Aid, Survival Fitness Plan

Cold Water Drowning Survival Record

There have been a few cases where people have been underwater for long periods of time and survived. A quick google search revealed, amongst others, a story of a boy that was underwater for 42 minutes. Another was a child that was revived almost 2 hours after drowning.

In both cases, the experts said that their survival was most likely due to youth and that they fell in cold water. I won’t go into the scientific details of why cold water helped them survive, but I do bring this up for a reason.

People may seem dead, but there is still hope. Never give up on a cold water drowning victim (or any drowning victim) until announced dead by a physician. In Norway, there is a recorded cold water drowning survival time of close to 7 hours!

How to Survive in Cold Water

Being immersed in cold water will sap your breath and energy quicker than normal. Panicking will make things worse. You must relax and get out. Concentrate on deep breathing to calm your mind and body.

If you cannot get on dry land you have to do whatever you can to keep your body heat until help arrives.

  • Button or zip up your clothes and keep them on
  • Don’t use up energy swimming unless you have a dry place to swim to
  • Get as much of yourself out of the water as possible
  • Use the HELP or Huddle position

Once you get out of the water it is important to remove all your wet clothing, dry yourself off, and get warm. Watch yourself and others for signs of hypothermia and treat as necessary.

HELP Position in Swimming

HELP is an acronym for the Heat Escape Lessening Posture. It is the position to adopt when you are alone in the water and want to conserve your body heat.

The general idea of the HELP position is to protect your major areas of heat loss. These are your armpits, groin, head, neck, and rib cage.

When you are wearing a life-jacket, keep your head out of the water and lean back on it. Fold your arms and hug your jacket close to your body.

Cross your lower legs and bring your knees as high on your chest as you can.

1 The HELP and Huddle Positions for Cold Water Survival, Survival Fitness Plan Water Survival Training

If you do not have a life jacket, do your best to get as close to the HELP position as possible.

Huddle Position in Swimming

The huddle position is the HELP position for groups of people (2+). Huddling together in a group has benefits such as:

  • Lessen loss of body heat
  • Increase morale
  • Be easier to spot for rescuers
  • Stronger swimmers can aid weaker ones

To adopt the huddle position form a ring and group together. Everyone groups together as close as possible. Use your arms and legs to wrap around each other. Place those in need (such as children) in the middle.

2 The HELP and Huddle Positions for Cold Water Survival, Survival Fitness Plan Water Survival Training

How to Escape Ice Water

Escaping from a fall into ice water is not easy and the result can be deadly.

DO NOT PRACTICE THIS IN ICE WATER! Go through the motions in a pool instead.

When you first fall into ice water you will start to hyperventilate. Try to stay calm and keep your head above the water. Taking deep breathes may help but do not breathe in the water.

After 1 to 3 minutes the shock response will begin to wear off. Now you have about 10 minutes to get out before you fall unconscious.

Once you have got your hyperventilation under control, find where you first fell in. You want to get out where you know it was strong enough to support your weight. Going to where you came from is your best bet.

Place your hands on the surface and pull yourself up while staying as horizontal as possible. Pulling yourself straight up will be far less effective and a waste of energy.

1 How to Escape Falling Through Ice, Survival Fitness Plan Cold Water Survival Training

Kick your legs as your creep yourself out of the water. It will be very slippery.

2 How to Escape Falling Through Ice, Survival Fitness Plan Cold Water Survival Training

Once you are out of the water, lie flat on the ice and roll away.

3 How to Escape Falling Through Ice, Survival Fitness Plan Cold Water Survival Training

Rolling away keeps your weight distributed. It has less of a chance of creating further cracks in the ice.

4 How to Escape Falling Through Ice, Survival Fitness Plan Cold Water Survival Training

If you know you will be crossing ice country it is very wise to get some ice picks. They will make it far easier to pull yourself out of the water, although it will still be difficult.

If you cannot get out, then you need to conserve your heat and energy. Put your arms on the ice and keep them there so they freeze to the surface. This way, when you become unconscious you will have a better chance of not falling into the water.

5 How to Escape Falling Through Ice, Survival Fitness Plan Cold Water Survival Training

Never go out to someone who has fallen into ice. Coach them on what to do from a safe distance and reach something out for them to hold onto such as a stick or rope.

6 How to Escape Falling Through Ice, Survival Fitness Plan Cold Water Survival Training

Once out of the water get out of the wet clothes and get warm as soon as possible.

Escaping Ice Water Video

Cold Water Rescue

If rescuing someone from cold water immersion:

  • Only enter water to rescue if no other option
  • Extract from water slowly
  • Use in-water rescue breathing if needed
  • Treat critical systems as needed, e.g., CPR, hypothermia
  • Start with 5 rescue breaths, and then continue as normal
  • If patient is breathing but unconscious, put on his/her side

If you think you may need to rescue someone from cold water, invest in a cold water rescue suit. The Stearns cold water rescue suit is a good choice. Look here for the best prices.

Cold Water First Aid

In this section, we will cover the first aid procedures in the case of cold water immersion.

Most of what is here is not only for cold water cases. You can use the same steps for general treatment also.

Hypothermia

Hypothermia occurs when the cold overwhelms the body’s ability to produce and keep heat. It usually occurs when exposed to the cold.

Symptoms of Hypothermia
Hypothermia can be mild or severe and it progresses through very definite symptoms. The patient will have mild hypothermia and, if untreated, it will become severe.

Symptoms of Mild Hypothermia
The first symptoms of hypothermia are:

  • Body temperature between 35.5 °C (96 °F) to 32 °C (90 °F)
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Intense shivering
  • Irritable
  • Lethargic
  • Loss of fine motor coordination
  • Sluggish thinking
  • Violent shivering
  • Withdrawn

Symptoms of Severe Hypothermia

  • Body temperature below 32 °C (90 °F)
  • Blue, puffy skin
  • Coma
  • Decreased vital signs (pulse, respiratory, B/P)
  • Jerky movements
  • Muscular rigidity, i.e., no more shivering
  • Respiratory and cardiac failure

Hypothermia Treatment

  • The treatment whether mild or severe is basically the same. The earlier you treat it the better
  • Cover the top of the head
  • Do not rub or massage extremities (in case of frostbite)
  • Heat packs on armpits, chest, groin and neck
  • Insulate from below and above, starting from the ground up
  • Increase heat production, i.e., exercise

Note: Only exercise after the patient has an improved mental status. Ensure he has had enough food and fluids.

  • Remove causes, e.g., exit cold water, block the wind, remove wet layers
  • Warm, non-alcoholic and non-caffeinated liquid (only if patient is capable)
  • Immersion heating, e.g., a warm bath. Only if in a controlled environment; the possibility of after-chill may make it worse

Skin-to-skin rewarming inside of a sleeping bag (or similar) is a survival technique. The problem is that it may cause the body-temperatures of all involved to drop.

Hypothermia Packaging
Hypothermia packaging is useful when you need to transport the patient. Even if you don’t need to move the patient, it is a great way to keep him/her warm.

  • Ensure the patient is dry
  • Keep patient horizontal
  • Stabilize any injuries, including covering any open wounds
  • Sandwich the patient between layers of insulation and waterproof layers

Suggested Hypothermia Packaging

  • The face should be partially covered, but allow for breathing, monitoring etc.
  • Place a large plastic sheet on the ground
  • Next, place an insulated sleeping pad
  • On the pad place a sleeping bag (or blankets or whatever you have)
  • The patient goes on top of this, along with heating bottles, IV’s etc.
  • Fold tops and bottom over the patient, then fold the corners over
  • Fold the sides over, keeping wrinkles to a minimum
  • Strap in place

Hypothermia Packaging, Cold Water Survival, Rescue, and First Aid, Survival Fitness Plan

Drowning First Aid Treatment

There are 3 basic classifications of drowning: Asymptomatic, symptomatic, and respiratory or cardiopulmonary arrest.

Symptoms of Asymptomatic Drowning

  • The is out of the water
  • Alert
  • No respiratory distress
  • With or without coughing

Treatment for Asymptomatic Drowning

  • Watch for respiratory symptoms
  • If respiratory symptoms develop seek advanced medical care ASAP
  • Protect against and assess for hypothermia
  • Patients that do not worsen after 15 minutes are not likely to diminish but should still be monitored

Symptoms of Symptomatic Drowning

  • Patient requires resuscitation or shows signs of distress

Treatment for Symptomatic Drowning

  • Seek advanced medical care

Symptoms of and Treatment for Respiratory or Cardiopulmonary Arrest

  • DRABC
  • If patient is still in the water, only use rescue breathing

First Aid for Frostbite

Frostbite is the freezing of the water in the cells. The most commonly affected areas are the earlobes, nose, fingers, and toes.

Frostnip is a very mild form of frostbite. Frostnip does not do any permanent damage to the skin.

Exposure to the cold is the main cause. Constriction, dehydration, exhaustion, prior cold injuries and vasoconstrictors (coffee) are also contributing factors.

Symptoms of Frostbite
There are 3 levels of frostbite severity: Superficial, partial and severe.

Superficial Frostbite Symptoms

  • Cold and uncomfortable
  • Pink or pale complexion

Partial Thickness Frostbite Symptoms

  • Reduced perfusion (blood flow)
  • Numbness
  • Pale and soft

Treatment for Frostnip, Superficial and Partial Frostbite

Note: Thawing tissue and refreezing it will create more damage. Unless a stable environment is more than 24 hours away, it is best to wait.

  • Do not drink alcohol or smoke
  • Do not massage or rub affected area
  • Elevate extremity
  • General re-warming of whole body
  • Loosen constrictive clothing
  • Maintain food and water intake
  • Re-warm the affected body part with heat packs, skin to skin (do not rub or massage), warm water etc
  • When re-warming, be careful not to burn the patient as he/she may not feel it
  • Analgesics before re-warming

Symptoms of Full Thickness Frostbite

  • Numbness
  • Pale and hard body part
  • Possible ice crystals
  • Perfusion absent

Note: If the skin turns black it has died from a loss of circulation. It is gangrene. Amputation is usually necessary.

First Aid Treatment for Frostbite

  • Immersion of frozen area into 37 to 39 °C (98 to 102 °F) water
  • Dry dressings. Separate digits when bandaging
  • Analgesics before re-warming
  • NSAIDs for circulation

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Conclusion

Surviving in cold water is not easy. Once you get in panic can set in fast which impairs your thinking. Stay calm and get out as fast as possible.

Once on dry land, you can concentrate on surviving cold water illnesses.

If you can’t get out of the water, using the HELP or Huddle position. This will give you the best chance to survive in cold water until rescue arrives.

Did you find this article on survival in cold water useful? If so, please share it with your friends.

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Advanced First Aid Training Online http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/advanced-first-aid-training-online/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/advanced-first-aid-training-online/#respond Fri, 06 Jul 2018 07:01:03 +0000 https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=21330 This online advanced first aid training is for medical emergencies. Use what you learn here in life-threatening cases and/or when you need a “quick fix”. Taking an accredited emergency first aid training course is HIGHLY recommended. It will cover more material and you can’t beat live accredited instructor. Could You Save a Loved One When
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This online advanced first aid training is for medical emergencies. Use what you learn here in life-threatening cases and/or when you need a “quick fix”. Taking an accredited emergency first aid training course is HIGHLY recommended. It will cover more material and you can’t beat live accredited instructor.

Could You Save a Loved One When There are No Doctors Around?
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Advanced Online First Aid Training

Immediate First Aid

This is the 1st of the first aid training levels. They are practical skills for what to do in immediate, life-threatening situations. You should be able to perform these skills without having to reference a field guide or manual. In these situations, seconds count.

The main goal is to keep the patient alive until advanced medical care arrives. It is basic first aid training online.

It also includes how to perform a secondary exam. A secondary exam allows you to anticipate and prevent any further complications.

The following links will take you to the corresponding article.

Diagnosis and Treatments

What follows is the contents of the Diagnosis and Treatments section of Sam Fury’s Wilderness and Travel Medicine. These things are not part of Survival Fitness Plan training so they are not detailed on this website.

These subjects allow you to treat what you discovered during the secondary exam. You do not need to know the information “off-hand”.

If you know of a certain risk, you should memorize the necessary information. For example, if traveling at high altitudes or if bushwalking in hot temperatures.

Due to the large subject matter, I have made the top level categories collapsable. Click on the heading to see all the sub-categories. If it is not collapsed it is because your browser does not support it.

Preliminary Information

Basic Human Anatomy

  • Circulatory System
  • Digestive System
  • Endocrine System
  • Immune System
  • Integumentary System
  • Genitourinary System
  • Musculoskeletal System
  • Nervous System
  • Respiratory System

Prevention Medicine

  • Nutrition
  • Exercise
  • Recharging
  • Personal Hygiene
  • Vaccinations

Medications Guide

  • General Safe Use Information
  • Analgesics, Anti-inflammatory and Fever Reducers
  • Antibiotics
  • Anti-fungals
  • Antihistamines
  • Antiseptics
  • Antiviral Drugs
  • Hemostatic’s
  • High-Altitude Medications
  • Motion Sickness, Nausea and Vomiting
  • Hot Water, Rest, Placebos, and the Will to Live

Moving a Patient

  • Correct Lifting Technique
  • Drags
  • Carries
  • Improvised Litters
  • Improvised Sled

Other

  • Patient Care
  • Advanced First Aid Kit

Open Wounds, Skin Infections and Sepsis

  • Open Wounds
  • Impaling Objects
  • Skin Infection and Sepsis

Environment Induced

Allergic Reactions and Hay-fever

  • Allergic Reactions
  • Hay-Fever

Altitude Induced

  • General Prevention of Altitude Induced Illnesses
  • Acclimatizing to Altitude
  • Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS)
  • HAPE and HACE
  • HAFE
  • High-Altitude Pharyngitis and Bronchitis
  • Peripheral Edema

Animals: Marine

  • Marine Toxins
  • Spiny Injuries
  • Barracuda
  • Blue-Ringed Octopus
  • Bristle-Worm
  • Catfish
  • Conus
  • Coral
  • Jellyfish
  • Leeches
  • Moray Eel
  • Sea Cucumber
  • Sea Lion
  • Sea Snake
  • Sea Urchin
  • Sharks
  • Spine Fish
  • Sponges
  • Stingray
  • Weever Fish

Animals: Terrestrial

  • General Prevention of Animal Attack
  • Ant Bites
  • Bed Bugs
  • Bee/Wasp Sting
  • Caterpillars
  • Cat-Scratch Disease
  • Fleas
  • Insects: General
  • Lice
    • Head Lice
    • Pubic Lice
    • Body Lice
  • Mammalian Bites
    • Rabies
  • Mosquitoes
    • Dengue Fever
    • Japanese Encephalitis
    • Malaria
    • West Nile Virus
    • Yellow Fever
    • Cutaneous Myiasis
  • Mites and Chiggers
    • Chiggers
    • Scabies
  • Porcupines
  • Scorpions
  • Snakes
  • Spider Bite
  • Ticks
    • Lyme Disease
    • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
    • Tick Paralysis

Cold and/or Water-Induced

  • Cold-Water Immersion
  • Drowning
  • Frostbite
  • Hypothermia
  • Saltwater Sores
  • Trench Foot
  • Diving Induced
    • Alternobaric Vertigo
    • Arterial Gas Embolism
    • Contaminated Breathing Gas
    • Decompression Sickness
    • Inner Ear Barotrauma
    • Mask Squeeze
    • Nitrogen Narcosis
    • Hot Tub Folliculitis
    • Pulmonary Barotrauma
    • Sinus Squeeze
    • Tooth Squeeze

Heat and/or Sun Induced

  • General Prevention of Heat-Related Illnesses
  • Burns
  • Heat Edema
  • Heat Exhaustion
  • Heat Rash
  • Heat Stroke
  • Heat Syncope
  • Hyponatremia

Other

  • Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
  • Jet Lag
  • Lightning
  • Radiation Sickness
  • Smoke Inhalation
  • Toxic Plants

Head

Brain

  • Acute Stress Reaction
  • Epidural Hematoma
  • Headaches and Migraines
  • Dehydration Headache
  • Sinus Headache
  • Tension Headaches
  • Migraines
  • Increasing Intracranial Pressure
  • Insomnia
  • Meningitis
  • Seizure
  • Stroke
  • Traumatic Brain Injury

Ears

  • Ear Infections
  • External Otitis
  • Otitis Media
  • Ear Wax
  • Foreign Bodies in the Ear
  • Perforated Eardrum

Eyes

  • Eye Patching
  • Foreign Bodies in the Eye
  • Corneal Abrasion
  • Acute Angle-Closure Glaucoma
  • Conjunctivitis
  • Corneal Erosion
  • Corneal Ulcer
  • Displaced Contact Lens
  • Giant Cell Arteritis
  • Hyphema
  • Impaling Object in the Eye
  • Solar/Ultraviolet Keratitis
  • Stye

Mouth and Teeth
For Any Dental Procedure:

  • Toothache
  • Dental Extraction
  • Avulsion
  • Dry Socket
  • Aphthous Ulcers
  • Broken or Chipped Tooth
  • Cold Sores
  • Condensing Osteitis
  • Dental Abscess
  • Fractured Tooth
  • Gingivitis and Gum Disease
  • Lost Filling
  • Luxation
  • Mandibular Dislocation
  • Myofascial Dysfunction/Pain
  • Thrush
  • Tonsillitis

Nose

  • Broken Nose
  • Foreign Body in the Nose
  • Nosebleed
  • Raw Nose
  • Sinusitis

Circulatory System

Dehydration and Volume Shock

  • Dehydration
  • Volume Shock
  • Rehydration Plan

Diabetic Related Illnesses

  • Hypoglycemia
  • Hyperglycemia

Other

  • Fainting
  • Internal Bleeding

Digestive System

Alcohol Related Illnesses

  • Alcohol Poisoning
  • Hangovers

Diarrhea and Dysentery

  • Diarrhea
  • More Serious than Diarrhea
  • Dysentery

Salmonella, Typhoid Fever and Paratyphoid Fever

  • Salmonellosis
  • Typhoid/Paratyphoid Fever

Other

  • Abdominal Pain
  • Appendicitis
  • Constipation
  • Diverticulitis
  • Food Poisoning
  • Gas
  • Heartburn
  • Hemorrhoids
  • Hepatitis
  • Nausea and Vomiting
  • Peptic Ulcer
  • Worms

Genitourinary System

Pregnancy

  • Delivery
  • Pregnancy Complications
  • Hyperemesis Gravidarum
  • Miscarriage
  • Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension

Sexually Transmitted Infections

  • Chlamydia
  • Genital Herpes
  • Gonorrhea
  • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

Yeast Infection

  • Vaginal Yeast Infection
  • Bacterial Vaginosis

Other

  • Kidney Infection
  • Kidney Stones
  • Prostatitis
  • Tubal Pregnancy
  • Urinary Tract Infections

Integumentary System

Nail Injuries

  • Nail Avulsion
  • Crush Injuries

Other

  • Abscesses
  • Acne
  • Blisters and Hot Spots
  • Bruises
  • Chickenpox
  • Eczema
  • Ingrown Toenail
  • Shingles
  • Splinters and Fishhooks
  • Tinea/Ringworm and Athlete’s Foot

Musculoskeletal System

Musculoskeletal Injuries in General

  • RICES
  • Impaired CSM

Immobilization

  • Collars
  • Mobility Aids
  • Slings
  • Splints
  • Taping

Dislocations

  • Reduction
  • Shoulder Reduction
  • Patella Reduction
  • Digit Reduction
  • Ankle Reduction
  • Elbow Reduction
  • Wrist Reduction
  • Hip Reduction

Fractures

  • Fractured Ribs
  • Flail Chest
  • Fractured Pelvis

Sprains and Strains

  • Sprains
  • Strains

Amputations

  • When to Amputate
  • Where to Amputate
  • Amputation Procedure

Other

  • Backache
  • Pneumothorax
  • Tetanus

Respiratory System

  • Asthma
  • Bronchitis
  • Cold and Flu
  • Dry Cough
  • Pneumonia
  • Sore Throat
  • Strep Throat
  • Whooping Cough

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This online wilderness advanced first aid course only covers a small part of Sam Fury’s book. But it covers the most important parts. The links in the Immediate First Aid section are what will save you and your loved one’s lives.

I want to repeat my earlier advice of taking a live first aid class. All the reading in the world can not compare to professional training. I hope you use the first aid articles on this website as a reference, not an actual training tool.

Did you find this advanced first aid training useful? If so, please share it with your friends.

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Eating for Optimal Health – 5 Basic Nutrition Guidelines http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/nutrition-guidelines/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/nutrition-guidelines/#respond Fri, 06 Jul 2018 03:14:35 +0000 https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=21317 There are a lot of health and fads popping up all the time. But the truth is, good health will only ever be the result of 3 things. Nutrition, exercise, and meditation. This page is about eating for optimal health with 5 basic nutrition guidelines. Survival Fitness Plan nutrition to be exact. It is not
Read more

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There are a lot of health and fads popping up all the time. But the truth is, good health will only ever be the result of 3 things. Nutrition, exercise, and meditation. This page is about eating for optimal health with 5 basic nutrition guidelines. Survival Fitness Plan nutrition to be exact. It is not a “fad diet”. It is a lifestyle of healthy eating, based on the fundamental rule of healthy eating:

“Eat more good stuff, eat less bad stuff.”

Yep, that’s all. Go do it!

Haha, just kidding. For most people, it isn’t so easy. So I have made these 5 daily nutrition guidelines to help you stay on track. It follows the above basic rule and adds some tweaks to boost your diet for optimal health in the simplest way.

5 Healthy Nutrition Guidelines:

  1. Fast for 16 hours a day – adults only
  2. Break your fast with kefir
  3. Eat a plant-based wholefoods diet
  4. Minimise refined sugar
  5. Minimise drug use

The Ultimate Fitness Plan for Escape, Evasion, and Survival
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Eating for Optimal Health – 5 Basic Nutrition Guidelines

1. 16 Hour Fasting

This is intermittent fasting. There are several ways to do it but I find this one way the best because it becomes part of your daily routine. It keeps things simple.

Note: These are good food and nutrition guidelines for adults and children alike, except for this first one. I don’t encourage for children to skip meals. They need the fuel to develop into healthy adults.

The times you choose depends on your lifestyle, as long as it is 16 hours. I like to fast between 8 pm and 12 noon the following day. All I am doing is skipping breakfast.

During the fasting period, you can drink water, herbal tea, or black coffee. If you get hungry try having a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar in a glass of water. A tablespoon of coconut oil is also good. You should consume these two things every day anyway. Both are good for your health.

Intermittent fasting has some great benefits such as:

  • Boosts immune system.
  • Fat loss.
  • Improves longevity.
  • Lowers risk if diabetes.
  • Reduces risk of cancer (non yet proven).
  • Sleep better.
  • Slows aging.
  • Think clearer.

2. Drink Kefir Daily

Kefir is a fermented drink. It is like yogurt but a thinner texture and is very good for your gut health. A healthy gut makes a healthy person! It is also very easy to make.

Drink a glass of kefir every day. Make it the first thing you drink to break your fast and have it at least 30 minutes before eating your first meal.

You can make Kefir in sugar water or whole milk. I prefer to make it in coconut water and drink it straight. If you don’t like the taste you can mix it into a fruit smoothie. Get some kefir here.

3. Plant Based Whole Foods

What are whole foods? Here is a definition straight from Wikipedia:

“Whole foods are plant foods that are unprocessed and unrefined, or processed and refined as little as possible, before being consumed. Examples of whole foods include whole grains, tubers, legumes, fruits, vegetables.”

As a bonus, eating a whole foods diet will cut your food bill. Quite a lot in some cases.

Anything made with white flour is not a whole food. This includes bread, cereals, crackers, granola bars, pasta, etc. You can still eat these things but choose the non-white whole grain version instead.

Same goes for white rice. Eat wild or brown rice instead.

Here’s a list of non-white flour foods.

“Normal” potatoes are okay but sweet potatoes are way better.

4. Eat Less Refined Sugar

Refined sugar is poison and is in many things. Here are some examples. The less of these things you eat, the healthier you will be.

Processed Food. Almost everything processed will have refined sugar in it. This covers most things that are not in the “fresh-food” section of the supermarket. The easiest way to know is by looking at the ingredients label.

Deep Fried Foods. Most things that are deep-fried will also have refined sugar. Even if they don’t, nothing deep fried is good for you anyway.

Drinks. Drinks other than water and fresh herbal tea usually have quite a bit of sugar in them. Soft drinks are the worst.

Clean water is the best drink you can have. Making it your main drink will flush your body of toxins. Aim to drink AT LEAST one liter every day.

Herbal teas, either cold or hot brewed, are a good way to add a bit of flavor as well as get some extra benefits.

Every morning when you wake, rinse your mouth out and then drink a couple of cups of water. It will assist rehydration from the night and stimulate your digestive system.

5. Minimize Drug Use

This includes alcohol, cigarettes, pharmaceuticals you don’t need, and illicit drugs.

Of course, some drugs are worse than others. Smoking cigarettes, for example, is crazy. Drinking a little alcohol once in a while, not so bad.

The antibiotics prescribed to clear an infection you should probably continue to take. The anti-depressants your psychiatrist gave you I would consider flushing down the toilet.

More Healthy Eating Tips

Fruits. Fruits are great but due to a large amount of fructose, consuming too much is bad for your teeth. Limit yourself to 3 serves a day. High fructose corn syrup is much more harmful to your health than regular fruit fructose.

Vegetables. You cannot eat too many vegetables. They should make up a big part of your diet. Local fruits and vegetables that are in season for your location are best.

Herbs. Not only do they make your food taste nicer, they are super healthy. Garlic, ginger, and chili are my favorites, and they are very cheap to buy and easy to grow. Garlic is crazy healthy.

Fresh salads, soups, or steamed are the best way to prepare your vegetables. The next best is stir-fried, roasted, etc. Stay away from anything shallow or deep fried.

Bright or deep colors are best. Go for leafy greens, berries, red bell peppers, papaya, moringa, etc.

Wash all fruits and vegetables. Even organic fruits and vegetables can have poison sprayed on them. Also, ensure you use water you would consider safe to drink.

Get a good variety. Different foods have different nutritional value. When it comes to fruit and vegetables, choose a variety of colors and types. This actually applies to all food. Ensure you are consuming proteins, dairy, fruit, vegetables, complex carbohydrates, good fats, etc.

Proteins. Vegetarian proteins (tofu, eggs, beans, etc.) are best for health and other reasons. Failing that, go for fish (salmon is great) and lean meats (skinless chicken and lean beef are my favorites).

When you crave something sweet go for dark chocolate. The higher percentage of cocoa the better. Raw Honey is also great.

Benefits of Being Vegetarian

For those that think you need meat for a balanced diet, you are incorrect. There are lots of replacement options such as tofu, legumes, nuts, eggs, etc.

There are a few reasons I advocate vegetarianism.

  • It’s healthier. Much healthier than most people realise.
  • The animal cruelty factor, especially with factory farming. Even better on this front would be to go vegan.
  • It saves money. In most cases, being vegetarian is cheaper than eating meat.

Here’s a documentary called Mad Cowboy. Watch it!

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Well, that’s it for these 5 nutrition dietary guidelines. Not too bad right? The hardest thing for most people is intermittent fasting. It was hard for me too! I’ve been doing it for a few years now and I still get hungry before my first meal. But I can still exercise and my mind is sharp.

To be honest, I am sometimes quite slack with the rest of these food nutrition guidelines. Especially when traveling, because I like to try everything. It means I eat more sugar and meat than I’d like and making kefir can be difficult. But I still keep up with the intermittent fasting and daily conditioning so I stay in good shape. I know everyone is different, but I’m confident that most people will have similar results.

Did you find these 5 basic nutrition guidelines useful? If so, please share them with your friends.

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Daily Conditioning Workout http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/daily-conditioning-workout/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/daily-conditioning-workout/#respond Thu, 05 Jul 2018 13:49:29 +0000 https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=21309 Here’s a daily conditioning workout that only uses 2 body-weight exercises. These 2 muscle conditioning exercises give you the greatest benefit in the least amount of time. This is a bodyweight-only fitness conditioning routine. You do not need any special equipment. It works your whole body and you can do it in under 10 minutes
Read more

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Here’s a daily conditioning workout that only uses 2 body-weight exercises. These 2 muscle conditioning exercises give you the greatest benefit in the least amount of time. This is a bodyweight-only fitness conditioning routine. You do not need any special equipment. It works your whole body and you can do it in under 10 minutes a day.

Contents

  • Super Burpees
    • Super burpee benefits
    • How to do super burpees
    • How to do a box squat jump
    • How to do fingertip pushups
    • How to do pushups
    • How to do clap pushups
    • How to do hindu pushups
    • How to do the knee to elbow plank
    • The SFP super burpee
  • Super burpee workout plan
    • Super burpee ladder workout
  • Super burpee alternatives
  • Pull ups
    • How to do pull ups
    • Pull up variations
      • How to do towel pull ups
      • How to do one armed pull ups
      • How to do muscle ups
  • Conclusion
  • Discover a Health and Fitness Program Like No Other
    Get Your Copy of the Survival Fitness Bundle Today

    Daily Conditioning Workout

    A conditioning exercise is an exercise that enhances the physical body in one or more ways. It may increase endurance, speed, strength, etc.

    Doing these 2 conditioning exercises means you no longer need to worry about how to survive conditioning. You can keep fit with minimal effort. Combine it with good nutrition and it is all you need to keep your body toned and healthy.

    5 SFP super burpees are the least amount of daily exercise.

    The ideal daily conditioning routine is:

    • 10 SFP super burpees.
    • 10 pull ups.

    Do this simple routine every day except on your rest day. On your rest day, only do 5 SFP super burpees.

    Super Burpees

    Learn how to do super burpees – the Survival Fitness Plan way! This alternative to burpees is a full body muscle conditioning exercise. It is also a warm-up, light stretch, and cardio workout all in one. The SFP super burpee also gives extra benefits for Fight and Flight activities.

    That makes this the best burpee workout for the Survival Fitness Plan. It is the single most effective exercise you can do.

    SFP Super Burpee Benefits

    Here is a list of the main benefits gained from the SFP super burpee:

    • Balance.
    • Cardiovascular workout.
    • Circulation of life force.
    • Coordination.
    • Explosiveness.
    • Improve body functions (digestion, respiratory, etc.)
    • Flexibility.
    • Muscle conditioning.
    • Hang time (the ability to stay airborne).
    • Striking strength and speed.
    • Warm-up.

    How to do Super Burpees

    The SFP super burpee is 5 separate exercises in one. You can build up to a full super burpee by doing each individual exercise on its own. Once you can do 10 repetitions of each exercise you can put them together.

    • Box squat jump
    • Fingertip pushup
    • Clap pushup
    • Hindu pushup
    • Knee to elbow plank

    IMPORTANT: Do the first SFP super burpee you do slow and with much purpose.

    If you try to do fast super burpees straight away chances of injury increase. By doing the first one very well, it will warm-up and stretch your body. After that, you can increase the speed.

    How to do a Box Squat Jump

    Box squat jumps develop leg strength, core strength, and explosiveness. They also improve soft landing skills, jumping ability, and hang-time. Once you learn box jumps you will be able to jump higher without getting injured. This is good for parkour. It also develops explosiveness in your legs. This will make your kicks faster and more powerful which is great for self-defense.

    Here is a great video by Scott Herman on how to box squat jump. The video after it, also from Scott Herman, gives some great tips for improving the height of your box squat jump.

    How to do Fingertip Pushups

    Fingertip pushups develop striking power, explosiveness, and core strength. They also increase finger strength and grip. Developing finger strength and grip is beneficial in many fight and flight activities. Before trying fingertip push ups, you should be able to do at least 20 regular push ups.

    Here is a fingertip pushups video. It is a good demonstration but is not made for the Survival Fitness Plan so it is missing some key points. To reap the most benefits you should:

    • Push up fast. This will increase your explosive power.
    • Press your fingers into the floor, i.e., try to grip it. This will increase strength building in your fingers.
    • Keep your elbows close to your body. This is so your muscle action will replicate the straight palm-heel as close as possible.

    How to do Push ups
    Push ups are an excellent exercise. They work the whole body, need no equipment, and little space. When doing push ups, do not sacrifice quality to increase the number of repetitions. It is far better to do less proper ones than many bad ones. If you do not do them using the full range of motion, then you will not build the strength needed.

    Once you can do 30 standard push ups, advance to fingertip and clap pushups.

    When doing push ups for the Survival Fitness Plan, keep your elbows close to your body. This mimics the straight strike used in Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense. In the video below he calls them closed push ups.

    How to do Clap Pushups

    Clap push ups benefits include increasing striking power and all over body conditioning. The clapping part improves explosiveness which is awesome for speed and power. They also condition your hands for the palm heel strike.

    Like all push ups in the Survival Fitness Plan, keep your elbows as close to your body as possible. Doing so mimics the action of the self-defense straight palm heel.

    Since this video was not made for the Survival Fitness Plan, her elbows are too far away from her body.

    How to do Hindu Pushups

    Hindu pushups use the downward dog and the upward dog yoga poses. Hindu push ups benefits include:

    • Brain (stimulates).
    • Breathing (chest).
    • Concentration.
    • Eyesight.
    • Hearing.
    • Kidneys.
    • Memory.
    • Nervous system.
    • Spine.
    • Whole body strengthening.

    Here is a Hindu pushup video by Original Strength.

    How to do the Knee to Elbow Plank

    The knee to elbow plank adds to the cardiovascular workout in the super burpee. Other knee to elbow plank benefits include flexibility, core strength, and ab strength.

    The traditional plank knee to elbow method is to bring the knee to the same side elbow, e.g. right knee to right elbow. There is also the twisting plank knee to elbow. This is when you bring your knee to your opposite elbow, e.g., right knee to left elbow. The latter is best for the Survival Fitness Plan as it mimics the kneeing action in self-defense.

    The following video is not in English, but it is still the best demonstration I found.

    The Complete SFP Super Burpee

    Once you can do 10 of each of the above exercises, you can put them together for a complete super burpee.

    Daily Conditioning Workout, How to do Super Burpees Tutorial and Super Burbee Workout Plan, Survival Fitness Plan, Super burpees image

    Super Burbee Workout Plan

    Doing 5 SFP super burpees every day is a good super burpee challenge for beginners. Doing them in the morning is a great way to prepare your body for the day.

    One SFP super burpee takes less than 10 seconds.

    Even if you only have 5 minutes to spare for exercise, you have time to do the above super burpee exercise routine!

    It is also recommended to do SFP super burpees as a warm-up before any vigorous exercise.

    Super Burpee Ladder Workout

    If you want more of a super burpee cardio workout, you can try doing a super burpee ladder workout. This uses the same method as a pushup pyramid. To do a super burpee push up pyramid, do 1 super burpee and take a short rest. 5 to 10 seconds is a good rest time. Then do 2 super burpees and rest. Then 3, rest, 4, rest, etc. All the way up to 10. Then repeat the process in reverse. 10 then rest, 9, rest, 8, rest etc. All the way back down to 0.

    You can alter this super burpee challenge by shrinking the super burpee pyramid. Start with 5 and work your way up to 10 as you build strength.

    Another way to make it easier is to alternate the pyramid with another exercise. For example, if doing super burpees and squats:

    • 1 super burpee, rest
    • 2 squats, rest
    • 3 super burpees, rest
    • 4 squats, rest, etc.

    Super Burpee Alternatives

    Here are some super burpee variations you can try out.

    • Super burpee no push up. Doing super burpees without push ups will make the exercise easier. You can choose to skip either the fingertip or clap pushup or both. Don’t skip the hindu pushup.
    • Super burpee pull up. My second favorite conditioning exercise is the pull up. I like to do 10 super burpees and 10 pull ups every morning. A super burpee pull up combines the two into one awesome exercise. When doing the box squat jump, grab onto the pull up bar and do a pull up.
    • Super burpee pull over. This is step up from the super burpee pull up. When doing the pull up part, pull your chest over the bar. This is a great exercise for parkour strength building. It mimics wall-climbs and muscle-ups.
    • Super burpee broad jump. If you have the room, instead of doing a box jump, jump horizontally as far as you can. Try to land without stumbling forward, like a parkour precision jump.
    • Super burpees with weights. For beasts only! You can use a weight vest to add resistance to your super burpees.

    Pull ups

    Many people think pull ups are only for arm conditioning, but they work many muscles in the body. People that do pull ups regularly have great core strength. Also, being able to pull yourself up is a very useful skill. There are many variations of the pull up, but the best way to condition yourself is with the classic pull up.

    The pull-up is an especially useful exercise for the Survival Fitness Plan. You will build strength for parkour wall-climbs and eventually muscle ups.

    How to do Pull ups

    Grab the bar with a grip a little wider than shoulder-width apart and with your palms facing away from you.

    Let yourself hang all the way down.

    Pull yourself up by pulling your shoulder blades down and together. Keep your chest up and pull up until your chin is above the bar. Touch your chest on it.

    As you are pulling up, keep your body in a vertical line. Do not swing. Concentrate on isolating your back and biceps.

    Pause at the top and then lower yourself back down into the hanging position.

    Daily Conditioning Workout, 1, How to do Pull-ups, Survival Fitness Plan Parkour Conditioning Exercises

    Here’s a good video on how to do a perfect pull-up.

    Pull-Up Variations

    How to do Towel Pull Ups

    Towel pull ups work different muscles than normal pull ups. They also improve grip strength which is beneficial for many Survival Fitness activities. I first started using towel pull ups many years ago when I saw an interview with the Rock. He uses them for grip strength since wrestlers have to grab their opponents a lot. It is easy to see how applicable this is to self defense, climbing, and parkour.

    You will want to be able to do at least 10 towel pull ups. If you cannot do 10 towel pull ups then do as many as you can. Make up the rest with hanging, i.e., hold onto the towel and hang there. 10 seconds of hanging is equal to 1 towel pull-up. For example, if you can only do 10 towel pull ups then you should also hang for 50 seconds.

    As with most exercises, there are many variations. In the Survival Fitness Plan, standard towel pull ups with no extra weights are fine. Feel free to variate if you want. In this video, he uses two towels so he works his lats, which is better for enhancing striking power.

    If you do not have a suitable bar and/or two towels then use one towel and grab and ends with each hand.

    Towel Pull Ups Progression Steps

    1. First be able to do 15 standard pull ups.
    2. Once you have accomplished that, attempt to do 15 towel pull ups. If you can not make it to 15 then do as many as you can and replace the rest with 10 seconds of hanging per pull up missed.

    How to do a One Armed Pull Up

    Once you can do at least 15 normal pull ups, you can progress to the one armed pull up.

    Being able to do a one armed pull-up has the potential to save you, much more-so than the one armed push up. You should also practice the one armed chin up.

    Here is an excellent video showing how to do one armed pull ups.

    One Armed Pull Ups Progression Steps

    Here is a summary of the progression steps for how to do one armed pull ups.

    1. To begin with, be able to do at least 15 good quality pull ups.
    2. After that, start working on the scapular raise exercise.
    3. Also start to do typewriter pull ups.
    4. Progress further with archer pull ups.
    5. Next try uneven pull ups. Gradually increase the distance in height between your hands.
    6. Now do one armed pull ups with the help of a resistance band.
    7. Continure to progress with the negative one armed pull up.
    8. Finally, do one armed pull ups.

    How to do Muscle Ups

    You can use muscle-ups to get on top of higher obstacles where a wall climb-up cannot, e.g., an overhanging ledge. The muscle up is quite a demanding exercise. Gradual progression is the key to success.

    Start with the hanging knee to elbow leg raise.

    Hang off the bar and pull yourself up a little up to retract your shoulder blades. This helps keep you stable while doing the exercise.

    Daily Conditioning Workout, How to Do Muscle-Ups - Survival Fitness Plan Parkour Training1

    Keep your core tight and swing forward a little bit. As your body starts to swing back thrust your knees to your chest.

    Daily Conditioning Workout, How to Do Muscle-Ups - Survival Fitness Plan Parkour Training2

    Next, you need to learn how to use the momentum from the hanging knee to elbow raise to pull yourself over the bar.

    Start the hanging knee to elbow leg raise as normal. At the height of your backswing pull yourself forward and thrust your knees into your chest. Allow your wrists to rotate over the bar.

    Allowing your wrists to rotate over the bar is very important.

    It will help if you have access to a lower bar to practice the movement. If not, then keep it in mind when doing the muscle up.

    Daily Conditioning Workout, How to Do Muscle-Ups - Survival Fitness Plan Parkour Training3

    Now you can put everything together to do the muscle up. It is important to use everything learned so far. Remember to keep your core tight and to retract your shoulder blades.

    Also, pull your arms forward a little bit when pulling yourself over the bar.

    Daily Conditioning Workout, How to Do Muscle-Ups - Survival Fitness Plan Parkour Training4

    You can use some chalk to get an extra grip, although you won’t have this luxury in “real life” scenarios.

    Get some momentum and then thrust your knees into your chest.

    Daily Conditioning Workout, How to Do Muscle-Ups - Survival Fitness Plan Parkour Training5

    As you do so ensure your wrists are loose and then at the right moment pull yourself up over the bar. Push yourself up until your arms are completely extended.

    Daily Conditioning Workout, How to Do Muscle-Ups - Survival Fitness Plan Parkour Training6

    If this was an obstacle, you would bring your foot up and stand.

    To do more muscle-ups, use the momentum you gain when lowering down to go into the next repetition.

    Once you have built more strength try to do the muscle up with less and less swing until you can do it from a dead hang.

    Also practice muscle-ups on overhanging ledges i.e., where there is no wall for your feet to push against. To do this you need to adjust your technique a little since you don’t have a bar for your wrist to rotate over. Use the “pop” hand movement you use when doing a wall climb-up.

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    Daily Conditioning Workout Conclusion

    I’ve covered a lot in this post, but the main things to take away are the super burpee and the basic pull up. You do not need to do the other variations of these 2 exercises. I put them in for those that want to increase their abilities and/or get bored of doing the same exercises every day.

    Personally, I do 10 super burpees 6 days a week without fail, and 5 on the 7th day. If I have something to hang off I will also do 10 pull ups 6 days a week. I like to alternate between normal pull ups and towel pull ups if I can.

    I can’t stress enough that the super burpee is the ultimate exercise. Do 10 of them a day, the 15-minute yoga stretch routine, and follow a healthy diet. This is all you need to stay fit and healthy.

    Did you find this article about daily fitness conditioning useful? If so, please share it with your friends.

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    Arm Locks in Self Defense http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/self-defense-lock-flow-drill/ https://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/self-defense-lock-flow-drill/#respond Thu, 05 Jul 2018 13:37:28 +0000 http://www.survivalfitnessplan.com/?p=13797 Fight and Flight Self Defense Arm Locks in Self Defense Arm Locks in Self Defense Learn 15+ of the best arm locks in self defense with this lock-flow drill. It includes a variety of basic wrist locks, finger locks, shoulder locks, and other arm joint locks. I learned these self defense locks as part of
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    Fight and Flight
    Self Defense
    Arm Locks in Self Defense

    Arm Locks in Self Defense

    Learn 15+ of the best arm locks in self defense with this lock-flow drill. It includes a variety of basic wrist locks, finger locks, shoulder locks, and other arm joint locks.

    I learned these self defense locks as part of my Vortex Control Self Defense training in the Philippines. I present them here in the same drill format. These fighting locks are a combination of aikido joint locks, bjj arm locks, and other martial arts wrist locks.

    For ease of memory and writing the following locks have semi-descriptive, non-official, names.

    The Martial arts locks you will learn include:

    • Shoulder lock
    • Wrist twist
    • Wrist twist variation
    • Wrist lock
    • Wrist pressure
    • Overarm pressure
    • Underarm pressure
    • Bent arm lock
    • One handed bent arm lock
    • Reverse one handed bent arm lock
    • Crook elbow lock
    • Over shoulder arm bar
    • Finger control
    • Finger lock
    • Forarm torque
    • Lock flow drill alternatives
      • Wrist twist alternative
      • Crook elbow lock to figure-4 armbar
      • Alternative ending

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    Arm Locks in Self Defense

    In a self-defense situation, you can use these locks alone or in small combinations.

    Some reasons you may want to apply an armlock are to:

    • Gain pain compliance, e.g., to escort somebody out of a room.
    • Break an opponent’s limb which is likely to end the conflict.
    • Disarm an armed assailant.

    When practicing the following lock flow drill keep in mind the following:

    • As you flow from lock to lock, as a general rule, always have at least one hand gripping your opponent’s limb. This helps to prevent escape.
    • You can slide your hands along your opponent’s limb while still keeping a grip. You will get better at this with practice.
    • Where possible, keep your elbows close to your body. This will enable you to best use your center of gravity to generate power.
    • Use jerking, vibrating, strikes, etc., to “soften” your opponent up. This makes it easier to apply locks and/or to increase the damage done. Some examples of these things are below.

    Shoulder Lock

    From the check-mate position use your left hand to move your opponent’s right hand down. At the same time, move your right hand towards your opponent’s left shoulder.

    1 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Move your left arm under your opponent’s arm to his rear. The underside of your elbow, which is facing up, “hooks” onto his/her arm. Apply pressure on his shoulder with your right hand to bend your opponent forward.

    2 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Here the shoulder lock is from the opposite side and aggressiveness is also added.

    With the hand that is not hooking your opponent’s arm, strike his/her face on the way to grabbing his/her neck.

    As you come back to grab your opponent’s neck do so with force using a cupped hand.

    3 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Follow up with another elbow to your opponent’s head. You can repeat these two strikes and you can also knee him.

    4 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Wrist Twist

    Slide your right hand down your opponent’s arm to control his/her elbow. At the same time slide your left hand down and take a grip on your opponent’s wrist.

    Your left hand is on the inside of your opponent’s guard with your palm facing out. Grip your opponent’s wrist and then pull his/her arm across your centerline. You can use your right hand to help with a push at your opponent’s elbow, although this is usually not needed.

    5 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    As you bring your opponent’s arm across your centerline continue to slide your right hand down his arm. Meet your left hand at your opponent’s wrist.

    Use both your hands to bring your opponent’s hand up and then over to the outside of his guard. Use the waterfall principle.

    6 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Applying the wrist twist in full has the potential to damage the whole limb.

    Wrist Twist Variation

    Release the pressure and then apply a variation of the wrist twist. Do this by pushing your opponent’s wrist down towards him/her.

    7 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Wrist Lock

    Release the pressure from the wrist twist variation. Use your right hand to grip your opponent’s fingers.

    Push your opponent’s hand into his/her face.

    8 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Move your left hand to your opponent’s elbow.

    Push your opponent’s elbow as you pull his/her fingers down and towards your centerline.

    9 Self-Defense Lock Flow Drill, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    As your opponent’s arm straightens grab hold of his thumb with your left hand. Pull his hand towards your center. Lock your elbows close to your body and apply pressure towards your opponent to apply the wrist lock. The pressure is a torquing one, a vortex.

    10 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Wrist Pressure

    Keep a good grip on your opponent’s thumb with your left hand while sliding your right hand up to his/her elbow.

    Bend your opponent’s arm down at his/her elbow and use a circular motion to move it to the inside and up.

    11 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Use your right hand to help secure your opponent’s upper arm in the crook of your elbow.

    Apply pressure on your opponent’s wrist with your left hand to cause pain and lock his/her arm in. You can use your right to strike.

    The image on the right shows the Wrist Pressure lock from the opposite side. It also shows that you can put your opponent’s elbow either on your bicep or your chest. Putting it on your chest is more secure.

    Also, instead of striking, you can use your spare hand to increase the pressure on your opponent’s wrist.

    12 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Overarm Pressure

    Grip your opponent’s wrist with your right hand and then curl your left arm underneath his/hers.

    At the same time, pull your opponent’s arm straight with your right hand.

    13 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    The end result is with your opponent’s arm straight and his/her elbow facing up. Apply pressure on his/her elbow with your forearm.

    As you apply pressure down with your left, pull up with your right. At the same time apply pressure with your forearm as you roll it over your opponent’s elbow. Use the waterfall principle.

    14 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Here it is from the opposite side. You can see the waterfall action clearer.

    15 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Underarm Pressure

    Curl your left a little toward yourself and then underneath your opponent’s arm.

    16 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    This rolls your opponent’s arm so that his/her elbow faces the ground.

    The crook of your elbow applies pressure upwards on your opponent’s elbow. Your left palm faces up. Apply downward pressure on his/her hand with your right hand.

    17 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Here it is from the opposite side.

    18 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Bent Arm Lock

    Return to the overarm pressure lock and then, without letting go of your right hand, bend your opponent’s arm towards him/her and grab your right wrist with your left hand.

    19 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Strike your opponent with your right elbow.

    20 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Here it is from the opposite side. From the position where your arm is on top, you can strike to your opponent’s eyes before bending his/her arm.

    21 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    One Handed Bent Arm Lock

    Let go of your right wrist and grab your opponent’s fingers from the side facing towards you. Your palm faces your opponent.

    Now your left hand has control of your opponent’s limb. Move his/her arm away from yourself and to the outside of your opponent’s shoulder.

    You can strike your opponent with your right.

    22 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Reverse One Handed Bent Arm Lock

    Bring your right hand up on the outside of your opponent’s right arm. Pass it up through the gap between your opponent’s wrist and shoulder. Next, take hold of his fingers, replacing your left hand.

    23 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Grab your opponent’s hair with your right and pull him/her down by the hair and the wrist. Do these two things at the same time.

    You can also stomp the rear of your opponent’s knee.

    24 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Crook Elbow Lock

    Swing your left arm between your opponent’s wrist and shoulder. Do this until the crook of your elbow is on the crook of his elbow with your palm facing up.

    As you do this release your right hand and capture his/her wrist under your armpit.

    Apply upward pressure with your left arm.

    25 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Here is the crook elbow lock from the opposite side.

    26 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Over Shoulder Arm Bar

    Reach over with your right arm, grab your opponent’s left wrist, and pull it towards yourself.

    Pass it across your opponent’s body in-between his/her body and your left hand.

    27 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Use your right hand on the back of your opponent’s left shoulder and your left hand on your opponent’s left lower arm. Twist his body towards your left shoulder.

    28 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Drop your left arm and use it to attack your opponent’s neck. The twist and strike action is very fast. Use the momentum created by the twist of his body to gain more force behind the strike.

    29 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Turn your body to face the same way as your opponent and at the same time drop both your hands to grab his/her left hand.

    When you drop your hands be sure to keep your opponent’s arm between them. Your left-hand grabs your opponent’s wrist and your right-hand takes hold of his/her fingers.

    Continue to turn your body to the left as you straighten your opponent’s arm over your shoulder. His/her elbow sits on your shoulder with the underside of the elbow facing up.

    Pull down on your opponent’s wrist to apply pressure.

    30 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Finger Control

    Use your right hand to grab your opponent’s ring and pinky fingers. Bend those two fingers down back towards your opponent. As you do so bring his lower arm down so that it is on top of yours. Keep your left hand on his/her wrist.

    31 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Begin to spin your opponent so that you swap sides. Do so by bending his/her fingers back as you apply pressure to his/her left arm with your right arm.

    Keep your opponent’s hand near your waist for better leverage on his/her fingers. Pain compliance will keep him/her spinning once your lower arms lose contact.

    Finger Lock

    Towards the end of the spin use your left hand to grab his/her index and middle fingers.

    The third image below shows the finger grab from the opposite side.

    32 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Keeping your opponent’s arm straight, bring his/her hand up with his/her bent fingers pointing up. Jerk your opponent’s hand down towards you.

    33 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Forearm Torque

    Bring your right arm, with your palm facing up, under your opponent’s left arm. Place the crook of your elbow above your opponent’s elbow.

    Grab your opponent’s right wrist with your right hand. Pull his/her hand down by the wrist while applying pressure on his/her elbow with your right arm.

    34 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    At this point, your opponent’s forearm is vertical with his elbow pointing up. His upper arm is horizontal.

    35 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    This completes the basic lock flow drill.

    Lock Flow Drill Alternatives

    Here are a few alternative movements to show how you can alter the drill depending on the situation at hand. The actual number of variations possible are countless, limited only to your imagination.

    Wrist Twist Alternative

    This demonstrates how you can go back to the formula from the lock flow drill. It also shows how you can flow from the rib entry to an upward chin strike as opposed to going to check-mate.

    From the end of the wrist twist, release the pressure on your opponent’s wrist. Strike him/her in the ribs as you would in the rib entry.

    36 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Continue with the rib entry as normal by bringing your hand up to the outside of your opponent’s guard.

    37 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Instead of going into check-mate you can go straight into the arm pull. Follow this with an upward palm heel to your opponent’s jaw.

    38 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Crook Elbow Lock to Figure-4 Armbar

    After releasing pressure from the crook elbow lock it is possible for your opponent to swing at you. Use a variation of the elbow entry to block the attack, i.e., raise your right elbow.

    39 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Capture your opponent’s arm by circling your right arm over his/her left arm. At the same time place your left hand on your opponent’s right shoulder.

    40 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Grab your left forearm with your right hand. Your opponent’s straight arm should be in the crook of your right elbow.

    Apply the figure-4 armbar. Push down on your opponent’s shoulder while applying upward pressure on his elbow.

    As you release the lock strike your opponent’s solar plexus with your right hand.

    41 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Slide your left hand down your opponent’s left arm and grab hold of his/her wrist. As you do this give him/her a right hook to the jaw.

    Continue into the over shoulder armbar.

    42 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Alternative Ending

    This demonstration gives a different ending to the lock flow drill. It starts from the finger lock.

    Bring your opponent’s fingers up to the right side of your chest. With your left hand deliver an uppercut underneath your opponent’s left arm to his/her jaw.

    43 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Use your right hand to control the back of your opponent’s head so you can bend his/her left arm behind and down his/her back. You will need to adjust the grip of your left hand to do so.

    44 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

    Bring your right hand up underneath your opponent’s right armpit to grab his/her left hand. Use your right hand to help feed it down.

    You can release your left hand.

    45 Arm Locks in Self Defense, Survival Fitness Plan Self-Defense

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    In this drill, you have learned a variety arm and wrist locks. You can use them in self defense or other martial arts, including combat sports like MMA. There are many more wrist and arm locks in the world of martial arts, but for practical reasons, 15 is more than enough. For my personal self defense training I include less than half of these, but also add a couple more suited for ground fighting.

    Photo Credit: Senior Airman Stephanie Sauberan. Cropped.

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